China: A Macro History

Front Cover
M.E. Sharpe, Jan 21, 1997
2 Reviews
With the vision and attention to detail that were evident in his highly acclaimed 1587: A Year of No Significance, Ray Huang moves from micro to macro history in the stunning achievement, China: A Macro History, which takes a fresh look at at the full sweep of Chinese history from neolithic times to the present. Provocative, insightful, and displaying an extraordinary breadth of knowledge, Mr. Huang has written a highly readable account of the panorama of Chinese history that will challenge and fascinate scholar and layperson alike. In the words of the late Joseph Needham, I have never enjoyed a read more than Ray Huang's history of China... This revised edition updates the original with a new preface, additional illustrations in the facile hand of the author, and a more reader-friendly format. On the original edition...

Ray Huang's China: A Macrohistory is a most clear, judicious and concise account of Chinese history from antiquity to the present...this study breathes new life into Chinese history, and the past and the present illuminate each other. This work is truly trail-blazing not merely as a text book but as an introduction to China for the general reader.

 

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China, a macro history

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Several good histories of China for general readers have been published in recent years, e.g., Witold Rodzinski's The Walled Kingdom (Free Pr., 1984). Cotterell's book, however, is too amateurish to ... Read full review

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This book may be the best introduction of China. Most of its observations and conclusions are really objective even though the author is ethnically a Chinese. From this book, you can learn a lot about modern China though it is a history book, Chinese haven't been changed too much, if were not there the Mao's reign, much less. But as a marco history, this book certainly overlook a lot perspectives of China as well. People don't make decisions only on a basis of historical reasons but also, I would call, cultural or national psychological interference system, without knowledge from this point of view, the readers could still hardly understand why Chinese are as Chinese, China is as China. 

Contents

IV
3
V
12
VI
23
VII
31
VIII
41
IX
55
X
69
XI
78
XVII
169
XVIII
186
XIX
204
XX
218
XXI
227
XXII
242
XXIII
265
XXIV
295

XII
87
XIII
98
XIV
120
XV
138
XVI
156
XXV
303
XXVI
312
XXVII
323
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