History of the United States of America, from the Discovery of the Continent [to 1789].

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D. Appleton, 1885

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Contenido

Long debates upon it 382
47
The furtraders induce Lord North to retain the interior American posts Pitt
53
THE AMERICAN ARMY AND ITS CHIEF
70
The king of England invites a cordial understanding with France
71
CHAPTER VII
78
In Maryland In congress Riot in Philadelphia
82
Of Delaware Of Maryland Of Georgia Of South Carolina
86
The officers of the army bid farewell to Washington
93
The objections of Richard Henry
100
ON THE WAY TO A FEDERAL CONVENTION 17831787
106
CHAPTER II
110
History of the clause against slavery 289
118
National measures of Virginia
122
CHAPTER III
125
1783
136
Proposed reform of the confederacy by less than a unanimous vote
143
The American commissioners for treaties meet with a rebuff from England
144
CHAPTER V
154
Public opinion on paper money
169
THE FORMATION OF THE AMERICAN CONSTITU
177
Washington embarrassed for income A gradual abolitionist
185
Only five states appear Their extreme caution in their report
196
Expectation of the British ministry
202
IN FIVE BOOKS
205
CHAPTER I
207
THE CONFEDERATION
211
Extent of the federal legislative powers
217
The veto power
223
202
236
The large states prevail
255
Movement against the slavetrade Two classes of slave states
264
CHAPTER V
270
Anxiety of the country
276
1784
277
PAGE
278
Virginia accepts the ordinance with its exclusion of slavery
291
The quorum Qualifications of electors
297
Madisons vote decides that the power shall not be granted
303
Who are citizens? Fugitives from justice Fugitive slaves
309
Navy and militia Clause on the militia
313
North Carolina will join South Carolina and Georgia on the question
319
The universal love of union Intercitizenship
322
Lee and Wilson in Pennsylvania
383
A RETROSPEOT
389
CHAPTER III
393
Wise conduct of Hancock
395
The convention wavering
401
The constitution in New Hampshire
409
Debate between Lowndes and Pinckrey
415
His station and character
419
CHAPTER V
421
Four motives to union
422
Is replied to by Pendleton and Madison
427
Navigation of the Mississippi
433
The American constitution Its forerunners
442
CHAPTER II
452
Opinions of Jefferson 403
461
Sweden Prussia
463
of John Adams 408
471
327
478
The proposed five states in the Northwest
479
The requirement of an oath
480
The tenure for seven years with perpetual reeligibility
484
Rufus Putnams plan for colonizing the West His appeal to Washington 282
496
Congress declines to lead the way England compels union
497
The Federalist and its authors
500
The views of Virginia
503
A triple executive proposed
507
Parsons presents its memorial to congress Efect of the memorial
513
The army at Newburg Its appeal to congress
515
Jefferson describes the United States as one nation
518
Subject referred to a committee of eleven
520
Ordinance for governing the territory of the United States Its clauses 287
527
Grayson and slavery Nathan Darc and King
535
THE CONSTITUTION IN PENNSYLVANIA DELAWARE AND NEW JERSEY
537
Washington pleads with Virginia statesmen for a national constitution 115
540
Progress of the world by mastery over the forces of nature
544
Pennsylvania
545
Jeffersons ordinance
549
Franklin presents the constitution to its legislature
551
VOL VI
562
Independence and a continental convention and charter
563
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Página 472 - Heaven itself has ordained; and since the preservation of the sacred fire of liberty, and the destiny of the republican model of government, are justly considered as .deeply, perhaps as finally staked, on the experiment intrusted to the hands of the American people.
Página 218 - Confederation, and moreover to legislate in all cases to which the separate States are incompetent, or in which the harmony of the United States may be interrupted by the exercise of individual legislation ; to negative all laws passed by the several States contravening, in the opinion of the National Legislature, the Articles of Union, or any treaty subsisting under the authority of the Union...
Página 148 - I have done nothing in the late Contest, but what I thought myself indispensably bound to do, by the Duty which I owed to my People. I will be very frank with you. I was the last to consent to the Separation, but the Separation having been made and having become inevitable, I have always said, as I say now, that I would be the first to meet the Friendship of the United States as an independent Power.
Página 106 - With a heart full of love and gratitude, I now take leave of you ; I most devoutly wish that your latter days may be as prosperous and happy as your former ones have been glorious and honorable.
Página 390 - Under the Articles of Confederation each State retained its sovereignty, freedom and independence, and every power, jurisdiction and right not expressly delegated to the United States.
Página 321 - I congratulate you, fellow-citizens, on the approach of the period at which you may interpose your authority constitutionally, to withdraw the citizens of the United States from all further participation in those violations of human rights which have been so long continued on the unoffending inhabitants of Africa, and which the morality, the reputation, and the best interests of our country, have long been eager to proscribe.
Página 374 - That the said report, with the resolutions and letter accompanying the same, be transmitted to the several legislatures, in order to be submitted to a convention of delegates, chosen in each State by the people thereof, in conformity to the resolves of the convention made and provided in that case.
Página 158 - That no man shall be compelled to frequent or support any religious worship, place or ministry whatsoever, nor shall be enforced, restrained, molested, or burthened in his body or goods, nor shall otherwise suffer on account of his religious opinions or belief...
Página 45 - The time shall come, when, free as seas or wind, Unbounded Thames shall flow for all mankind, Whole nations enter with each swelling tide, And seas but join the regions they divide; Earth's distant ends our glory shall behold, And the new world launch forth to seek the old.
Página 365 - On the whole, sir, I cannot help expressing a wish that every member of the Convention, who may still have objections to it, would with me, on this occasion, doubt a little of his own infallibility and, to make manifest our unanimity, put his name to this instrument.

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