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he must be God-even in the full sense of the word— “ God over all, blessed for evermore." Observe, further, that as the temple at Jerusalem was laid in ruins by the Roman army under the conduct of Titus, so it has never since been restored. For when Julian the Apostate employed workmen for that purpose, it is said that an earthquake overthrew what they had begun, and fire-balls out of the earth destroyed the builders; so that these words may be appropriated to Christ, “Behold the former things are come to pass, and new things do I declare; before they spring forth, I tell you of them."

SERMON XIII.

THE MUTUAL GLORY OF CHRIST AND HIS

PEOPLE.

JOHN XVII. 22.

And the glory which thou hast given me have I given unto them.

ANIMATING and encouraging words to all the faithful followers of the Redeemer! In the solemn address which Christ here makes to his father, he not only requests blessings for his disciples, but enumerates some of those which he had already bestowed.—“ The glory which thou hast given me have I given them." From these words, let us consider,

1. The blessing bestowed. Glory is the most comprehensive word in the English tongue ;—the things implied in it exceeding the bounds of imagination, and all powers of expression. Here the understanding of man must fail, the tongue of an angel falter. It is not said, “ grace," but

glory,” for which grace must prepare the soul. What, then, is the glory of earthly kingdoms and crowns, when compared with the glory here spoken of? A man must have been in glory before he can tell what glory is; nay, the apostle Paul, who had been there, speaks of it as unutterable and undescribable.

2. The manner in which it is imparted. It is given, not as the fruit of merit or purchase, not obtained by entreaty or extorted by violence, but the result of incomChrist, which he possesses himself, and has purchased for them. He dearly bought it, and freely bestows it. “I give unto them eternal life.” It comes through those hands which were nailed to the cross, not as a recompense for previous services, but as a gracious and voluntary gift.

3. The order observed. It is first given unto Christ, for the Father hath loved the Son, and given all things to him, -and then he gives it to his disciples. It was given to him that he might preserve it. He gives it to them that they might be for ever happy in the possession of it. Here we behold his faithfulness both to Him that appointed him, and to those for whom he was appointed; for he received to bestow, that he might have the honour of giving, and his people the benefit of enjoying. We here also perceive the greatness of his love, his divine benevolence, and his rich bounty; to which I may add, his infinite fulness. He had glory enough for himself, and to distribute to all his saints, through time and eternity.

4. The certainty of its bestowment. Our Lord does not say, “ I will give;" for then we might possibly fear an alteration of his mind; but, “ I have given.” It is already done; they have it in hand—at least, they have a part of it, which is both a specimen of what it is, and an earnest of that which is behind : nay, it is all made over to them in the covenant, secured to them in the promise, and lodged with me for their use. “O my God and Father! I have made myself responsible to them and to thee. My fidelity is their security."

I shall further notice the nature of Christ's glory, and then some particular instances in which this glory is bestowed upon the saints.

I. I am to notice the nature of Christ's glory: and how little can that be explained which is so little understood ! However, give me leave to observe,

1. There is the essential glory of Christ ;-his glory, as the second Person of the ever-blessed and adorable Trinity. “ We beheld his glory," says the apostle, “as of the only

begotten of the Father.” The glory of deity shone through the veil of humanity. He was, and he appeared to be, the image of the invisible God. His disposition, words, and works; the sermons he preached, and the miracles he performed; all showed who and what he was. In him the eternal and incomprehensible Jehovah displayed his glory in such a manner, that we might admire, and yet not be overwhelmed with it. “Here," as one expresses it, “ God and man, finite and infinite, temporal and eternal, met in conjunction, that the human nature of Christ might be the theatre for the divine nature to show its perfections in.” But this glory cannot be intended in my text; for it was neither derived by Christ from another, nor could it be communicated by him to others; it was alike essential and peculiar to himself.

2. There is Christ's mediatorial glory,—the glory which he has as a middle person between God and man. In this respect he is indeed “ more glorious and excellent than the mountains of prey." The angels gave him glory at his birth and resurrection; extraordinary honours were paid him by the wise men, who, directed by a star, came to the place where he was, worshipped the infant Jesus, and presented him with gold, frankincense, and myrrh; by the multitude who attended him at his triumphant entrance into Jerusalem; and, finally, by the centurion, who, convinced by the extraordinary occurrences at his crucifixion, cried out, “ Truly this was the Son of God.” But the glory spoken of in my text was the glory which the Father had given him,—the glory of working miracles,—which he imparted to his immediate followers; the glory of preaching the gospel, and thereby converting sinners to himself, which he bestows on his faithful ministers; and the glory of sonship, of which all the saints are made partakers. Christ is glorious in the constitution of his person, and the offices which he executes. His satisfaction is glorious, and the rest he affords to his people is glorious too. There was a singular glory in all his sufferings and performances. Now, though the saints

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Christ, which he possesses himself, and has purchased fo
them. He dearly bought it, and freely bestows it.
unto them eternal life." It comes through those hand :
which were nailed to the cross, not as a recompense foi
previous services, but as a gracious and voluntary gift.

3. The order observed. It is first given unto Christ, for the Father hath loved the Son, and given all things to him,—and then he gives it to his disciples. It was given to him that he might preserve it. He gives it to them that they might be for ever happy in the possession of it. Here we behold his faithfulness both to Him that appointed him, and to those for whom he was appointed; for he received to bestow, that he might have the honour of giving, and his people the benefit of enjoying. We here also perceive the greatness of his love, his divine benevolence, and his rich bounty; to which I may add, his infinite fulness. He had glory enough for himself, and to distribute to all his saints, through time and eternity.

4. The certainty of its bestowment. Our Lord does not say, “ I will give;" for then we might possibly fear an alteration of his mind; but, “ I have given.” It is already done; they have it in hand—at least, they have a part of it, which is both a specimen of what it is, and an earnest of that which is behind : nay, it is all made over to them in the covenant, secured to them in the promise, and lodged with me for their use. "O my God and Father! I have made myself responsible to them and to thee. My fidelity is their security.”

I shall further notice the nature of Christ's glory, and then some particular instances in which this glory is bestowed upon the saints.

1. I am to notice the nature of Christ's glory: and how little can that be explained which is so little understood ! However, give me leave to observe,

1. There is the essential glory of Christ;-his glory, as the second Person of the ever-blessed and adorable Trinity. “ We beheld his glory," says the apostle, “as of the only

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