Imágenes de páginas
PDF
EPUB

1929.) Account of Fobbing and Curringham, Essex.

395 ye yeres underwrytyn, yat is to say, in hande The population of this parish is xx. and atte ye

festes of

ye Invencion of ye about 450, many of whom are carried H.ly Crosse, and Seynt John Baptist, next

away every year by the above-menfr.llowande after ye datte of yis endenture, tioned malady. Its cottages are small be even porcions xul. and thre gownes. and rural, and chiefly compose one And att ye feste of Seynt Hyllary, in ye

street running north and south. There yere of oure Lord Gode mccccxxii. xxll.

are several farms scallered over the And atte ye forsaides festes of ye Invencion of ye Haly Crosse and Seint John Baptist, marshes, of which there is a great next after followande, be even porcions, xul. abundance; to these marshes the ague quilk saides festes schall fall in ye yere of is principally attributed. The Church oure Lord Gode mccccxxiij. and thre stands in the middle of the village, and gownes atte ye saide feste of Seint John. has the highest tower of any Church And atte ye feste of Seint Hillary next after within ten miles, commanding fine yat in ye same yere of oure Lorde xxl. views of the surrounding country. and atte ye saide festes of ye Invencion of ye Here Thames slow gliding thro' a level Haly Crosse next aftire yat quilk sall fall in

plain ye yere of oure Lord Gode Mccccxxiv. xxl. And atte ye saide feste of Seint John Bap- Conducts the eye along its sinuous course

Of spacious meads, with cattle sprinkled o'er, tist next after, in ye same yere of oure

Delighted.

CowPER. Lorde, xxivl, and thre gownes, atte ye same feste of Seynt John, swa yat ye brigs

It forms, therefore, a rery conspi-: be endede and mad be yat tyme. And if

cuous object, being clearly visible from'. atte be unmad, yai sall have bat x marcs, the Kentish bills; it has a peal of five and quan yair werke is finyst and endede, * bells, which enliven the villagers with marcs. And allso ye forsaides Nicholas and their harmony. The Church consists hys felowes sall gyf to ye saides masons atte of a nave, chancel, and south aile, in yair entre, ccc yrene and steele to ye value which there are several monumental of vis. viijd. And ye saides Nicholas and hys felowes schall mak a bige of tre ats ye have been removed, probably by the

stones, from which the brass inlays saide brigg, in ye quilk ye forsaides masons

merciless Puritans,“ either for greedischall wyrke, yat is to say, iiij romes of syelles, and twa henforkes, quilk bige sall

nesse of the brasse, or for that they be made, and covered, and closed, rea

were thought to be antichristian.” On sonably be Fastyogange next comyne. And

the north wall of the chancel (which if itt befall yat ye forsaides Thomas, Johu, is probably the most ancient part of and Robert, and yair servants, have noght the structure) there is a tablet with all yair covenants fulfilde be vi days warnyng

this inscription in Lombardic characaftir ye indenture maks mencion, yat yen ye

ters : saides Nicholas and hys felowes sall pay PUR. LAMUR. JESU. CRIS yeme yair wage daly to ye tyme yat yai T.PRIEZPUR . SA . ALME. Q'l have yair covenantes fulálde. Moreover, Cl. GIST. PATER, NOSTER. ye saides Thomas, John, and Robert, sall ET. AVE. THOMAS . DE. CRAmak ye pilers of ye fore saide brigg ale sub- WEDENE. FUT. APELLE. stanciell in length and bred, bas ite was acorded with ye forsaide John Garett, be a

There is a family named Cruden, at indenture triptit betwene ye saide Nicholas Gravesend. and hyme mad if ye counsell of ye forsaides The font, which possesses Nicholas and hys felowes acord yem yairto. claims to antiquity, is hexagonal, and To ye wytnesse of quilk thing ye parties stands near the western extremity of aboven nemend has sett yaire seale, wryten the nave. The living is a Rectory. atte Catrike in ye feste of Seint Hillary, ye The present Curate holds the benefice yere of oure Lorde King Herrye ye fift after of Corringham, a village about three ye conquest ye nyend.

