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In one recent instance, however(stated in the Monthly Magazine for October), it appears to have been attended with very happy effects. The Rev. W. Lucas of Doctors' Commons, chaplain to the present Lord Mayor, now at the age of 62, had for nearly 30 years been attacked with the gout; and for the last half of that period, had never been entirely free from it. During theyear 1810, the disease attacked his stomach; and for many months he lost all appetite; and was at last so much extenuated, that he was not expected to live. The Eau Medicinale was recommended. He took at night, half of a small bottle, being about a large tea-spoonful. Its operation, though attended with nausea, was not violent: but the effects have been quite surprising. On the following day, he ate the usual meals heartily; and from that time till now, a period of seven months, his appetite has continued good, and he has remained quite free from the disease which had so long afflicted him.

Mr. James Moore, a surgeon, after many experiments, has stated his opinion, that the Eau Medicinale may be thus produced. “Take of white hellebore root, eight ounces; white wine, two pints and a half: the root to be cut in thin slices, and infused for ten days, occasionally shaking the bottle. Let the infusion be then filtered through paper. The mixture for the Gout to consist of three parts of this wine of white hellebore, and one part of liquid laudanum.”

The following is a statement of the population of London, taken from the recent returns.

Males. Females. Total. . 57,062 59,693 116,755 Westminster . . . 74,538 87,447 162,185 The Borough . . . 28,579 32,590 61,109 Christ Church . . 5,032 6,818 11,050 Lambeth . . . . . 17,935 23,709 41,644 Newington . . . . 10,124 13,729 22,853 Rotherhithe 4,649 6,420 14,069 Holborn Division" 93,958 124,638 218,596 Finsbury Divisiont 37,690 44,576 82,266 Tower Division; .. 75,787 111,606 187,393 Kensington . . . . 4,244 6,642 10,886 Chelsea . . . . . 7,737 10,525 18,262

City of London

945,068

The population of Edinburgh is 44,290 * Including only St. Giles's, St. George's, St. Andrew's, St. Pancras, St. Mary-le-bone, and Paddington. t Including only St. Luke's, St. Sepulchre's, Clerkenwell, and Islington. t Omitting Hackney and Poplar,

males, and 58,853 females—total 103,143" Glasgow contains, males, 49,086; females, 59,744—total, 108,830; being an increase of 23,000 since the last census. Glasgow now ranks the second city in Great Britain in point of population, being 7,000 more than Edinburgh, and 10,000 more than Manchester. A gigantic plan has been announced for converting the river Thames, from Blackwall to the Gallions, and from Deptford to Vauxhall, into docks, for the building, reception, refitting, and repairing, of the royal navy, as well as every description of merchant vessels; and for forming bridges, mills, &c.; besides other works, of great public utility, calculated, according to the projector, to save the public twenty millions per annum. —The projectors require to be enabled to convert the bed of the river, from Blackwall to the Gallions, into a grand naval depôt and arsenal, as well for building and fitting out, as for dismantling and laying up, in perfect security, a large portion of the British navy; and they propose to cut a canal from Long Reach (where ships have deep water at all times) to Woolwich Warren. They propose also to convert the bed of the river between Deptford and Vauxhall, into a dock or basin, for the reception of ships of every description, and to excavate a new channel from Deptford to Vauxhall, for the current of the Thames, (which is intended to be of sufficient depth and breadth to allow the passage of vessels of all descriptions.) And further, to cut a tide river immediately above the dam at Blackwall to a point inInediately below that at the Gallions. A skilful invention has just been introduced into our dock-yards, for making cables for the heaviest ships of spring chains, so skilfully wrought in iron as to be stronger and more durable than rope cable can possibly be made; and two or three line of battle ships are said to be already equipped with these iron cables. Families brewing their own malt liquor may use, it is said, 32\bs. of brown sugar with two bushels of malt, which will produce fifty gallons of ale, as good in every respect as is made from six bushels of malt, effecting a saving of 31s. 8d. The sugar is mixed with the wort as it runs from the mash-tub. By an Act of Parliament lately passed, an incumbent of any living is empowered to borrow at four per cent. of commissioners appointed for that purpose, twice the amount of the net annual income of his living, for the purpose of building a new, or improv$ his old parsonage-house. This sum, low

