Imágenes de páginas
PDF
EPUB

some farourite tune, or uttered some well. glorified in His saints, and to be admired remembered stanza, as

in all them that believe!”

JOHN P. LOCKWOOD. "When I survey the wondrous cross," &c.; “Bat O when that last conflict's o'er,” &c.; ANN ELIZABETH JACKSON was con

verted to God in early life, under the "O for this love iet rocks and hills," &c.; earnest, loving ministry of the Rev.

Robert Bryant, who has since gone to his and when, exhausted by the effort, she heavenly rest. It was in the Wesleyan sank in her chair, she would break out in chapel, Alford, whilst he was discoursing some expression of thanksgiving or fervent on the duty of the young to "remember praise.

nor their Creator," that she determined In the erection of the beautiful chapel to yield her heart to God; and during her at Windhill she evinced the liveliest inter stay in the house of a pious uncle and aunt est, and ber attendance on its services, she was enabled to cast her soul on the amidst increasing debility and languor, was atonement of Christ, and found “joy and Dost ciemplary.

peace in believing." Although somewhat Her last affliction was protracted and unfavourably circumstanced, in the earlier serere ; bat her faith pever faltered. Her part of her Christian course, she was ecaversation and spirit indicated a mind enabled to persevere even unto the end. calmly resting on the covenant of redeem The advantages of early decision of characing love, and fully matured for the glory ter were manifested in her subsequent of the heavenly state ; and when the pro- experience. She had tasted of "the gress of disease rendered articulation diffi. rowers of the world to come;” and this cult, her ejaculations and gestures told of world and its vanities had no charms for unbroken peace and abounding joy. “You her, and no real hold on her affections. are very poorly," observed her medical Thorough earnestness of purpose marked attendant; —" but very happy," was the her career, and she habitually enjoyed, prompt reply. She often exclaimed, with through faith, the blessing of God's chosen deep feeling, "My precions Saviour! My ones. She met for several years in the class preeicas Saviour! In one of my last of the late lamented Mr. J. F. Smyth, of interviews with her, when the powers of Boston, from whom she received much mature were well-nigh exhausted, and life encouragement and fatherly counsel. He was ebbing ont apace, after I had reminded took a lively interest in her welfare; and, ber of the unfailing fidelity of her cove- being well acquainted with her peculiar nant-God, and the stability of the Rock of trials, was enabled to contribute largely to Ages, she replied emphatically, " O yes ! her stability and comfort. His sudden O yes!” When the question was put to removal from the church militant deeply her, whether she found Christ precious ? affected her, and impressed her with the she summoned all her remaining energy, necessity of deeper spirituality, as a presad replied in the affirmative; adding, in paration for the great change. When feeble tones, “ I am waiting for the coming bereavements are thus sanctified to the of the Lord."

church, they answer the end of Him who She had long dwelt in the border-land, ordains them : md on the banks of the deep-flowing river

“For us they sicken, and for us they dio."

for which " divides that heavenly land from ours;" and her passage through it at Shortly after her avion with the people last was gentle. While the congregation of God, she became a Sabbath-school with which she had been accustomed to teacher, and made it a rule, for many worship were engaged in Divine service on years, to attend every Sunday. In this Sunday, January 27th, 1867, she safely office, she was made a blessing to many. crossed the stream, and, escorted by the Being naturally of a gentle temper, and shining ones, " passed through the gates manifesting in her deportment and life into the city" to dwell “for ever with the “the fruits of the Spirit,” she commended Lord." If aught could add to her happi- religion, both by precept and example, to Dess, it would be the knowledge of the hcr youthful charge. She delighted to fact, that the period of her decease was dwell on the love of God, as revealed in distinguished by a gracious visitation from Jesus Christ. The means of grace were above, resulting in a blessed revival of the to her channels of living water, especially work of God, and the addition of many the ministry of the word. It was her souls to the Church of Christ. May the privilege to enjoy the faithful expositions satne spiritual religion be continued from of the Rev. John Morris, who laboured age to age, until “He shall come to be happily in the Boston Circuit for three

[graphic]

resignation. Her refuge was in Christ : her end was peace.

W . W. s.

through our Lord Jesus Christ. Although sel dom able to preach during the last twelve years, he continued to evince the liveliest interest in the state of the work of God ; and many loving messages did he send to his brethren, the Local preachers, at their quarterly gatherings. He assured the Superintendent of the Circuit, that no day had passed since his appointment in which he had not remembered him in prayer by name. Shortly before his departure, he said to & grandson and grand-daughter, who were wait. ing upon him, “I don't think I shall see the morning. I shall soon be at home.