In dorso. Fuit homo missus a deo cui quarters of a mile distant, in a westerly nomen erat Johannes.

direction. The population is about

250. The Church, which is not so Mr. URBAN,

large as that of Fobbing, consists of a НЕ

in the county of Essex, at the tains some monuments interesting to distance of about twenty-eight miles the antiquary. The following inscripfrom London, ten from Chelmsford,

tion is in the chancel : the county town, and two from the Vic jacet Alicia Brepde, quae obiit banks of the river Thames.

rbijo die Marci, Anno d'ni Mill'mo Although it stands upon a high bill, MCCCCLID. the ague is very prevalent there. Near this is the half-length figure of

some

HOR

398
Account of Horwood, Devonshire.

[May, Mr. URBAN,

by the Pollards, has this in one of the CORWOOD is a small parish in windows : the north of Devon, consisting

“ Orate pro bono statu Joh'is Pollard et of about 800 acres.

It is situated a Wilmote uxoris ejus, qui istam guildam mile south of the turnpike-road lead- fieri fecerunt;" in which he impaleth with ing from Barnstaple to Bideford, and Pollard a griffin rampant in a field Argent, is 54 miles from the former, and 34 which griffin (as they have it) was borne by miles from the latter town. It is a Duke in ffrance, whose daughter one of bounded on the north and east by the their auncestors matched. She being in a parish of Fremington, on the west by nunery; he then serving his Sou'reigne grew Westleigh, and on the south by Alver- so enamoured with her, as he humbly bediscott.

sought ye King to procure him a dispenThe parish is a Rectory, and the ad

sac'on to marry her. Before a window of

which ile Eliz. Pollard lieth intombed, whose vowson, for some generations, has been

p’porc'n in alabaster, with two children on in the family of the present Rector,

each side, elevating her hands, is most cuthe Rev. John Dene, who was instituted in 1803. It is a discharged

riously cut, as any I have seen." living; the yearly value according to

At the side of the window, near the examination is 401. Tenths, 14s. 10d.

monument, on a small stone let into The glebe is about forty-five acres.

the wall, is the following: The Church has a nave and chancel, “ Here rest the bodies of Arthur Pollard and north aile, which is separated from of this parish, esquier, and Johne his wife. the nave and chancel by five pointed

He was buried the 10th of October, 1633. arches, springing from clustered pil- She ye 3 of June, 1622. Requiescant in lars, with capitals, apparently richly pace. carved with heads and foliage, but

In the windows of the north aile are daubed over with repeated coats of many fragments of stained glass; but whitewash. At the west end is a there exist at present no remains of the square embattled tower, containing griffin of Pollard's arms, or of the in. three bells. At the west end of the scription mentioned by Risdon. tower is a handsome Gothic window, The font is more than five feet in under which is an arched door. This height, it is of free-stone, square, holwindow formerly gave light to the lowed, and lined with lead, with a nave, through an arch in the eastern vent at the bottom to let off the water. wall of the tower, which is now closed It rests on a rounded column of freewith lath and plaister. Under the stone, which is placed on a square battlements, on the south side of the base. The cavity within the font is tower, are three escutcheons, but no deep, and wide enough for the immerarms are at present visible,

sion of an infant. The Church is dedicated to St. Mi. The ceiling of the north aile is chael. St. Michael's well, in a field cored, and, before it was lathed and near the Church, was once famous for plastered, must have been very handits efficacy in the cure of sore eyes and The ribs still project with eruptions.

bosses, which appear to have been cuThe seats in the Church are open, riously carved, as does a frieze which and formed of thick oak; on the side runs along both sides of the aile. The pannels are rude carvings of human windows were filled with stained glass. figures, and the emblems of the cruci- On a boss near the east window in fixion of our Saviour, as the lance, the this aile, are the arms of Pollard, such crown of thorns, nails, &c. On one as are on a slab covering the grave of of the pannels near the door are two Anthony Pollard, viz. à chevron be. escutcheons—the arms of Pollard, a tween three mullets. This Anthony chevron between three mullets; an- was buried 1589, and on scrubbing other, a chevron between three escal- away the filth which had covered the lop-shells ; and on another pannel ad- slab, the arms were found as persect joining, two others, a chevron between as when first placed therema kind of ihree birds, and a demi-wolf rising pitchy cement had been run into the out of wavy bars.

arms and inscription which surrounds On a ledge of a window in the north the slab. Nearly in the middle of aile, is a recumbent female figure, this aile are, side by side, two slabs, beautifully executed in alabaster. Ris- about six feet in length, with a cross don says, an isle of the Church built on each, but no inscription.

soine.

