Helen Keller, Public Speaker: Sightless But Seen, Deaf But Heard

Portada
Greenwood Publishing Group, 1998 - 155 páginas


This is the first book-length study of Helen Keller's public speaking. It contains rhetorical analysis about how a person who was sightless but seen, deaf but heard learned to communicate, and how she gave public speeches for nearly 80 years inspiring others with her vision for a better tomorrow. The analysis, texts of various speeches on a broad range of subjects, a chronology of her speeches, and bibliography will be helpful to students and teachers of speech and all those interested in Helen Keller.

Dentro del libro

Comentarios de la gente - Escribir un comentario

Crítica de los usuarios - Marcar como inadecuado

PORTUGUES

Páginas seleccionadas

Contenido

Not a Muted Voice The Effectiveness of Kellers Speaking
53
Derechos de autor

Otras ediciones - Ver todas

Términos y frases comunes

Pasajes populares

Página xxiii - For ye shall go out with joy, and be led forth with peace: the mountains and the hills shall break forth before you into singing, and all the trees of the field shall clap their hands.
Página xx - We walked down the path to the well-house, attracted by the fragrance of the honeysuckle with which it was covered. Some one was drawing water and my teacher placed my hand under the spout. As the cool stream gushed over one hand she spelled into the other the word water, first slowly, then rapidly.
Página xi - I long to accomplish a great and noble task, but it is my chief duty to accomplish humble tasks as though they were great and noble.
Página 27 - My teacher is so near to me that I scarcely think of myself apart from her. How much of my delight in all beautiful things is innate, and how much is due to her influence, I can never tell. I feel that her being is inseparable from my own, and that the footsteps of my life are in hers. All the best of me belongs to her— there is not a talent, or an aspiration or a joy in me that has not been awakened by her loving touch.
Página xxii - Miss Fuller gave me eleven lessons in all. I shall never forget the surprise and delight I felt when I uttered my first connected sentence, "It is warm." True, they were broken and stammering syllables; but they were human speech. My soul, conscious of new strength, came out of bondage, and was reaching through those broken symbols of speech to all knowledge and all faith.
Página 1 - The next important step in my education was learning to read. As soon as I could spell a few words my teacher gave me slips of cardboard on which were printed words in raised letters. I quickly learned that each printed word stood for an object, an act, or a quality. I had a frame in which I could arrange the words in little sentences; but before I ever put sentences in the frame I used to make them in objects. I found the slips of paper which represented, for example, "doll...
Página 1 - ... of cardboard on which were printed words in raised letters. I quickly learned that each printed word stood for an object, an act, or a quality. I had a frame in which I could arrange the words in little sentences ; but before I ever put sentences in the frame I used to make them in objects. I found the slips of paper which represented, for example, doll, is, on, bed and placed each name on its object.
Página 15 - Have you ever been at sea in a dense fog, when it seemed as if a tangible white darkness shut you in, and the great ship, tense and anxious, groped her way toward the shore with plummet and sounding line, and you waited with beating heart for something to happen?
Página 48 - But during the first nineteen months of my life I had caught glimpses of broad, green fields, a luminous sky, trees and flowers which the darkness that followed could not wholly blot out. If we have once seen, "the day is ours, and what the day has shown.
Página 43 - And the eye cannot say to the hand, ' I have no need of thee ' ; nor again the head to the feet,

Referencias a este libro

Acerca del autor (1998)

LOIS J. EINHORN, Associate Professor Rhetoric at Binghamton University, has written at length on public address and rhetorical theory and criticism. She is the author of Abraham Lincoln, The Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Greenwood, 1992) and is co-author of Effective Employment Interviewing: Unlocking Human Potential (1982).

Información bibliográfica