Women's Roles in the Renaissance

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Greenwood Publishing Group, 2005 - 335 páginas

For the first time, a content-rich survey on Renaissance women for students and the general public is available. The story of the Renaissance has usually been told from the elite male perspective. Here, the lives of women and girls from a wide range of classes, religions, and countries in Europe take center stage. Women had a significant impact on the economy, social structures, and the culture of the Renaissance, despite the constraints on their exercise of power, lack of opportunities, enforced dependence, and exclusion from politics, government, science, law, banking, and more. Women's Roles in the Renaissance examines the attitudes and practices that shaped the varied roles of women then, but also the important ways women shaped the world in which they lived. The focus is on both the ideas that circulated about women and on the difference between representations of them and their everyday life experiences.

The narrative draws from a wide variety of sources on every aspect of women's lives. Narrative topical chapters cover women and education, the law, work, politics, religion, literature, the arts, and pleasures. Numerous women are profiled, and a plethora of quotations and examples of their work provides a sense of their spirit. Many period illustrations are included that highlight the text. This will prove to be a most valuable one-volume resource on a high-interest topic.

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great book I love it.

Contenido

VI
27
VII
53
VIII
89
IX
125
X
153
XI
195
XII
241
XIII
277
XIV
303
XV
321
Derechos de autor

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Términos y frases comunes

Pasajes populares

Página 19 - For a man indeed ought not to cover his head, forasmuch as he is the image and glory of God : but the woman is the glory of the man.
Página 19 - Let your women keep silence in the churches : for it is not permitted unto them to speak ; but they are commanded to be under obedience, as also saith the law.
Página 151 - and tell you a truth, which perchance ye will marvel at. One of the greatest benefits that ever God gave me, is, that he sent me so sharp and severe parents, and so gentle a schoolmaster. For when I am in presence either of father or mother; whether I speak, keep silence, sit, stand, or go, eat, drink, be merry, or sad, be sewing, playing, dancing, or doing...
Página 133 - I know I have the body but of a weak and feeble woman ; but I have the heart and stomach of a King, and of a King of England too...
Página 19 - Wives, submit yourselves unto your own husbands, as unto the Lord. For the husband is the head of the wife, even as Christ is the head of the church : and he is the saviour of the body. Therefore as the church is subject unto Christ, so let the wives be to their own husbands in every thing.
Página 80 - And it should be noted that there was a defect in the formation of the first woman, since she was formed from a bent rib, that is, a rib of the breast which is bent as it were in a contrary direction to a man. And since through this defect she is an imperfect animal, she always deceives.
Página 20 - For Adam was first formed, then Eve. And Adam was not deceived, but the woman being deceived was in the transgression.
Página 19 - But I suffer not a woman to teach, nor to usurp authority over the man, but to be in silence.
Página 142 - Duchess, with all the household, gentlemen and gentlewomen, were hunting in the park. I found her in her chamber reading...
Página 55 - The husband also, by the old law, might give his wife moderate correction. For, as he is to answer for her misbehaviour, the law thought it reasonable to intrust him with this power of restraining her, by domestic chastisement, in the same moderation that a man is allowed to correct his apprentices or children; for whom the master or parent is also liable in some cases to answer.

Acerca del autor (2005)

Meg Lota Brown is Professor of English at the University of Arizona, Tucson.

Kari Boyd McBride is Associate Professor and Undergraduate Director in the Women's Studies Department, Faculty Affiliate in the Department of English, and Director of the Group for Early Modern Studies at the University of Arizona, Tucson.

Información bibliográfica