1929.)
Account of Horwood, Devonshire.

399 There are nineteen houses in the very peculiar cry of a bird. I looked parish, and 121 inhabitants.

out and saw a small bird hovering in In twenty years, from Jan. 1, 1699, the air, apparently in the deepest disto Dec. 31, 1718, there were baptized tress, and descending nearer and nearer 61; Males 36—Females 25.

to the ground, I suspected to some of Marriages 15.

its young, but I soon saw a stoat imFunerals 46; Males 22—Females 24. mediately before it, whose

eyes seemed In twenty years from Jan. 1, 1799, to be fixed intensely on the bird. I to Dec. 31, 1818. Baptized 98; Males was awaiting the final issue, when 46-Females 52.

some one coming on towards the spot Marriages 17.

the bird few away. The stoat did Funerals 41; Males 19-Females 22. not escape; he had been, as I sup

Horwood throughout its whole ex. posed, too intent on his prey to take tent is a very elevated ridge, stretching timely precautions for his own safety; from east to west, and sloping gently, he was killed. to the north and sonth, to rivulets the The land holders in the parish of boundaries of the parish. A highway, Horwood are, Earl Fortescue. connecting the turnpike roads from The Rev. John Dene; his estates of Barnstaple to Torrington and Bide- Church Horwood, Pen Horwood, and ford, passes along the sunimit of this the advowson, he inherits from the ridge, and affords inany delightful views Pollards. Elizabeth Futts, the grandof ihe surrounding country, of Barn- daughter and heiress of Arthur Pollard, staple Bay, and Lundy Island.

the last possessor of those estates of The substratum is a stiff clay, and that name, was married to John Dene, the soil very shallow. The agricul- the ancestor of the present Rector. ture of the parish is the same with Mr. Thomas Hog, of Appledore; that generally adopted throughout the his estates of East and West Horwood county; viz. pareing and burning with were purchased by his father, a mere forty bushels of lime to an acre, pre- chant of Appledore, of the uncle of viously to the sowing of wheat. The the present Lord Rolle. average crop of wheat is eighteen Horwood affords no rare plants; but bushels per acre, thirty bushels of bar- of some which grow in the neighbourley, and thirty of oats.

hood, below is the habitat. The Exmore sheep are those gene- Pinguicula Lusitanica; Sentellaria rally bred; and the cattle known as minor; Campanula hederacea ; on Torthe North Devon breed are reared in rington Common. this parish in high perfection. A bull Osmunda regalis ; on the banks of bred'in it obtained the prize at a late the river Torrington. agricultural meeting.

Melittis Melissophyllum ; Tulipa No doubt is entertained here of the Sylvestris ; in the woods near Hall. baneful influence of the Barberry bush Bartsia Viscosa ; on the road side on wheat. An old and very intelligent near the three mile-stone from Barnfarmer asserts that he had frequently staple to Bideford. witnessed its pernicious effect in many Rubia peregrina; common in hedges. fields, but more particularly in one Rosa spinosissima ; common in which he rented of Mr. Dene, the hedges. present Rector's father. For many Sibthorpea Europæa ; in and around years, and every year when this field a well near Buckland Brewer. was sown with wheat, he observed a Scirpus Holoschænus; on Braunton partial blight radiating from a point in Boroughs. ihe hedge across the field; his atten- Inula Helenium ; near Brocken tion was at length directed to the Bar- Bridge. berry bush ; it was grubbed up, and, Oxalis corniculata ; near Appledore. though since the field has been repeat; Inscriptions on slabs in Horwood Church. edly sown with wheat, no such partial blight has ever been observed.

Here lyeth Anthony Pollard of Horwood, I cannot refrain from mentioning a

esquier, who deceased the 16 day of June,

Ann. D. N. 1589. circumstance of which I was a witness. I shall merely state what I saw, with.

