Imágenes de páginas
PDF
EPUB

ring the last year to a greater extent, nished,) or forced to skulk in corners, and under circumstances of greater hu- they now see the slave traders again manity, than ever. The Spanish flag sweeping the whole range of coast withhad, it is true, been the only one which out molestation-nay, with an air of could lawfully be engaged in the slave triumph and defiance. It will be long, trade north of the Line ; but its pro- therefore, before they are likely again tection was easily procurable, and the to yield to their former conviction reFrench, Americans, and Portuguese, specting the purposes of the European availed themselves largely of it, al. powers. Even if effectual means should though, as has been already shewn, now be pursued for abolishing the slave where the French had the protection trade, years must probably elapse beof their own settlements, they pre- fore they will be induced to forego the ferred using their own flag-one proof, expectation of its revival. among many others, that the French It would be difficult fully to appreabolition was regarded by those per- ciate the deep and lasting injury insons as a measure which they did not ficted on Northern Africa, by the expect the government of their coun- transactions of the last three years. try to enforce.

This injury, too, will be greater, as in The late treaty with Spain will now, the interior of that country they canit is hoped, to a certain degree, stop not be expected to discriminate, with the desolation of Northern Africa. any accuracy, between the different No flag can now lawfully be employ- nations of Europe. They only know ed in the slave trade on the coast north in general, that the white men, who of the Line ; and the right of search, had ceased to trade in slaves, and who which has been obtained, may there- they understood would trade no more fore be expected to produce on that in that commodity, except as smugcoast, especially if France and Ame- glers, liable to be seized and punished, rica concur in it, the beneficial effect have resumed the open, avowed, and of greatly abridging, if not in time ex. uncontrolled practice of that traffic. tirpating, this traffic. Many years, This afflicting state of things, it however, must elapse before the evils need hardly be observed, has discouproduced by the revival of the slaveraged, and in many instances comtrade on the Windward coast, which pletely crushed, the efforts to extend has followed the peace of Paris, can agriculture and legitimate commerce, be effectually repaired.

which had been produced in this quar. The native chiefs and traders, who ter of the globe by the cessation of the had begun to be convinced that the slave trade. abolition was likely to be permanently Nor is it merely in the way of natumaintained, and that it was therefore ral effect that this result has arisen. absolutely necessary to engage heart. The slave trade of the present day has ily in schemes of cultivation, if they acquired a new character of ferocity. would preserve their influence, have The slave ships come on the coast learnt, from more recent events, to armed, not merely for the ordinary distrust all such appearances.

purpose of their murderous traffic, but Notwithstanding all that had been in order to resist search ; and many said and done ; notwithstanding the bloody scenes have, in consequence of slave trade, for seven or eight years, this determination, been acted of late had either been chased from their in Africa. They appear also to lose shores (from the river Senegal and Si- no opportunity of attacking and de. erra Leone it had been completely ba- stroying the legitimate commerce of

many lives.

the Windward coast, and particularly total number of scholars, male and fe. that of Sierra Leone, which enjoys male, educated in the different schools the proud pre-eminence of being the at Sierra Leone, amounted to 1422,* object of their bitter hatred and im- being an increase of 185 in the preceplacable hostility.

ding six months. The schools were The trade of this colony, therefore, remarkably well attended by the puwith the surrounding districts, which pils generally, who appeared eager to had tended, more than any other cir. reap the benefits of the instruction af. cumstance, to give a steady impulse forded them; and their improvement to the industry of the neighbouring is stated to have been considerable. Datives, has been subjected to much In the Appendix are given, extracts outrage and spoliation, attended, in from the Sierra Leone Gazette of Jasome instances, with great barbarity nuary 30, 10th, and 17th, containing of treatment, and even with the loss of reports of the examinations of the

• schools at Free-town, Regent's-town, A statement relative to the outra- and the Christian Institution, with the ges committed on the innocent traffic general return of free schools. of Africa, by ships engaged in the Of the whole population of the coslave trade, drawn up from authentic lony, a very large proportion consists documents, is given in the Appendix. of liberated captives, distributed in va

The Report proceeds to speak of rious villages, pursuing the occupathe

tions of peaceful industry on farms of

their own, gradually laying aside their Progress of Improvement at Sierra native superstitions, and eager to avail Leone.

themselves of all the means of instruc

tion within their reach. In the midst, however, of this ge. neral gloom and devastation, the Di.

