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JAYAICA .....
......... Port MARIA ...............

.Day, D........... June 20.
STEWART Town .........Dexter, B. B. ...June 18.

STURGE TOWN ............. Hodges, S........,June 29,
TRINIDAD... ...

..... SAVANNA GRANDE ...... Cowen, G..........June 29.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS.
The thanks of the Committee are presented to the following-

Friends at Hanley, for a box of clothing and useful articles, for Rev. J. Merrick, Bimbia ;
Mr. F. Nicholson, for a parcel of the “ Patriot;”
Ladies at Camberwell, by Mrs. Harwood, for a case of clothing and useful articles, for

Rev. Dr. Davies, Montreal;
British and Foreign School Society, for a case of school materials, for Rev. J. Hume,

Jamaica; Mrs. Meacher, Hackney, for four volumes of the “ Baptist Magazine,” for Rev. J. Mer

rick, Bimbia; Mr. Monk, Finsbury, for a parcel of the “Missionary Herald,” for Rev. W. K. Rycroft,

Grand Cay.

As our friend, Mr. Neal of Liverpool, has for the present left that town, parcels for Africa must no longer be sent to his address there. Mr. C. Bezer, Long Room, Customs, Liverpool, hias kindly engaged to take charge of letters; but parcels must be sent to the Mission House, London.

CONTRIBUTIONS,
Received on account of the Baptist Missionary Society, during the month

of July, 1849.

£ 8. d.
£ 8. d.

£ 8. d.
Blandford Street-
Annual Subscription.

BUCKINGHAMSHIRE,
Sunday School

1 10 0 Darkin, Rev. C............ 2 0 0 Do., for Dove....... 3 4 11 Amersham, on account 45 0 0 Bloomsbury Chapel-,

Olney-
Griffiths, Mrs., by Mr.

Collections......

9 5 10 Donations.

McCree

0 2 0
Contributions

8 15 3 Eldon StreetBuxton, Sir E. N., Bart.,

Do., Sunday School 0 15 7 M.P...

Collection 25 00

4 4 10 Stony StratfordCopperthwaite, M. A., Islington-

Collections ............... 7 13 3 box by

0 4 0 Contributions, by Miss Eason, Miss, a little

Gilbert, for Patna
girl from India, by 0 12 0
Orphan Refuge 3 0 0

CAMBRIDGESHIRE.
Educational Committee
Prescot Street, Little-

Wisbeach of Society of Friends,

Contributions, on acfor Trinidad Schools. . 40 00

count ...

25 0 0

Dawbarn, Mr. W...... 0 10 6 F., for Jamaica Schools 22 12 0 Shakspeare's Walk

Collection

1 0 0 Friend, an old, for Patna

DevoxSNIRE. Orphan Refuge

0 10 6 Peto, s. M., Esq., M.P.,

BEDFORDSHIRE.
Bradninch

1 1 0 for Salter's Hill Schools 5 0 0 Luton

Budleigh Salterton 8 18 6 S. G...... 2 0 0 Old Meeting

Collumpton

2 0 0 Do., for Jamaica The

Contributions, on

Exeterological Institution 1 0 0 account

7 11 3 Commin, Mr. James 1 0 0 Union Chapel

Contributions (moi-
Legacy.

ety)
40 00

Essex,
Courtney, Mrs. Eliza-

Colchester

BERKSHIRE. beth, late of Wal

Collections................ 15 9 6 Readingworth, less expenses 166 3 8

Contributions, Juve-
nile
20 19 3

GLOUCESTERSHIRE.
Do., for Africa ... 080
LONDON AUXILIARIES.

Do., Sunday School,

Chipping SodburyAlfred Place, Kent Road

for Dove .........

2 18 0 Contributions, for Collection 1 50

Dore.....

0 2 6

.... 16 41

........NO

£ 8. d.
£ 8. d.

& &. do Shortwood Harpole

Frome, continued Contributions, for

Collection ................

2 7 7 Contributions, for Salter's Hill Schools 6 0 0 Contributions

3 11 0

Patna Orphan
Wotton under Edge-
Do., Sunday School 0 0 7

Refuge... 2 19 0
Perrin, W., Esq.,
Kingsthorpe-

Badcox LaneKingswood 1 0 0 Collection 2 4 0 Collection

5 13 10 Rogers, Mr. John...... 1 0 0 Kislingbury

Contributions 8 10 8 Collection

8 5 0

Legacy of late Mr.
HERTFORDSHIRE.
Contributions, for

Butcher, Dividend
Doce

0 4 0
on

5 14 6 HertfordMilton...

Sheppards BartonContributions .......... ..... 2 17 7 Northampton, Grey

Collection

5 2 2 Ware

friars' Street

3 46

Contributions 12 5 1 Malin, Mr., for Debt... 0 5 0 Patchell

4 0 0
Ravensthorpe
3 12 0

68 13 4
KENT,
Roade

Acknowlodged before 65 0 0 Collections .....

5 3 6 FootscrayProceeds of Tea Meet

3 13 4 Contributions, for

ing .....

2 7 6 Dore..................... 1 10 1 Contributions

1 7 5
Spratton-

STAFFORDSHIRE.
Collection
LANCASHIRE.

1 1 0 Hanley-
Sulgrave........

2 1 0

Contributions, JureLiverpool

nile, for Ceylon Contributions, by Rev. Towcester

Schools.............. 5 0 0 C. M. Birrell, for

Collections ......

7 10 5 Stores for Haili... 5 0 0

Proceeds of Tea Meet-
Do., Pembroke Cha-

ing
5 5 3

SUFFOLK,
pel Sunday Schools,

Contributions 13 4 7 Bures St. Maryfor Patna Orphan

Collection

5 100 Refuge. 4 0 0

26 03 DebenhamExpenses

0 17 6 Peck, Mr. John 1 1 0 NORFOLK.