same with that of the British and Foreign Bible Society, viz. “to encourage the circulation of the Holy Scriptures without note or comment; and especially to supply the demands of the native Christians in India, computed to be nearly a million, including those in the island of Ceylon.” Near 16,000 rupees had been previously subscribed in aid of the objects of the British and Foreign Bible Society. Among the subscribers, we perceive, with great satisfaction, the names of General Hewett, the Commander in Chief, and first member of the Supreme Council, for 2000 rupees; of John Lumsden, Esq. second member of the Supreme Council; of Sir John Royds and Sir William Burroughs, judges of the Supreme Court; and many other highly respectable characters. Of the newly instituted society, John Herbert Harrington, Esq. judge of the Suddar Dewannee and Nizamut Adawluts, president of the College Council, and professor of laws, has been appointed the president; –George Udny, Esq. a member of the Board of Trade, and late a member of the Supreme Council, and N. B. Edmonstone, Esq. chiefsecretary of the Government, vice-presidents;–J.D. Alexander, Esq. treasurer; –and the Rev. David Brown, senior chaplain of the presidency, secretary. At the first meeting of the committee of this new society, it was resolved, “ that the objects pointed out in the sermon preached by the Rev. Henry Martyn on the 1st of January, be taken into immediate consideration, and that the secretary be requested to make the necessary inquiries, by opening a correspondence with the different parts of India.” It was also resolved, that measures should be taken for making the objects of the institution generally known, with a view to obtaining benefactions and subscriptions. A letter has been received by Lord Teignmouth from Mr. Harrington, the president of the Cal•utta Bible Society, with a large ex

tract from which we shall proceed to gratify our readers. It is dated 25th February 1811. “Our first attention will be given to the objects of a sermon preached by the Rev. Henry Martyn, at the commencement of the present year; and I may add that the interest excited by this excellent discourse, for the welfare of so large a number as nearly a million of our Christian brethren, in actual want of the Bible, has, under the direction of a gracious Providence, contributed essentially to the formation ofcursociety.” “I understand, that, in addition to the liberal encouragement already given by the British and Foreign Bible Society to the diffusion of the Gospel in the languages of Asia, a further aid, for the same beneficent purpose, has been voted of two thousand pounds per annum for three years. Uncertain as we are at present what the annual amount of benefactions and subscriptions to the funds of the Calcutta Auxiliary Bible Society may be, I feel reluctant to hazard the impeding, instead of promoting, the common object of our association, and that established in London, by suggesting that any part of this intended supply may now be dispensed with. Adverting, however, to the donations made last year for the purchase of Tamul Bibles, and to those already received this year, towards the object of our newly instituted society, I may venture to assure you, that a sum, at least equal to that intended to be sent from England, will, if it please God to bless our undertaking, be now raised on the spot, within the same period. I hope also, that our example will be followed by the institution of auxiliary societies, for the same Christian object, at Madras, Bombay, and Columbo ; though, on this point, I have no authority to express more than a hope. You will therefore be able to judge, according to the calls upon your truly catholic benevolence in other parts of the world, whether it be proper to withhold any part of

the pecuniary aid which you designed for India, or to let the inhabitants of this extensive region still have the full benefit of your bounty to them, in addition to what they may receive from others. “But your views of universal good are not confined to the limits of India, which, for a time at least, until the whole of its Christian inhabitants are supplied from their local source, must be the principal, if not exclusive, field of our exertions. It will be a work of years to supply the demand which now exists for the word of God amongst the difserent denominations of Indian Christians; and it must be our constant duty to watch for, and meet, any future demand, as it may arise. Whether we shall ever attempt more than this, must depend on circumstances; and especially upon the continued zeal with which our institution may be supported.” “Were I authorized to offer an opinion, it should be, that the stream of your charity be still allowed to flow towards the East, and especially to fertilize those countries which have not an appropriate spring, The wide and populous empire of China appears, in particular, to call for your continued aid to the praiseworthy missionaries at Serampore, who, by zealous perseverance, have overcome the difficulties of acquiring the Chinese language; have already published a dissertation on the characters and sounds of that language, with a volume of the works of Confucius; and are engaged in a Chinese translation of the New tstanent. “I will not attempt to give you any particular information of the Progress made in the great work of Publishing correct editions of the §:riptures in the Asiatic languages. Mr. Brown, who corresponds regu*ly with Mr. Owen, add who, you will be glad to see, is secretary to **ociety, bas, I doubt not, anticigoed every thing I could say on * subject; and his communica* cannot fail of being satisfacChrist. Ossexv. No. 118.