In the middle of the slab are the out offering any observation. Shaving arms of the Pollards. myself one morning early near the win- On the adjoining slab: dow, my attention was arrested by a Here lyeth Johan Pollard, wyffee of An

HoRe" north of Devon, consisting

398
Account of Horwood, Devonshire.

[May, Mr. URBAN,

by the Pollards, has this in one of the windows;

“ Orate pro bono statu Joh'is Pollard et of about 800 acres. It is situated a

Wilmote uxoris ejus, qui istam guildam mile south of the turnpike-road lead- fieri fecerunt;" in which he impaleth with ing from Barnstaple to Bideford, and Pollard a griffin rampant in a field Argent, is 5$ miles from the former, and 3 which griffin (as they have it) was borne by miles from the latter town. It is a Duke in ffrance, whose daughter one of bounded on the north and east by the their auncestors matched. She being in a parish of Fremington, on the west by nunery; he then serving his Sou'reigne grew Westleigh, and on the south by Alver- so enamoured with her, as he humbly bediscott.

sought ye King to procure him a dispenThe parish is a Rectory, and the ad

sac'on to marry her. Before a window of

which ile Eliz. Pollard lieth intombed, whose vowson, for some generations, has been in the family of the present Rector, each side, elevating her hands, is most cu

p'porc'n in alabaster, with two children on the Rev. John Dene, who was insti: riously cut, as any have seen.” tuted in 1803. It is a discharged living; the yearly value according to

At the side of the window, near the examination is 401. Tenths, 14s. 10d.

monument, on a small stone let into The glebe is about forty-five acres.

the wall, is the following: The Church has a nave and chancel, “ Here rest the bodies of Arthur Pollard and north aile, which is separated from of this parish, esquier, and Johne his wife. the nave and chancel by five pointed He was buried the 10th of October, 1633.

She arches, springing from clustered, pil

3 of June, 1622. Requiescant in Jars, with capitals, apparently richly pace. carved with heads and foliage, but In the windows of the north aile are daubed over with repeated coats of many fragments of stained glass; but whitewash. At the west end is a there exist at present no remains of the square embattled tower, containing griffin of Pollard's arms, or of the inthree bells. At the west end of the scription mentioned by Risdon. tower is a handsome Gothic window, The font is more than five feet in under which is an arched door. This height, it is of free-stone, square, holwindow formerly gave light to the lowed, and lined with lead, with a nave, through an arch in the eastern vent at the bottom to let off the water. wall of the tower, which is now closed It rests on a rounded column of freewith lath and plaister. Under the stone, which is placed on a square battlements, on the south side of the base. The cavity within the font is tower, are three escutcheons, but no deep, and wide enough for the immerarms are at present visible.

sion of an infant. The Church is dedicated to St. Mi- The ceiling of the north aile is chael. St. Michael's well, in a field cored, and, before it was lathed and near the Church, was once famous for plastered, must have been very hand. its efficacy in the cure of sore eyes and soine. The ribs still project with eruptions.

bosses, which appear to have been cuThe seats in the Church are open, riously carved, as does a frieze which and formed of thick oak; on the side runs along both sides of the aile. The pannels are rude carvings of human windows were filled with stained glass. figures, and the emblems of the cruci- On a boss near the east window in fixion of our Saviour, as the lance, the this aile, are the arms of Pollard, such crown of thorns, nails, &c. On one as are on a slab covering the grave of of the pannels near the door are two Anthony Pollard, viz. a chevron beescutcheonsthe arms of Pollard, a tween three mullets. This Anthony chevron between three mullets; an- was buried 1589, and on scrubbing other, a chevron between three escal- away the filth which had covered the lop-shells; and on another pannel ad- slab, the arms were found as perfect joining, iwo others, a chevron between as when first placed there a kind of three birds, and a demi-wolf rising pitchy cement had been run into the wavy bars.

arms and inscription which surrounds On a ledge of a window in the north the slab. Nearly in the middle of aile, is a recumbent female figure, this aile are, side by side, two slabs, beautifully executed in alabaster. Ris- about six feet in length, with a cross don says, an isle of the Church built on each, but no inscription.

out of

1929.)
Account of Horwood, Devonshire.

