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“ tain, that a verb, which in the active chap. “ voice fignifies to commit iniquity, may in 1. “ the passive signify to suffer for iniquity :" and hence it is, that nouns from such “ verbs sometimes signify iniquity, fome“ times punishment. The grammatical fig* nification being thus made clear, we are « prepared for abolishing our translation, " if be commit iniquity, and also for adopt« ing the true one-even in his suffering for iniquity. The Messiah, who is thus “ the person possibly here spoken of, will o be still more manifest, from the whole “ verse thus translated. I will be his father, and be shall be my son: even in his “ suffering for iniquity, I Mall chaften him 6. with the rod of men, (with the rod due to men and with the stripes of (due to) the children of Adam. And this construction “ is well supported by Isaiah liii. 4, 5. He hath carried our sorrows (i. e. the for" rows due to us, and which we must ot berwife have suffered) he was wounded for

our transgresions, he was bruised for our iniquities: the chastisement of our peace was upon him, and with his stripes we are 6 healed.

There are no further limitations of the
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secr. promised seed, after the time of David; 111. nor' was it known from what particular

member of his family the Meffiah was destined to spring, till the event itself took place.

СНАР.

• CHA P. II.

PROPHECIES RELATING TO THE OFFICE

AND CHARACTER OF THE MESSIAH, THE
CALL OF THE GENTILES, AND THE RE-

JECTION OF THE JEWS. I. CONTAINED · IN THE PSALMS. 2. ISAIAH. 3. JEREMIAH. 4. EZEKIEL. 5. DANIEL, 6. AMOS. 7. MICAH. 8. HAGGAI. 9. ZECHARIAH, 10. MALACHI.

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relating to ne office and character of the Mera

'T HE prophecies, which have hitherto been Prophecies considered, are rather declarative of the th birth of the Meffiah in some particular family, than descriptive of his office and cha- fan. Men racter. The last indeed does briefly touch call of the upon his sufferings ; but the others merely and the remention his manifestation, and the con- the Jews. version of the Gentiles to his religion. At the era of David a new species of prophecy commences; a greater degree of precision is adopted; and the picture of the promised Redeemer glows in the write ings of the Hebrew bards, with as vivid colours, as if it had been painted by an eye-witness. His death and sufferings are distinctly pointed out; his burial and glo

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sect. rification are each minutely described ; and III. the conversion of the Gentiles is expressly

– foretold.

As the prophecies, which connect the Law and the Gospel, are scattered through the whole of the latter part of the sacred Volume, they do not strike upon the mind so forcibly, as when surveyed in the short compass of a few pages. Hence, it will be necessary to bring them together into one point of view. Separated, they are like stars, bright indeed, yet capable of being easily overlooked ; united, they form a radiant constellation, which the eyes cannot avoid beholding, unless wilfully closed against the light of truth.

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1. Few of the Prophets are more copious and accurate in their predictions than David, the illustrious type and progenitor of the Messiah. He sometimes breaks out into rapturous effusions of joy, at foreseeing the triumph of Christ; and again melts us into tears of gratitude, when he weeps over his agonizing pains, and the blind cruelty of his countrymen.

In the second Psalm we meet with an

exact

exact description of the conquest of Christ, chap. over all the opposition, which the incensed II. rulers of the world could make to his religion. Though imperial Rome raged to see its progress, and though the chief priests and Pharisees took counsel together, still did the word of God prevail against both. The Heathen are now become the inheritance of Christ, and the uttermost parts of the earth his possession. This victory indeed was not atchieved without a violent struggle; but both the Romans and the Jews paid dearly for their resistance and perfecuting spirit. Divine vengeance “ broke them with a rod of iron, and “ dashed them in pieces like a potter's “ vessel.” The destruction of Jerusalem, and the dispersion of the Jews, foon followed their rejection of Christ: and as for the Romans, through whose power the Messiah had been put to an ignominious death, and who were stained with the blood of the martyrs Thed in ten dreadful persecutions, where is now their mighty empire? The most brittle earthen-ware could not be more completely dashed in pieces by the blow of a rod of iron, than the widely diffused powers of the Romans.

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