tory. The correct and idiomatic Hindoostanee version of the New Testament, made by the united labours of Mr. Martyn and Mirza Fitrut, will be an important acquisition to literature, as well as religion; and I am happy to hear, that it will be immediately printed. “I will only add, that, with a view to assure the Governor General in Council of our strict adherence to the defined object of our institution, and to furnish him, at all times, with full information of the proceedings of the society and its committee, it was wished to invest the chief secretary to the Government with the office of president; but the entire occupation of his time, by his important duties, prevented his acceptance of that trust, which has consequently devolved to me. You will observe, however, that Mr. Edmonstone is one of the vice-presidents; and he has undertaken to keep the Government regularly informed of our proceedings. This precaution was not perhaps necessary, as duty and interest must equally preclude the adoption of any measure not persectly consistent with our political safety. But it will be satisfactory to ourselves, as well as to others, that the whole of our proceedings are known to the Government; and it will, I hope, stifle the voice of objection from those who are ready to take alarm at every attempt, however legitimate and unexceptionable, to propagate Christianity in India. “Whether the persevering and zealous endeavours of our filial association will ultimately contribute, in any effectual degree, to the primary object of your parental and fostering society, must depend upon a higher Power than that ef man, or of combinations of men. We know, from Divine authority, that ‘except the Lord build the house, they labour in vain that build it;’ and that although “Paul may plant, and Apollos water, it is God that giveth the increase.' I feel persuaded, however, that, by his grace, some

thing will be done in Asia, as well as in Furope, towards the spread of the glad tidings of his Gospel over the earth; and if no other good should proceed from our Auxiliary Bible Society at this presidency, it will, I trust, be blessed, to render the members of it more sensible of the inestimable value of what Mr. Martyn emphatically calls, next to the Saviour, God's best gift to man,’ for their own salvation and happiness.” We are unwilling to weaken the impression which the perusal of this truly Christian letter must have pro

duced on the minds of our readers. by any comments of our own. We cannot close the present article. however, without particularly recommending the consideration. of Mr. Harrington's letter, of Mr. Martyn's sermon, and of the proceedings to which that sermou appears to have given birth, to Major Scott Warino, the Bengal Officer, and all the Anglo-Indians who have joined them, in sounding the alarm against the exertions of missionaries, and the circulation of the Scriptures, as if these would infallibly overthrow our empire in the East.

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LITERARY AND PHILOSOPHICAL INTELLIGENCE, &c. &c.

GREAT BRITAIN.

is the press: A Journey through Persia, Asia Minor, &c. by James Morrier, Esq. Secretary of Embassy to the Court of Persia;-The Analogies and Anomalies of the Hebrew Language considered, particularly in Relation to the Greek and Latin Languages, by T.Thomas of Wareham –A History of the Royal Society, by Dr Thomas Thomson;–A Translation of Mad. De Genlis's Histoire des Femines Françaises les plus célébres, &c.;— and, Lectures on the Pastoral Character, by the late Dr. Campbell of Aberdeen, edited by Dr. Frazer.

Preparing for publication: A Review of the History of the Military Sciences, and Politics of War, from the earliest Period to the Year 1809, in monthly Parts, at 5s by W. Müller;-and, A Work on the ancient Costume of England, from the Ninth to the Sixteenth Century: the Designs by C. Hamilwu, Esq.; the Engravings by Mr. J. A. Atkinson, and Mr. Meugor.

There has lately been a large importation of French works, by Debotte, Dulau, and Deconcey.

Mr. Boothroyd has just finished the third part of Biblia Hebraica, or Hebrew Bible, without points, in 4to. The fourth part, which will complete the Pentateuch, is at press, and may be expected in the course of the month.

