History of the United States: From the Discovery of the American Continent, Volumen2

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C.C. Little and J. Brown, 1839

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Página 30 - Men whose life, learning, faith, and pure intent Would have been held in high esteem with Paul, Must now be named and printed heretics By shallow Edwards and Scotch What d'ye call.
Página 382 - on the broad pathway of good faith and good will; no advantage shall be taken on either side, but till shall be openness and love. I will not call you children, for parents sometimes chide their children too severely; nor brothers only, for brothers differ. The friendship between me and you I will not compare to a chain, for that the rains might rust, or the falling tree might break. We are the same as if one man's body were to be divided into two parts ; we are all one flesh and blood.
Página 366 - ... to support power in reverence with the people, and to secure the people from the abuse of power, that they may be free by their just obedience, and the magistrates honourable for their just administration ; for liberty without obedience is confusion, and obedience without liberty is slavery.
Página 383 - Indian hostilities and massacres, which extend- 1688 ed as far as Richmond. Penn came without arms ; he declared his purpose to abstain from violence ; he had no message but peace ; and not a drop of Quaker blood was ever shed by an Indian.
Página 364 - I hope you will not be troubled at your change and the king's choice, for you are now fixed at the mercy of no governor that comes to make his fortune great ; you shall be governed by laws of your own making, and live a free, and, if you will, a sober and industrious people.
Página 332 - Moreover, when the Lord sent me forth into the world, He forbade me to put off my hat to any, high or low; and I was ,/ required to Thee and Thou all men and women, without any respect to rich or poor, great or small.
Página 366 - ... care for men of the highest attainments, even more than the office of correcting evil-doers ; and, without imposing one uniform model on all the world, without denying that time, place, and emergencies may bring with them a necessity or an excuse for monarchical, or even aristocratical institutions, he believed " any government to be free to the people, where the laws rule, and the people are a party to the laws.
Página 380 - Penn did not despair of humanity, and, though all history and experience denied the sovereignty of the people, dared to cherish the noble idea of man's capacity for self-government. Conscious that there was no room for its exercise in England, the pure enthusiast, like Calvin and Descartes, a voluntary exile, was come to the banks of the Delaware to institute
Página 120 - Agent, quoted in the following words ; " they apprehended them to be an invasion of the rights, liberties and properties of the subjects of his Majesty, in the colony, they not being represented in Parliament...
Página 190 - But I thank God there are no free schools, nor printing, and I hope we shall not have these hundred years ; for learning has brought disobedience and heresy and sects into the world, and printing has divulged them, and libels against the best government. God keep us from both...

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