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so he found the foreman and Mr. Newsome waiting for him. He was confounded when he heard what had happened; but, of course, he denied having ever touched the articles which had been found in his box. Moreover he was quite certain that when he left the shop in the morning his box was securely locked.

With some difficulty the foreman prevailed upon Mr. Newsome to let the thing stand over; and Morton was told that for the present at least, he might return to his bench. His first impulse was to ask that he might be allowed to depart; but on reflection he rightly considered that to do so would be an acknowledgment of guilt, and he thankfully availed himself of the permission to remain; but it was a hard trial to go into the shop the next morning.

He was pleased and surprised, however, to find that nearly everybody received him kindly. Wayland, of course, was an exception. He said little; but there was on his face a look of ill-concealed triumph.

"My notion is," said John Evans, "that that fellow Wayland knows more about this business than he cares to tell."

From that hour he watched him closely; and in a quiet sort of way he made some inquiries in other directions, the result of which will appear by-and-by.

One afternoon, as the men were leaving the shop, Evans saw Wayland drop something, and at the same time he saw one of the men pick it up. The man called out after Wayland, but he was out of hearing, and the article remained in his hand. Evans went up to him and asked what it was. It was a key somewhat roughly made, and evidently a new one.

He looked at it for a minute or two, and then he said, a grim smile lighting up his rugged countenance, " I shouldn't wonder if this turns out to be a little bit of daylight . Come back with me."

Followed by his companion, he went straight to Morton's bench; and there, applying the key to the lock, he found that the bolt flew back in an instant.

Another thing increased Wayland's enmity. In natural ability he was Morton's superior, and he prided himself greatly on his cleverness; but Morton had one gift which he had not, that of a steady, pains-taking perseverance. Whatever he did he tried to do well, and he could always be trusted; whilst on the contrary Wayland's work was often done in a very slipshod fashion. It followed from this, that though Wayland was now a journeyman and Morton as yet only an apprentice, the latter had often entrusted to him some of the best work, which Wayland thought should have been given to himself. Much embittered, he cast about in his mind what he should do to vex or injure Morton; but for a long time nothing occurred to him that he thought likely to succeed. At length he hit upon a device which he believed would effect his ruin.

Towards the close of Morton's apprenticeship, various articles of more or less value, some belonging to the workmen and others to the firm, were missed, and no one could imagine what had become of them. Somehow or other, Wayland contrived to throw suspicion on Morton; and one day when Morton was out at work in a gentleman's house in the neighbourhood, a box which he usually kept locked having been found open, some of the men—it was afterwards remembered at Wayland's instigation—searched it. There were the missing articles.

The foreman was informed; and it so happened that, just when he had been told about it and when he was anxiously considering what to do, the managing partner, Mr. Newsome, came into the shop; and he felt he had no alternative but to tell him what had happened.

Mr. Newsome, who was a hasty sort of man, though kind

and well-meaning, said there was nothing for it but to dismiss

Morton at once; but the foreman pleaded that, to say the

least, Morton should be heard. If he had really taken the

things—and he could not but confess that things looked

badly—he had never been so deceived in all his life.

It was evening before Morton returned, and when he did so he found the foreman and Mr. Newsome waiting for him. He was confounded when he heard what had happened; but, of course, he denied having ever touched the articles which had been found in his box. Moreover he was quite certain that when he left the shop in the morning his box was securely locked.

With some difficulty the foreman prevailed upon Mr. Newsome to let the thing stand over; and Morton was told that for the present at least, he might return to his bench. His first impulse was to ask that he might be allowed to depart; but on reflection he rightly considered that to do so would be an acknowledgment of guilt, and he thankfully availed himself of the permission to remain; but it was a hard trial to go into the shop the next morning.

He was pleased and surprised, however, to find that nearly everybody received him kindly. Wayland, of course, was an exception. He said little; but there was on his face a look of ill-concealed triumph.

"My notion is," said John Evans, "that that fellow Wayland knows more about this business than he cares to tell."

From that hour he watched him closely; and in a quiet sort of way he made some inquiries in other directions, the result of which will appear by-and-by.

One afternoon, as the men were leaving the shop, Evans saw Wayland drop something, and at the same time he saw one of the men pick it up. The man called out after Wayland, but he was out of hearing, and the article remained in his hand. Evans went up to him and asked what it was. It was a key somewhat roughly made, and evidently a new one.

He looked at it for a minute or two, and then he said, a grim smile lighting up his rugged countenance, " I shouldn't wonder if this turns out to be a little bit of daylight . Come back with me."

Followed by his companion, he went straight to Morton's bench; and there, applying the key to the lock, he found that the bolt flew back in an instant.

"The scoundrel!" he said. « Didn't I think so?"

The man readily promised strict secrecy for the present, and Evans laid his plans for the following day.

About the middle of the forenoon Evans stood "up in the shop and called out, loudly enough to be heard by everybody, " I say, will you all come here for a minute or two?"

It was no unusual thing for the men to be summoned in that way when anything of common interest needed consideration; and accordingly in a few minutes they were all assembled wondering what Evans wanted.

"Does anybody own this key?" he asked.

The key was passed round, but everybody, Wayland included, denied all knowledge of it

"Now come with me," said Evans.

"What foolery is this?" asked Wayland, looking ill at ease.

Evans made no reply, except by a look, which Wayland's conscience told him portended him trouble. Followed-by all the men, he went straight to Morton's box, and putting the key into the lock, he opened it .

Morton put his hand instinctively into his pocket, to see if his key were there.

"Aye, lad," said Evans, "it's all right . It isn't thy key. But Wayland knows whose it is."

"I—I—I know nothing about it," stammered Wayland.

"Thou liar !" said Evans, with rough stern directness, "it dropped out of thy pocket yesterday, and Morris picked it up; and I saw him pick it up."

"And if it is mine, what then?" Wayland asked, recovering his effrontery.

"' What then?' said Evans. "Thou knowest well enough 'what then.' Thou put those things into Morton's box. Harry Potter, tell us what thou saw."

"Well," said Harry, one of the lads, " I looked into the shop last Tuesday at dinner-time, and I saw Wayland there, and he had that box open. But he did not see me, for I went away directly."

Just then the foreman came in, and he was told what had happened .

"Pack up your tools this instant," he said to Wayland, very sternly. "We can't have a fellow here who would do a mean thing like that."

In a fewjninutes more Wayland disappeared; and in the course of a day or two it was reported that he had left the city; but nobody knew where he had gone.

"Three cheers for Morton!" said one o'f the men. And ringing cheers they were.

"I never believed it," said the foreman, as he grasped Morton's hand. "I could not make it out, but I was certain there was some trick about it."

Mr. Newsome sent for him, as soon as he heard what had taken place; and whilst congratulating him on his vindication, he had the manliness to express his regret that he had ever suspected him at all. To which Morton replied, very modestly, "Thank you, sir; but you know appearances were sadly against me."

Morton remained about a twelvemonth after the events we have narrated with Messrs. Potter and Newsome; and then, desirous of improvement, much to the regret alike of his employers and his fellow-workmen, he went to London; where, through'the strong recommendation of Mr. Newsome, he had obtained a situation in one of the best houses in the trade, that of Hallstead and Winter.

Twelve years more passed away, and Mr. Morton, having first risen to the position of general manager, was now one of the firm, and the acting partner; but his name did not appear, it having been thought well to retain the old title. As manager, it had been his duty to consider all applications for employment, and now that he was partner he still retained the thing in his own hands.

One day he was informed that a man was waiting in the outer office who wanted work, and he gave orders that he should be admitted.

It was Wayland. evidently in very low water and looking

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