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A carr signifies a chariot of war, or a small carriage of burden.

In the names of druggs and plants, the mistake in a word may endanger life.

Nor undelightful is the ceaseless humm
To him who muses through the woods at noon.

The finn of a fish is the limb, by which he balances his body, and moves in the water.

Many a trapp is laid to insnare the feet of youth.

Many thousand families are supported by the simple business of making matts.

RULE III.

Words ending with y, preceded by a consonant, form the plurals of nouns, the persons of verbs, verbal nouns, past participles, comparatives, and superlatides, by changing y into i; as spy, spies; I carry, thou carriest; he carrieth or carries; carrier, carried; happy, happier, happiest.

The present participle in ing, retains the y, that i may not be doubled; as, carry, carrying ; bury, burying, fc.

But y, preceded by a vowel, in such instances as the above, is not changed; as, boy, boys; I cloy, he cloys, cloyed, &c; except in lay, pay, and say; from which are formed, laid, paid, and said; and their compounds, unlaid, unpaid, &c.

We should subject our fancys to the government of reason.

If thou art seeking for the living amongst the dead, thou wearyest thyself in vain.

If we have denyed ourselves sinful pleasures, we shall be great gainers in the end.

We shall not be the happyer for possessing talents and affluence, unless we make a right use of them.

The truly good mind is not dismaied by poverty, amictions, or death.

RULE IV.

Words ending with y, preceded by a consonant, upon assuming an additional syllable beginning with a consonant, commonly change y into i; as, happy, happily, happiness. But when y is preceded by a vowel, it is very rarely changed in the additional syllable ; as coy, coyly; boy, boyish, boyhood ; annoy, annoyed, annoyance ; joy, joyless, joyful, &c.

Grammar, p. 38. Key, p. 2. It is a great blessing to have a sound mind, uninfluenced by fancyful humours.

Common calamities, and common blessings, fall heavyly upon the envious.

The comelyness of youth are modesty and frankness ; of age, condescension and dignity.

When we act against conscience, we become the destroiers of our own peace.

We may be plaiful, and yet innocent ; grave, and yet corrupt. It is only from general conduct, that our true character can be portraied.

RULE V.

Monosyllables, and words accented on the last syllable, ending with a single consonant preceded by a single vowel, double that consonant, when they take another syllable beginning with a vowel: as, wit, witty; thin, thinnish; to abet, an abettor ; to begin, a beginner.

But if a diphthong precedes, or the accent is on the preceding syllable, the consonant remains single : as, to toil, toiling ; to offer, an offering ; maid, maiden, &c.

Grammar, p. 38. Key, p. 3. When we bring the lawmaker into contempt, we have in effect annuled his laws.

By defering our repentance, we accumulate our sorrows.

The pupils of a certain ancient philosopher, were

Every person and thing connected with self, is apt to appear good and desireable in our eyes.

Errors and misconduct are more excuseable in ignorant, than in well-instructed persons.

The divine laws are not reverseible by those of men.

Gratitude is a forceible and active principle in good and generous minds.

Our natural and involuntary defects of body, are not chargable upon us.

We are made to be servicable to others, as well as to ourselves.

RULE X.

When ing or ish is added to words ending with silent e, the e is almost universally omitted; as, place, placing ; lodge, lodging ; slave, slavish; prude, prudish.

An obligeing and humble disposition, is totally unconnected with a servile and cringeing humour.

By solaceing the sorrows of others, the heart is improved, at the same time that our duty is per-, formed.

Labour and expense are lost upon a droneish spirit.

The inadvertences of youth may be excused, but knaveish tricks should meet with severe reproof.

RULE XI.

Words taken into composition, often drop those letters which were superfluous in their simples : as, handful, dunghil, withal, also, chilblain, foretel.

Grammar, p. 39. Key, p. 5. Love worketh no ill to our neighbour, and is the fullfilling of the law.

That which is sometimes expedient, is not allways so.

The warmth of disputation, destroys that sedatness of mind which is necessary to discover truth.

All these with ceasless praise his works behold,

Both day and night. In all our reasonings, our minds should be sincerly employed in the pursuit of truth.

Rude behaviour, and indecent language, are peculiarly disgracful to youth of education.

The true worship of God is an important and aweful service.

Wisdom alone is truely fair: folly only appears so.

RULE VIII.

Ment, added to words ending with silent e, generally preserves the e from elision; as, abatement, chastisement, incitement, &c. The words judgment, abridgment, acknonledgment, are deviations from the rule.

Like other terminations it changes y into i, when preceded by a consonant ; as, accompany, accompaniment ; merry, merriment.

Grammar, p. 39, Key, p. 4. The study of the English language is making daily advancment.

A judicious arrangment of studies facilitates improvment.

To shun allurments is not hard,
To minds resolv'd, forewarn'd, and well prepar'd.

RULE IX.

Able and ible, when incorporated into words ending with silent e, almost always cut it off: as, Vlame, blamable; cure, curable; sense, sensible, &c. but if cor g soft comes before e in the original word, the e is then preserved in words compounded nith able, as, change, chang cable ; peace, peaceable, &c.

Every person and thing connected with self, is apt to appear good and desireable in our eyes.

Errors and misconduct are more excuseable in ignorant, than in well-instructed persons.

The divine laws are not reverseible by those of men.

Gratitude is a forceible and active principle in good and generous minds.

Our natural and involuntary defects of body, are not chargable upon us.

We are made to be servicable to others, as well as to ourselves.

RULE X.

When ing or ish is added to words ending with silent e, the e is almost universally omitted : as, place, placing ; lodge, lodging ; slave, slavish ; prude, prudish.

An obligeing and humble disposition, is totally unconnected with a servile and cringeing humour.

By solaceing the sorrows of others, the heart is improved, at the same tine that our duty is performed.

Labour and expense are lost upon a droneisb spirit.

The inadvertences of youth may be excused, but knaveish tricks should meet with severe reproof.

RULE XI.

Words taken into composition, often drop those letters which were superfluous in their simples: as, handful, dunghil, withal, also, chilblain, foretel.

Grammar, p. 39. Key, p. 5. Love worketh no ill to our neighbour, and is the fullfilling of the law.

That which is sometimes expedient, is not allways so.

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