Retrospect. rectors turn, with increasing satisfaction, to one spot on this line of coast. In looking back to the arduous

The accounts received from time to struggle which has been so long maintime of the progress of improvement tained on the behalf of our fellowat Sierra Leone, continue to be high- creatures in Africa and the West Inly favourable. Letters, dated on the dies, the Directors cannot but acknow26th of January last, state, that every ledge that some things have occurred thing in the colony, and in the coun. of a very painful description. They try around it, was at that time going have, in many instances, been compelon well; that the progress of the led to witness the disappointment of schools was rapid, and the improve their hopes; and there have been times ment in the manners and respectabi- when, after all the steps which had hility of the settlers, conspicuous; that therto been taken, the object seemed the captured negroes were also pro- to be almost as remote as ever. But ceeding prosperously ; that trade was of the cause itself, they have never suf. brisk at the colony, and that there fered themselves to despair ; and they was no war in the country around it. can now, with unfeigned satisfaction,

On the 31st of March, 1817, the speak of it as having made a visible

* By a letter received from the governor of Sierra Leone, dated 6th March last, it appears that the grand total of men, women, boys, and girls, then attending schools on the Peninsula of Sierra Leone, did not fall short of 2000.

ring the last year to a greater extent, nished,) or forced to skulk in corners, and under circumstances of greater hu- they now see the slave traders again manity, than ever. The Spanish flag sweeping the whole range of coast withhad, it is true, been the only one which out molestation-nay, with an air of could lawfully be engaged in the slave triumph and defiance. It will be long, trade north of the Line; but its pro- therefore, before they are likely again tection was easily procurable, and the to yield to their former conviction reFrench, Americans, and Portuguese, specting the purposes of the European availed themselves largely of it, ale powers. Even if effectual means should though, as has been already shewn, now be pursued for abolishing the slave where the French had the protection trade, years must probably elapse beof their own settlements, they pre-fore they will be induced to forego the ferred using their own flag-one proof, expectation of its revival. among many others, that the French It would be difficult fully to appre. abolition was regarded by those per- ciate the deep and lasting injury insons as a measure which they did not Alicted on Northern Africa, by the expect the government of their coun- transactions of the last three years. try to enforce.

This injury, too, will be greater, as in The late treaty with Spain will now, the interior of that country they canit is hoped, to a certain degree, stop not be expected to discriminate, with the desolation of Northern Africa. any accuracy, between the different No flag can now lawfully be employ- nations of Europe. They only know ed in the slave trade on the coast north in general, that the white men, who of the Line; and the right of search, had ceased to trade in slaves, and who which has been obtained, may there they understood would trade no more fore be expected to produce on that in that commodity, except as smug, coast, especially if France and Ame- glers, liable to be seized and punished, rica concur in it, the beneficial effect have resumed the open, avowed, and of greatly abridging, if not in time ex. uncontrolled practice of that traffic. tirpating, this traffic. Many years, This afflicting state of things, it however, must elapse before the evils need hardly be observed, has discouproduced by the revival of the slave raged, and in many instances com, trade on the Windward coast, which pletely crushed, the efforts to extend has followed the peace of Paris, can agriculture and legitimate commerce, be effectually repaired.

which had been produced in this quarThe native chiefs and traders, who ter of the globe by the cessation of the had begun to be convinced that the slave trade. abolition was likely to be permanently Nor is it merely in the way of natumaintained, and that it was therefore ral effect that this result has arisen. absolutely necessary to engage heart. The slave trade of the present day has ily in schemes of cultivation, if they acquired a new character of ferocity

. would preserve their influence, have The slave ships come on the coast learnt, from more recent events, to armed, not merely for the ordinary distrust all such appearances.

purpose of their murderous traffic, but Notwithstanding all that had been in order to resist search ; and many said and done; notwithstanding the bloody scenes have, in consequence of slave trade, for seven or eight years, this determination, been acted of late had either been chased from their in Africa. They appear also to lose shores (from the river Senegal and Si- no opportunity of attacking and de. erra Leone it had been completely ba. stroying the legitimate commerce of the Windward coast, and particularly total number of scholars, male and fe. that of Sierra Leone, which enjoys male, educated in the different schools the proud pre-eminence of being the at Sierra Leone, amounted to 1422,* object of their bitter hatred and im- being an increase of 185 in the prece. placable hostility

ding six months. The schools were The trade of this colony, therefore, remarkably well attended by the pu. with the surrounding districts, wbich pils generally, who appeared eager to had tended, more than any other cir- reap the benefits of the instruction af. cumstance, to give a steady impulse forded them; and their improvement to the industry of the neighbouring is stated to have been considerable. natives, has been subjected to much In the Appendix are given, extracts outrage and spoliation, attended, in from the Sierra Leone Gazette of Jasome instances, with great barbarity nuary 30, 10th, and 17th, containing of treatment, and even with the loss of reports of the examinations of the many lives.

schools at Free-town, Regent's-town, A statement relative to the outra. and the Christian Institution, with the ges committed on the innocent traffic general return of free schools. of Africa, by ships engaged in the Of the whole population of the coslave trade, drawn up from authentic lony, a very large proportion consists documents, is given in the Appendix. of liberated captives, distributed in va

The Report proceeds to speak of rious villages, pursuing the occupa. the

tions of peaceful industry on farms of

their own, gradually laying aside their Progress of Improvement at Sierra native superstitions, and eager to avail Leone.

themselves of all the means of instruc

tion within their reach. In the midst, however, of this geDeral gloom and devastation, the Di.

