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CONTROVERSIALIST,

AND

IMPARTIAL INQUIRER:

ESTABLISHED FOR THE PURPOSE OF FORMING A SUITABLE MEDIUM FOR

THE DELIBERATE DISCUSSION OF IMPORTANT QUESTIONS IN

RELIGION, PHILOSOPHY, HISTORY, POLITICS, SOCIAL

ECONOMY, ETC.

" MAGXA EST VERITAS, ET PRÆVALEBIT."

"Some may take exception to the form of these writings, because they are chiefly controversial:
but no objection can be more futile. Our land has become glorious through controversy, and
nowbere has the mind of England put on more of might than on the battle-field of truth. The
greatest works our country can boast of take this very form. What were left to us of our Hookers
and Barrows, our Taylors and Miltons, if their controversial works were excepted? The truth is,
wbosderer would have knowledge respecting doctrines and principles that are still unsettled, whether
na religion or in science, must seek it through this form, or be altogether disappointed."

VOLUME III.

LONDON:
PUBLISHED BY HOULSTON AND STONEMAN,

65, PATERNOSTER ROW.

1852.

LONDOX: J. AND W. RIDER, PRINTERS,

1!, Bartholomew Close.

10

STIO
IL LIMBA

True, with his steady but noiseless step, has well nigh completed another annual round, and the old man, with a genial smile, seems to intimate that we must make up this Folame if we would allow him to place it in one of the niches reserved in the great temple of literature for the intellectual products of the present year. In order to secure his proffered services we cheerfully take the hint, and in a few brief sentences mark the termination of our labours for this year, with anticipatory references to their resumption in the next

Of our controversial department much need not be said. In this rolume, as in the preceding ones, great questions of deep and absorbing interest are calmly and pbilosophically discussed; every subject taken up is presented in various pliases, by which a spirit of pure eclecticisin must be imbibed by every thoughtful reader. The novel experiment, commenced in 1850, of establishing a magazine,“ open to all, but devoted to Done," has been continued to the present time with unvarying success. We have proved by the forceful evidence of fact that it is possible for earnest men of every party to meet apon one common platform, and to discuss, in a spirit of kindness, their various opinions. In doing this we have not only established a great principle, but we have worked out details, and thus we believe we have served the great cause of truth, and promoted the highest interests of humanity.

We can also point with pleasure to the other departments of our work, and particularly to those which are specially devoted to the service of those who are pursuing a course of self-instruction and mental culture. The leading articles on “ Rhetoric” are eminently adapted to such; and, with the preceding ones on the “ Art of Reasoning," they will be found to constitute a body of thought and information which must be regarded as doubly valuable to all who desire to influence their fellows by their voices or their pens. The ** Prologomena " on European Philosophy will show how extensive is the field over which the projected series of papers will range, and how varied, and yet, withal, how rich, are its products, as well as the sterling ability with which the topics 'announced are likely to be treated. “The Inquirer" still increases in the number and importance of its queries, and in the value and appropriateness of its responsive" words of wisdom.” “The Young Student and Writer's Assistant” has occupied its new positions of usefulness with great success. Having through the Logic Class and extensive communication with our readers ascertained that we had gathered around us a very large number of self-instructors, and being anxious to render them additional aid in the best possible form, we commenced with the present year two new classes for regular courses of instruction in Grammar and Mathematics. In these we immediately enrolled nearly 300 members; the majority of whom have continued steadily to pursue their studies with the most satisfactory results. We review these labours with pleasure, and rejoice in the thought that we have been able to contribute do insignificant quota to the cause of popular education and intellectual enlightenment-a nation's surest guarantee for freedom and progress.

There are circumstances connected with the history of this volume to which we may bere refer, as otherwise, perhaps, no notice might be preserved of them. We mean the special efforts which bare been made to bring our magazine under more general attention,

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