Ipswich

25 2 9 Goodchild, Mr. ...... 100 Dereham West Haddon

Turret Green-
Collection

4 60
Contributions

2 15 6
Collection ...

4 12 6 Contributions ......... 6 6 5 Weston by Weedon

Contributions 4 16 6 Do., Juvenile.. 3 12 8

Collection ..

5 14 11 SudburyDo., Sunday School 0 i 11 Proceeds of Tea Meet

Holman, Misses 1 0 0 ing

1 13 3 NORTHAMPTONSHIRE.

SUSSEX,

RUTLANDSHIRE.
Brington.......
2 3 8

Hastings-
Oakham-

Gray, Rev. Dr. ......... 0 10 6
Bugbrook --
Collection ...............

2 5 1 7 0 0

Rye Collections....

9 7 4

Allen, Mrs.............. 5 0 0
Contributions ..........
6 2 7

WILTSHIRE.
SOMERSKTSHIRE.

Trowbridge-
15 9 11

Back StreetExpenses 0 15 0 Frome

Collections............ 10 7 2 Collection, Public

Contributions

66 5 7 14 14 11 Meeting

9 5 7 Hackleton

Contributions

Bethesda 13 90

Collection Collection

9 14 2 Do., for TranslaContributions .........

1 9 9
tions*

5 13 6
Do., for Dove.........
0 10 0

SCOTLAND. Hanslope

* This amount (£5 13s. 6d.), ShetlandCollection

2 2 10 collected for the Bible Translation Contributions, by Mr. Contributions

1 4 9 Society, has been placed to its Harlestone..................

Sinclair Thomson... 110 1 ll 0 credit with the B. M.S.

......

..... 1 1 6

..............

Subscriptions and Donations in aid of the Baptist Missionary Society will be thankfully received by William Brodie Gurney, Esq., and Samuel Morton Peto, Esq., M.P., Treasurers, or the Rev. Frederick Trestrail and Edward Bean Underhill, Esq., Secretaries, at the Mission House, 33, Moorgate Street, London: in EDINBURGH, by the Rev. Christopher Anderson, the Rev. Jonathan Watson, and John Macandrew, Esq.; in Glasgow, by Robert Kettle, Esq.; in Dublin, by John Purser, Esq., Rathmines Castle ; in Calcutta, by the Rev. James Thomas, Baptist Mission Press; and at New York, United States, by W. Colgate, Esq. Contributions can also be paid in at the Bank of England to the account of “ W. B. Gurney and others.”

THE WORST IS OVER.

An old proverb says, “It is a long lane which has no turning.” Ireland's wants and woes, indeed her whole condition, social, political, and religious, seemed stretched out interminably, without hope of change. It was a dark and dreary path, stretching out as far as the eye could reach, without relief; and movement along with it seemed a perpetual progress downward, into yet lower depths of misery and woe!

And there was evidence enough to show that for many years the Irish, of all classes, had been sinking. The case seemed almost hopeless. Despair sat brooding on the people; and those who felt it to be a duty to lend a helping hand, were smitten by the same spirit. Even Christian persons, full of the missionary spirit, strong in their reliance on the Divine promise, and earnest in their belief of the ultimate triumph of the gospel, sometimes looked on Ireland as an exception to the general law.

Under these circumstances it was scarcely to be expected that the churches would support the mission with great liberality or zeal. Hence its recent history has been full of difficulty, pecuniary embarrassment, and inadequate means and effort. Even prayer was but feebly and scantily poured forth! It was hoping against hope. The success which attended the agency employed was so comparatively small, as scarcely to throw a gleam of light across the dark and dismal scene.

Such was the general aspect of things till within a recent period. Then the Almighty appeared. His dispensations, at first, were overwhelming. Nothing but ruin seemed nigh. It was feared too, that even this country would be dragged down into the same gulph. By terrible things in righteousness wilt thou answer us, O God of our salvation."

The famine swept down tens of thousands, and many more fled in terror to distant shores. The hearts of the British people were touched with deep compassion, and they displayed it nobly, and the Irish were amazed at their liberality. Then came evidence of a change in the feelings and habits of the people. Missionaries were not slow to perceive it, and redoubled their exertions. The legislature set about their work in earnestness. Events compelled them, at last, to do something right. The spring opened with promise, and as the season advanced hope once more sprung up. The Queen determined to visit her Irish subjects. Every where she was received with an enthusiasm stronger and more intense than the inost sanguine ventured to hope for. Both the people and their sovereign fairly captivated each other. And when on leaving the Irish capital, the monarch standing on the paddle-box of her yatch, threw

aside, for a few moments, in sympathy with the people whose loyalty and affection broke over all bounds, the rigid etiquette of royalty, and waved her handkerchief to the shouting multitude, it was plain that the union would henceforth be not a mere name, but a fact.

Confidence will now take the place of distrust. Enterprise will begin. Capital will flow in, and mines, factories, and rails, will soon spring up. Agriculturists, competent to manage farms will find their way into the heart of the country. Her bogs will be reclaimed, and their hidden treasures brought to light. Cultivation will creep up the mountain side. Employment will become plentiful, and industry mark the people. We have got to the turning of the long dark lane.

Hand in hand with these will march the truth, which has hitherto but pioneered the way; and popery, gradually losing its hold, will no longer cover the land with ignorance, indolence, and vice. A people who read their bibles, do not leave their lands a waste. Let us then be up and doing. Let our friends afresh give themselves to action and prayer. If they regard events in their proper light, they will find a new stimulus in the thought, that the worst is over.

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