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** fpake to every Gentleman and Lady " of the Place ; i. e. To every Gentle" man and to every Lady."

“ I did him a Kindness. He brought “me the News. She gave him the - Letters ; i. e. She gave to him the « Letters."

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The Ellipfis of the Interjection is not very common.

O Pity and Shame!" Milton,

EXAMPLES of the Ellipsis,

“ If good Manners will not justify " my long Silence, Policy, at least, " will. And you must confess, there s is some Prudence in not owning a " Debt one is incapable of paying.

If good Manners will not justify my long Silence, Policy at least will, justify 'it. And you must confess, that, there is fome Prudence in not owning a Debt, which, one is incapable of paying.

Fitzofborne's Letters.

" He

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“ He will often argue, that if this « Part of our Trade were well culti“ vated, we should gain from one Na“ tion; and if another, from another."

He will often argue, that if this part of our Trade were well cultivated, wę should gain from one Nation; and if another, Part of our Trade were well cultivated, we should gain, from another, Nation,

Addison's Spect.

« Could the Painter have made a « Picture of me, capable of your Con“ versation, I should have sat to him is with more Delight than ever I did “ to any Thing in my Life,"

Could the Painter have made a Pico ture of me, which could have been, capable of your Conversation, I should have fat to him with more Delight than ever I did, fit, to any Thing in my Life.

Mr. Locke to Mr. Molyneux,

A fow instances in which perhaps all possible elliptical Words are supplied, - You must renounce the Conversa. • tion of your Friends, and every civil

Duty of Life, to be concealed in “ gloomy and unprofitable Solitude."

You must renounce the Conversation of your Friends, and, you must renounce, every civil Duty of Life, to bo concealed in gloomy, Solitude, and, you must renounce the Conversation of your Friends, and you must renounce every civil Duty of Life, to be concealed in, unprofitable Solitude.

Fitzosborne's Lettersa " When a Man is thoroughly per" suaded that he ought neither to ad“ mire, with for, or pursue any Thing “ but what is actually his Duty; it is “ not in the Power of Seasons, Per“ fons, or Accidents, to diminish his 6. Value."

When a Man is thoroughly persuaded that he ought neither to admire, any Thing but what is actually his Duty to ada mire, and when a Man is thoroughly perfuaded that he ought neither to wish for any Thing but what is actually his Duty

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to wish for, or, when a Man is thoroughly persuaded that he onght not to pursue any Thing but what is actually his Duty, to pursue ; it is not in the Power of Seafons, to diminish his Value, and it is not in the Power of Persons, to diminish bis Value, or it is not in the Power of Accidents, to diminish his Value.

Addison's Spect.

The following Instances are produced to shew the Impropriety of Ellipsis, in some particular Cases.

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“ That learned Gentleman, if he " had read my Essay quite through, " would have found several of his Ob“ je&tions might have been spared.”

It should have been Would have found, that, several of his Objections, &c.

“ I scarce know any part of Natu

ral Philosophy would yield more Variety and Use.

Note. Or, which occurs twice in the el. liptical Sentence above, is rather an Impropriety; it faould have been nor,

Any

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---Any Part of Natural Philosophy, which, would yield more Variety and Use.

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“ You and I cannot be of two Opi“ nions ; nor, I think, any two Men,

used to think with Freedom.",

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-Nor, I think, any two Men, who are, used to think with Freedom.

Mr. Locke to Mr. Molyneux.

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Some Sentences which seem to differ from the common Forms of Construction accounted for on the Suppofition of Ellipfis.

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By preaching Repentance. By the " preaching of Repentance.

Both these are supposed to be proper and synonymous Expreslions, and I cannot but think, the former is an Ellipsis of the latter, in which the Article and the Preposition are both fuppressed by Custom. N

By

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