Mr. Frey has completed the second part of

Van der Hooght's Hebrew Bible, with points, in 8vo. and is going on with the subsequent parts. The work will not be advanced to subscribers, though, from its increased expenses, it must be raised to non-subscribers after No. 1. Among the precious MSS. of the Oriental library of Monte-Casino, there has just been found a Greek MS. of Apollonius Evander, the nephew of Apollonius of Rhodes— Among other important objects which this MS. contains, is a very detailed account of the eruption of Vesuvius in the reign of Titus. A learned Helenist will soon give a translation of this work, with the Greek opposite to it. In the library of York Minster, there is a copy of the first edition of Erasmus's Greek and Latin Testament, 1516, folia, upon vellum. A mission from the Dilletanti Society is on the eve of departing, under the sanction of Government, in a Turkish frigate, destined for Smyrna. Its object is to make diligent search for antiquities and ancient relics, in Asia Minor and the lonian isles. A young architect and a draftsman, of very superior talents, has abandoned a lucrative office, to aid the views and objects of this society. Many varying opinions have been express. ed respecting the virtues of the Eau Medicinale of Husson, as a remedy for the soul and several cases are stated to have occurred which are of a nature to discredit its efficacy. In onerecent instance, however(stated in the Monthly Magazine for October), it appears to have been attended with very happy ef. setts. The Rev. W. Lucas of Doctors' Commons, chaplain to the present Lord Mayor, now at the age of 62, had for nearly 30 years been attacked with the gout; and for the last half of that period, had never been entirely free from it. During theyear 1810, the disease attacked his stomach; and for many months he lost all appetite; and was at last so much extenuated, that he was not expected to live. The Eau Medicinale was recommended. He took at night, half of a small bottle, being about a large tea-spoonful. Its operation, though attended with mausea, was not violent : but the effects have been quite surprising. On the following day, he ate the usual meals heartily; and from that time till now, a period of sewn months, his appetite has continued good, and he has remained quite free from the disrose which had so long afflicted him. Mr. James Moore, a surgeon, after many experiments, has stated his opinion, that the Eau Medicinale may be thus produced. "Take of white hellebore root, eight ounces; white wine, two pints and a half: the root to be cut in thin slices, and infused for on days, occasionally shaking the bottle. Let the infusion be then filtered through paPer. The mixture for the Gout to consist of three parts of this wine of white hellebore, and one part of liquid laudanum.” The following is a statement of the population of London, taken from the recent returns. Males. Females. Total.

City of London . 57,062 59,693 116,755 Westminster . . . 74,538 87,447 162,185

The Borough . . . 28,579 32,590 61,109 Christ Church .. 5,032 6,818 11,050 Lambeth . . . . . 17,935 23,709 41,644 Newington . . . . 10,124 13,729 22,853 Rotherhithe . . . 4,649 6,420 14,069

Holborn Division" 93,958 124,638 218,596 Finsbury Division? 37,690 44,576 82,266 Tower Division; .. 75,787 111,606 187,393 Kensington . . . . 4,244 6,642 10,886 Chelsea. . . . . 7,737 10,525 18,262

945,068

The population of Edinburgh is 44,290 "Including only St. Giles's, St. George's, St. Andrew's, St. Pancras, St. Mary-le-bone, and Paddington. * Including only St. Luke's, St. Sepulore's, Clerkenwell, and Islington. t Omitting Hackney and Poplar,

males, and 58,853 females—total 103,143" Glasgow contains, males, 49,086; females, 59,744—total, 108,830; being an increase of 23,000 since the last census. Glasgow now ranks the second city in Great Britain in point of population, being 7,000 more than Edinburgh, and 10,000 more than Manchester. A gigantic plan has been announced for converting the river Thames, from Blackwall to the Gallions, and from Deptford to Vauxhall, into docks, for the building, reception, refitting, and repairing, of the royal navy, as well as every description of merchant vessels; and for forming bridges, mills, &c.; besides other works, of great public utility, calculated, according to the projector, to save the public twenty millions per annum. —The projectors require to be enabled to convert the bed of the river, from Blackwall to the Gallions, into a grand naval depôt and arsenal, as well for building and fitting out, as for dismantling and laying up, in perfect security, a large portion of the British navy; and they propose to cut a canal from Long Reach (where ships have deep water at all times) to Woolwich Warren. They propose also to convert the bed of the river between Deptford and Vauxhall, into a dock or basin, for the reception of ships of every description, and to excavate a new channel from Deptford to Vauxhall, for the current of the Thames, (which is intended to be of sufficient depth and breadth to allow the passage of vessels of all descriptions.) And further, to cut a tide river immediately above the dam at Blackwall to a point inmediately below that at the Gallions. A skilful invention has just been introduced into our dock-yards, for making cables for the heaviest ships of spring chains, so skilfully wrought in iron as to be stronger and more durable than rope cable can possibly be made; and two or three line of battle ships are said to be already equipped with these iron cables. Families brewing their own malt liquor may use, it is said, 32 lbs. of brown sugar with two bushels of malt, which will produce fifty gallons of ale, as good in every respect as is made from six bushels of malt, effecting a saving of 31s. 8d. The sugar is mixed with the wort as it runs from the mash-tub. By an Act of Parliament lately passed, an incumbent of any living is empowered to borrow at four per cent. of commissioners appointed for that purpose, twice the amount of the net annual income of his living, for the purpose of building a new, or improv$ his old parsonage-house. This sum, how

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