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26.

November, 1806.

Another year! ---another deadly blow! Another mighty Empire overthrown! And we are left, or shall be left, alone; The last that dares to struggle with the Foe. 'Tis well! from this day forward we shall know That in ourselves our safety must be sought; That by our own right hands it must be wrought, That we must stand unpropp’d, or be laid low. O Dastard whom such foretaste doth not chear! We shall cxult, if They who rule the land Be Men who hold its many blessings dear, Wise, upright, valiant; not a venal Band, Who are to juilge of danger which they fear, And honour, which they do not understand.

N O T ES

to the

FIRST VOLUME.

NOTES:

NOTE 1. Page 1.–To the Daisy. This Poem, and two others to the same Flower, which the Reader will find in the second Volume, were written in the year 1802; which is mentioned, because in some of the ideas, though not in manner in which those ideas are connected, and likewise even in some of the expressions, they bear a striking resemblance to a Poem (lately published) of Mr. Montgomery, entitled, a Field Flower. This being said, Mr. Montgomery will not think any apology due to him; I cannot however help addressing biin in the words of the Father of English Poets.

• Though it happe me to rehersin • That ye han in your freshe songis saied, • Forberith me, and beth not ill apaied, •Sith that ye se I doe it in the honour • Of Love, and eke in service of the Flour.'

NOTE 11.

Page 35; line 14. —

"...... persevering to the last,

From well to better.” * For Knightes ever should be persevering . • To seek honour without feintise or slouth • Fru wele to better in all manner thing.'

CHAUCER ----The Floure and the Leafe.

NOTE III.

: Page 37. The Horn of Egremont Castle. This Story is a Cumberland tradition; I have

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