*Ready for me the angels wait, To triumph in my blest estate.'

August 26th. At Caythorpe, in the Sleaford Circuit, Mr. William White. He was born at Caythorpe on June 30, 1831, and was favoured with parents who lived in the fear of God. He was apprenticed in the same village ; and, during his apprenticeship, became the subject of saving grace. Although his master was not then converted, he had a lively sense of the importance of religion, and was induced to avail himself of the services of his young apprentice in conducting family-worship. Thus did the young disciple" hold forth the word of life," and exert a salutary influence on the family-circle ; for both lis master and his mistress were shortly brought to God. At the age of seventeen, William White began to call sinners to repentance; and for twenty years preached the Gospel with great Acceptance and success. He was much esteemed in the village in which he resided; and throughout the Circuit was highly respected as a faithful servant of Christ. For several years he held the office of Class-leader, and attended punctually to the duties devolving upon him. During the affliction which terniinated in death, he was mercifully sustained ; and although, at times, his mind wandered, there were seasons of mental vigour and spiritual consolation, when he gave to his distressed wife a distinct testimony to his personal interest in Christ, assuring her that he was safely resting on tho Rock of Ages.

W.8.

While the latter gave him a few spoonsful of tea, he looked at her, and said, “They gave Him vinegar to drink!" "I am persuaded," he impressively added, “that neither death, nor life, nor angels, nor principalities, nor powers, nor things present, nor things to come, nor height, nor depth, nor any other creature, shall be able to separate me from the love of God, which is in Christ Jesus my Lord!"

T. HT.

September 16th.-At West-Witton, in the Middleham Circuit, Mrs. Elizabeth Rodwell. In early life she gave her heart to God, and joined the Methodist Society, of which she continued a member and an ornament for nearly forty years. For steadfastness in the faith, spiritual earnestness, and power in prayer, she became distinguished. By much communion with God, she was enabled eminently to serve Him and her generation according to His will. In her household as a Christian parent, in her class as a faithful leader, and in the village as a Christian friend, and visiter of the afflicted, she was a power and a blessing. She " warred a good warfare," and passed away saying, "I have fought a good fight."

J. B. D.

October 16th.-At Willoughlon, in the Gainsborough Circuit, Mr. John Post, aged fiftyseven years. For thirty-five years he was an earnest and devoted member of the WesleyanMethodist Society. Having, at the beginning of his career, counted the cost, and being upheld by the grace of Christ, he never swerved, but held fast his confidence to the end. His afflictions towards the close of life were very painful ; but he bore them with lowly submission to the Divine will, and not a murmuring word escaped his lips. He was a man of prayer, and took a deep interest in every department of the work of God. His death was most peaceful and happy.

S. T.

October 5th.-At Mytholmroyd, at the residence of his step-daughter, Mrs. Clay, Mr. George Hartley, in his eighty-third year. He was the oldest Local preacher in the Soworby. Bridgo Circuit, having entered upon that honourable work in the year 1808. It was under the ministry of the late Rev. Cleland Kirkpatrick, when about seventeen years old, that he was brought to the knowledge of the truth. By reading and study he diligently sought to qualify himself for usefulness; nor did he labour in vain. When he was the leader of a class of forty members, many years ago, it was his rule to visit any who had been absent from class twice in succession. Nor was he satisfied till each obtainod a clear sense of acceptance with God,

November 7th.-At Sunny-Bank, Shipley, Mary Jane, the beloved daughter of the Rev. John P. Lockwood. She was converted to God in early life, and the reality of that great change was abundantly manifested by her transparent simplicity and her high spiritual tone. Modest and retiring, sha shunned publicity; but her efforts for the spiritual welfare of others were almost unceasing; and, as the result of the Divine blessing upon them, a rich harvest of spiritual good has been already reaped, in cases of gourd conversion. Possessing an amiable disposition, and a mind under the control of Christian principle, as well as refined by careful culture, she won the esteem of all with whom she was associated, and her memory is fragrant. Her removal was comparatively unexpected; but the river seemed to be crossed at its narrowest part. She was fully matured for the inheritance of the saints in light;" and her death was in keeping with her life,-serene and tranquil.