399 There are nineteen houses in the very peculiar cry of a bird. I looked parish, and 121 inhabitants.

out and saw a small bird hovering in In twenty years, from Jan. 1, 1699, the air, apparently in the deepest disto Dec. 31, 1718, there were baptized tress, and descending nearer and nearer 61; Males 36-Females 25.

to the ground, I suspected to some of Marriages 15.

its young, but I soon saw a stoat imFunerals 46; Males 22_Females 24. mediately before it, whose eyes seemed

In twenty years from Jan. 1, 1799, to be fixed intensely on the bird. I to Dec. 31, 1818. Baptized 98; Males was awaiting the final issue, when 46-Females 52.

some one coming on towards the spot Marriages 17.

the bird flew away. The stoat did Funerals 41; Males 19–Females 22. not escape; he had been, as I sup

Horwood throughout its whole ex. posed, too intent on his prey to take tent is a very elevated ridge, stretching timely precautions for his own safety ; from east to west, and sloping gently, he was killed. 10 the north and sonth, to rivulets the The landholders in the parish of boundaries of the parish. A highway, Horwood are, Earl Fortescue. connecting the turnpike roads from The Rev. John Dene; his estates of Barnstaple to Torrington and Bide Church Horwood, Pen Horwood, and ford, passes along the sunimit of this the advowson, he inherits from the ridge, and affords inany delightful views Pollards. Elizabeth Futts, the grandof the surrounding country, of Barn- daughter and heiress of Arthur Pollard, staple Bay, and Lundy Island.

the last possessor of those estates of The substratum is a stiff clay, and that name, was married to John Dene, the soil very shallow. The agricul- the ancestor of the present Rector. ture of the parish is the same with Mr. Thomas Hog, of Appledore; that generally adopted throughout the his estates of East and West Horwood. couniy; viz. pareing and burning with were purchased by his father, a merforty bushels of lime to an acre, pre- chant of Appledore, of the uncle of viously to the sowing of wheat. The the present Lord Rolle. average crop of wheat is eighteen Horwood affords no rare plants ; but bushels per acre, thirty bushels of bar- of some which grow in the neighbourley, and thirty of oats.

hood, below is the habitat. The Exmore sheep are those gene- Pinguicula Lusitanica ; Sentellaria rally bred; and the cattle known as minor; Campanula hederacea ; on Torthe North Devon breed are reared in rington Common. this parish in high perfection. A bull Osmunda regalis ; on the banks of bred'in it obtained the prize at a late the river Torrington. agricultural meeting.

Melittis Melissophyllum ; Tulipa No doubt is entertained here of the

Sylvestris ; in the woods near Hall. baneful influence of the Barberry bush Bartsia Viscosa ; on the road side on wheat. An old and very intelligent near the three mile-stone from Barnfarmer asserts that he had frequently staple to Bideford. witnessed its pernicious effect in many Rubia peregrina; common in hedges. fields, but more particularly in one Rosa spinosissima ;

in which he rented of Mr. Dene, the hedges. present Rector's father. For many Sibthorpea Europæa ; in and around years, and every year when this field a well near Buckland Brewer. was sown with wheat, he observed a Scirpus Holoschænus; on Braunton partial blight radiating from a point in Boroughs. ihe hedge across the field; his atten- Inula Helenium ; near Brocken tion was at length directed to the Bar. Bridge. berry bush; it was grubbed op, and, Oxalis corniculata ; near Appledore. though since the field has been repeat; Inscriptions on slabs in Horwood Church. edly sown with wheat, no such partial blight has ever been observed.

Here lyeth Anthony Pollard of Horwood, I cannot refrain from mentioning a

esquier, who deceased the 16 day of June, circumstance of which I was a witness. Ann. D. N. 1589. I shall merely state what I saw, with.

In the middle of the slab are the out offering any observation. Shaving arms of the Pollards. myself one morning early near the win- On the adjoining slab: dow, my attention was arrested by a

Here lyeth Johan Pollard, wyffee of An

common

« AnteriorContinuar »