Retrospect. rectors turn, with increasing satisfaction, to one spot on this line of coast. In looking back to the arduous

The accounts received from time to struggle which has been so long maintime of the progress of improvement tained on the behalf of our fellowat Sierra Leone, continue to be high- creatures in Africa and the West Inly favourable. Letters, dated on the dies, the Directors cannot but acknow26th of January last, state, that every ledge that some things have occurred thing in the colony, and in the coun. of a very painful description. They try around it, was at that time going have, in many instances, been compelon well ; that the progress of the led to witness the disappointment of schools was rapid, and the improve. their hopes; and there have been times ment in the manners and respectabi- when, after all the steps which had hility of the settlers, conspicuous ; that therto been taken, the object seemed the captured negroes were also pro- to be almost as remote as ever. But ceeding prosperously; that trade was of the cause itself, they have never suf- . brisk at the colony, and that there fered themselves to despair ; and they was no war in the country around it. can now, with unfeigned satisfaction,

On the 31st of March, 1817, the speaik of it as having made a visible

By a letter received from the governor of Sierra Leone, dated 6th March last, it appears that the grand total of men, women, boys, and girls, then attending schools on the Peninsula of Sierra Leone, did not fall short of 2000.

one thousand two hundred and fifty ties formed at Reading and Henley, dark and ignorant adults; and in a part immediately after the last annual meet. of the kingdom in which the most un- ing, the committee are happy to anwearied efforts are made to exclude the nounce the establishment of one at pure light of heavenly truth, and to Ipswich, for the county of Suffolk, perpetuate the darkness and errors of and another at Liverpool, from which superstition, it may be reasonably and they expect to derive considerable acconfidently expected, that, bythe bless. cession to their funds. ing of God, the most important, ex- It will appear by the statement of tensive, and permanent consequences, the accounts of the Society, that the will result from this branch of the con- debt to the treasurer is not so large as cerns and operations of the Hibernian it was at the time of last annual meetSociety:

ing. The Committee are therefore someThis last observation naturally con. what relieved from the anxiety and emnects itself with the encouragement barrassment which they felt; and they which the Society gives to the practice beg to express their cordial thanks to of reading the Scriptures, among those those auxiliary institutions, and benewho perhaps never before knew that volent individuals, by whose liberality God hath spoken by prophets, by and zeal, an amelioration of the funds apostles, and by his dear Son; that this of the Society has been effected. To word is in their own language, and that the stated subscribers, whose pious it is able to make them wise unto sal- benevolence has consolidated the inte. vation. A correspondent observes, rests, and supported the continued “ Parties for reading the Scriptures exertions of the Society, the Committee multiply: in the vicinity of many of earnestly recommend an attentive conour schools there are meetings for sideration of the succeesful and happy adults ; many of them cannot read, yet

results of their well applied generosithey attend on those who can with the ty. It is presumed, that such a review most earnest attention.”

will be connected with great personal With great pleasure and gratitude gratification, with fervent gratitude to the Committee report the assistance God, and with renewed endeavours to which, in the course of the last year, increase the stated and collateral suphas been rendered to the Society by ports of an institution which has been the kind and zealous exertions of mi- 60 highly honoured and so eminently nisters, the liberality of individuals, blessed. and the co-operation of Auxiliary Institutions.

They feel themselves particularly in. debted to the Rev. Dr Chalmers, by PhiladeLPHIA Society FOR THE whose zealous and successful exertions PROMOTION OF INDUSTRY, Econo. on behalf of the Society in Edinburgh MY, AND GOOD MORALS. and Glasgow, as well as in London, its debt has been considerably reduced, The objects of this Society are suffiand its funds materially benefitted. ciently explained by its title; we shall They have also pleasure in acknow. not, therefore, insert its regulations at ledging the kindness of their friends in large, but merely give a general view Scotland, (particularly in Glasgow and of the plan on which it is formed. Edinburgh) by whose continued and Eight standing committees are anincreased contributions they have been nually elected, whose duties are defined 80 effectually aided.

in the seventh article of the constituIn addition to the Auxiliary Socie- tion, with a distinctness that precludes

« AnteriorContinuar »