J. P. L.

LONDON: PRINTED BY WILLIAM NICHOLS, 46, HOXTON SQUARE.

described by herself, in a letter addressed to on my way happy and rejoicing in His a sister-in-law, and dated November 21st, love. And my song each day, and all 1861. "I have become ia heart and soul day, is, ‘Christ for me. My heart is a Methodist; tot persuaded into it by constantly crying out, otbers, but of my own free choice,-influ. enced only by an earnest desire to unite

If all the world my Saviour knew, myself to that church in which I have Then all the world would love Hiin too." found rest to my soul. I must tell you, dearest sister, sometbing of the new joy My dear sister, I know you will rejoice and peace which have sprung up withiu, with me, in this my newly-found treasure. even Christ the hope of glory. I had 0! pray for me that I may Dever lose it, leng been seeking rest for ny weary spirit, but retain it steadfastly to the end." bat found none. At the beginning of last On the Sunday night before her death, month, however, we had a week of special she expressed to her husband a fear services throughout the Circuit; and it that her affliction might prove fatal, and was at the second of these that the Spirit added that, while she should like to be of God strove so powerfully with me that spared on his account, yet, whatever hapI was forced to cry aloud for mercy. And pened, all would be right, as she had not a that Saviour, who is ever waiting to be doubt of her acceptance with God, and she merciful, enabled me to cast myself wholly could leave herself in His hands. Her apon Him,- to lay the burden of my sins spirit took its flight on the following at the foot of His cross, and then sent me Friday morning,

H. J. S.

RECENT DEATHS.

ters at her house. In the prospect of death she had no fear, but found the Saviour very “precious."

MARCH 2d, 1866.-At Middleham, Mr. Wil Tiarn Petch, a godiy farmer. At the age of six teen, be "put his hand to the plough," and never ** looked back." For half a century he was a diligent labourer in the work of the Lord. Ou bis farm, and equally in his family, be bonoured God. In a field he obtained a sense of pardoning merey: and often, amongst the furtots, be found a holy place. He cultivated his heart, and his "profiting" was apparent. While in retard to God be walked in the sunshine, in regard to mpen he walked in the shade. His moral Character was unexceptionable, and his religion opened to him enjoyments, beyond any that earth can afford. Eminent y devout, he realized the Divine presence everywhere, and praised God in everything. For forty years he lived in the enjoyment of perfect love, witnessing to the suficiency of the grace of Christ, "out of a pure heart and faith unfeigned." His zeal in the service of his Baviour was unwearied. To win souls to Christ was his ceaseless endeavour ; and he was not without success. In his house, be maintained a godly discipline; "he comtranded his children and his household after him." He combined cheerfulness with gravity. Mis "speech was always with grace;" and he was " an Israelite indeed, in whom was no fuis.* Ilis end was truly peaceful : the stroke

S. T.

23 gentle. He came “ to his grave in a full uze, like as a shock of corn cometh in in his

J. B. D.

August 18th.–At Manchester, in the Grosvenor-street Circuit, Mary Anne, relict of the late Mr. James Binns, aged seventy-two years. Her first association with Wesleyan Methodism was as a scholar, and afterwards as a teacher, in the Gravel-lane Sabbath-school; with which, for upwards of twenty years, she stood connected, securing the respect and affection of all who knew her. In the year 1811, she became a member of the Methodist Society, and was one of the first Missionary collectors in the city of Manchester. After her marriage to Mr. Binns. -a truly devoted, Christian man,--the cares of a numerous family left her but little leisure for the more active duties of Christian benevolence; yet, whilst exemplary in her attendance on the social and public means of grace, she ordered well her household, training up her children" in the nurture and admonition of the Lord." Her picty was uniform : manifesting itself in a consistent, blameless walk, not only within the precincts of her home, but before the Church and the world. She was a diligent student of the Holy Scriptures, and was thoroughly grounded in the belief of their Divine inspiration and authority. Mrs. Binns was, from conviction, a Wesleyan Methodist. Her attachment to the doctrines, the economy, and the ministers of Methodism, was strong and ardent. Like her excellent husband, she never wavered in her devotedness to the Church of her early choice; but in seasons of strife and difficulty, they were both found on the side of order and godly discipline. Her last illness, though lingering and painful, was sustained with Christian fortitude and

March 27th, 1867-At Beckingham, in the Gainsborough Cirenit. Mary Stovin, who had been & member of the Wesleyan-Methodist Society for fifty-four years. She was a sincere and devoted follower of the Lord Jesus Christ; and, for flirty years, kindly entertained His minis

resignation. Her refuge was in Christ: her end through our Lord Jesus Christ. Although sel was peace.

