Art and Art Industries in Japan

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Virtue and Company, limited, 1878 - 292 páginas
 

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Página 243 - And they had breastplates, as it were breastplates of iron: and the sound of their wings was as the sound of chariots of many horses running to battle.
Página 21 - I now offer to the public a short essay, accompanied with two explanatory prints, in which I shall endeavour to shew what the principles are in nature, by which we are directed to call the forms of some bodies beautiful, others ugly; some graceful, and others the reverse...
Página 238 - And all the greatest art which the world has produced is thus fitted for a place, and subordinated to a purpose. There is no existing highest-order art but is decorative. The best sculpture yet produced has been the decoration of a temple front — the best painting, the decoration of a room. Raphael's best doing is merely the wall-colouring of a suite of apartments in the Vatican, and his cartoons were made for tapestries.
Página 164 - ... the immortality of the soul, upon which it depends. Both in China and Japan the departed spirit is invested with the power of revisiting the earth, and, in a visible form, tormenting its enemies and haunting those places where the perishable part of it mourned and suffered. Haunted houses are slow to find tenants, for ghosts almost always come with revengeful intent ; indeed, the owners of such houses will almost pay men to live in them, such is the dread which they inspire, and the anxiety to...
Página 103 - The fact is, there are only two fine arts possible to the human race, sculpture and painting. What we call architecture is only the association of these in noble masses, or the placing them in fit places.
Página 130 - I must also differ from him when he says, " The landscapes are very quaint, aerial perspective seeming beyond their powers, except in one or two cases where white mists have been attempted, as also rain, fog, and snow. In depicting clouds the Japanese artist seems sorely puzzled— the tinted ribbons they stretch across the heavens looking like labels for inscriptions rather than floating vapours." In respect to this, it may be observed that clouds and sea receive a purely conventional mode of treatment,...
Página 150 - The eye hath this sort of enjoyment in winding walks, and serpentine rivers, and all sorts of objects, whose forms, as we shall see hereafter, are composed principally of what I call, the waving and serpentine lines.
Página 42 - ... repetition palls, but also through the recognition of the feeling, as being like what had been felt before. That enjoyment should accrue from the perception of similarities is scarcely less important than the gratification of variety, because we thus learn to classify the objects of our knowledge. But mere likeness without difference becomes distasteful sameness or dull uniformity, — just as mere variety without likeness would be intolerable ; for in this case there would be a number of insulated...
Página 276 - It must of necessity be, that even works of Genius, like every other effect, as they must have their cause, must likewise have their rules ; it cannot be by chance that excellences are produced with any constancy or any certainty, for this is not the nature of chance...
Página 245 - ... akin to his tastes, and a source of happiness to all concerned," than in the case of the English mechanic. Mr. Jarves says it was so (for he speaks in the past tense), because, " besides the domestic satisfaction of being always at home, in a congenial circle of qualified critics and co-labourers, his own spirit unconsciously imbibed in more or less degree some of the purity, poetry, and refinements of the motives which actuated his Art — derived in general from the ever-bountiful landscape...

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