W. W. S. dom able to preach during the last twelve years,

he continued to evince the liveliest interest in August 26th.-At Caythorpe, in the Sleaford the state of the work of God; and many loving Circuit, Mr. William White. He was born at Cay messages did he send to his brethren, the Local thorpe on June 30, 1831, and was favoured with preachers, at their quarterly gatherings. He parents who lived in the fear of God. He was assured the Superintendent of the Circuit, that apprenticed in the same village ; and, during no day had his apprenticeship, became the subject of which he had not remembered him in prayer by saving grace. Although his master was not name. Shortly before his departure, he said to then converted, he had a lively sense of the im a grandson and grand-daughter, who were waitportance of religion, and was induced to availing upon him, "I don't think I shall see the himself of the services of his young apprentice in morning. I shall soon be at home. conducting family-worship. Thus did the young disciple “hold forth the word of life," and exert a

Roady for me the angels wait, salutary influence on the family-circle ; for both

To triumph in my blest estate.'" his master and his mistress were shortly brought to God. At the age of seventeen, William White While the latter gave him a few spoonsful of began to call sinners to repentance; and for

tea, he looked at her, and said, “They gave twenty years preached the Gospel with great Him vinegar to drink!” “I am persuaded," acceptance and success. He was much esteemed

he impressively added, “that neither death, nor in the village in which he resided; and through

life, nor angels, nor principalities, nor powers, out the Circuit was highly respected as a faith

nor things present, nor things to come, nor ful servant of Christ. For several years he held

height, nor depth, nor any other creature, shall the office of Class-leader, and attended punctu

be able to separate me from the love of God, ally to the duties devolving upon him. During which is in Christ Jesus my Lord ! " the affliction which terminated in death, he was

T. H. mercifully sustained; and although, at times, his mind wandered, there were seasons of mental

October 16th.-At Willoughton, in the Gainsvigour and spiritual consolation, when he gave

borough Circuit, Mr. John Post, aged fiftyto his distressed wife a distinct testimony to his

seven years. For thirty-five years he was an personal interest in Christ, assuring her that he

earnest and devoted member of the Wesleyanwas safely resting on the Rock of Ages.

Methodist Society. Having, at the beginning W. S.

of his career, counted the cost, and being up

held by the grace of Christ, he never swerved, September 16th.--At West-Witton, in the

but held fast his confidence to the end. His Middleham Circuit, Mrs. Elizabeth Rodwell.

afflictions towards the close of life were very In early life she gave her heart to God, and

painful ; but he bore them with lowly submisjoined the Methodist Society, of which she con

sion to the Divine will, and not a murmuring tinued a member and an ornament for nearly

word escaped his lips. He was a man of prayer, forty years. For steadfastness in the faith, spi

and took a deep interest in every department of ritual earnestness, and power in prayer, she be

the work of God. His death was most peaceful eame distinguished. By much communion with

and happy.

S. T. God, she was enabled eminently to serve Him and her generation according to His will. In

November 7th.-At Sunny-Bank, Shipley, her household as a Christian parent, in her class

Mary Jane, the beloved daughter of the Rev. as a faithful leader, and in the village as a

John P. Lockwood. She was converted to God Christian friend, and visiter of the afflicted, she

in early life, and the reality of that great was a power and a blessing. She “ warred a

change was abundantly manifested by her transgood warfare," and passed away saying, "I have

parent simplicity and her high spiritual tone. fought a good fight."

J. B. D.

Modest and retiring, sh shunned publicity; but

her efforts for the spiritual welfare of others were October 5th.–At Mytholmroyd, at the resi

almost unceasing; and, as the result of the dence of his step-daughter, Mrs. Clay, Mr.

Divine blessing upon them, a rich harvest of George Hartley, in his eighty-third year. He

spiritual good has been already reaped, in cases of was the oldest Local preacher in the Sowerby.

sourd conversion. Possessing an arniable dispoBridge Circuit, having entered upon that

sition, and a mind under the control of Christian honourable work in the year 1808. It was under

principle, as well as refined by careful culture, the ministry of the late Rev. Cleland Kirkpat

she won the esteem of all with whom she was rick, when about seventeen years old, that he

associated, and her memory is fragrant. Her was brought to the knowledge of the truth. By

removal was comparatively unexpected; but the reading and study he diligently sought to qualify

river seemed to be crossed at its narrowest part. himself for usefulness; nor did he labour in

She was fully matured for " the inheritance of the vain. When he was the leader of a class of

saints in light;" and her death was in keeping forty members, many years ago, it was his rulo

with her life, -sercne and tranquil. to visit any who had been absent from class twice

J. P. L. in succession. Nor was he satisfied till each obtained a clear sense of acceptance with God,

LONDON: PRINTED BY WILLIAM NICHOIS, 46, HOXTON SQUARE.

« AnteriorContinuar »