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him upon the professors of religion, for thirty or forty years, will not wonder, though he must grieve, at seeing those who once appeared true converts, nay, whom he himself looked up to, draw back, and disappoint the expectations of pious persons. Yet, having also observed that many have stood their ground, and exceeded his expectations, he will not suspect all who profess the gospel; but will endeavour to unite caution with candour in his conduct towards them ; and still go on " doing what u he can," though not able to do all that he would. Thus, my honoured brethren, let me animate you to proceed. Your design is noble; take your measures from the word of God; ask wisdom from him by ceaseless prayer;—for never did any undertaking more require heavenly wisdom. Be willing to pass " through evil report, and good report:" but refute the evil report, not so much by words, as by your steady uniform good conduct. Every thing, it appears to me, should be done to conciliate the Jews, except soothing them into a favourable opinion of their state and character in the sight of God; and nothing said or done, which so much as hints at any other thought of superiority to them, except that of being more highly favoured by God's special grace.—But I forbear: many of you have had far more opportunity of investigating the subject, than I have had; and my service at this time was to bear testimony to the excellence of the design; which having done, I conclude with earnestly commending it to the patronage and special blessing of the God of our salvation: to whom be glory and dominion for ever and ever: Amen!

AN ADDRESS

TO

THE REV. JOHN GODFREY WILHELM,

AND

THE REV. JONATHAN SOLOMON KLEIN,

ABOUT TO PROCEED AS MISSIONARIES TO THE WESTERN
COAST OF AFRICA

DELIVERED AT AH OPEN COMMITTEE MEETING OF THE
CHURCH MISSIONARY SOCIETY,

AUGUST 28, 1811.

The reader will perceive that the two persons to whom this Address was made had been under the Author's tuition at Aston Sandford.—J. S.

AN ADDRESS,

ETC.

Dearly beloved in the Lord, In complying with the request of the honoured Committee of this Society, by giving you a charge on the present most interesting occasion, when you are about to leave this country, and to go to a distant part of the globe, "to preach among the gen"tiles the unsearchable riches of Christ;" it is not likely that I should suggest to you many things, which you have not already, in a detached manner, heard from me, as well as from others. "To speak "the same things unto you, to me indeed is not "grievous, but for you it is safe." I may, however, hope " to stir up your pure minds by way of "remembrance." And if, by collecting together, and arranging in some order, the observations which you have often heard from me at different times, with a sincere desire of impressing them deeply on your hearts; I may be an instrument, in any degree, of promoting your future comfort and usefulness, I shall deem it an additional favour from our gracious God and Father.

From all which I have seen and known concerning you, I am fully convinced that it is the earnest and fervent desire of your hearts, to be employed by the Lord Jesus in enlarging his kingdom, by preaching his gospel to those who are now " sit"ting in darkness and in the shadow of death," and " perishing for lack of knowledge:" and that your minds are made up to submit to any privation or self-denial, and to face any danger, to which the pious, benevolent, and arduous attempt may call you.

Some things, therefore, which I am about to adduce may, perhaps, be deemed the less needful for you: yet they may not be improper, by way of remembrance: and, while I more directly address you, some hints may perhaps be dropped, which, in one way or other, may be useful to future Missionaries.

I shall arrange my thoughts, on this occasion, in the following method:

I. The special office and object of a Missionary: 'II. The peculiar difficulties, which Missionaries at present must encounter:

III. The endowments and dispositions which the service requires; especially in the region of your appointed labours:

IV. The peculiar encouragements by which you may be animated in your arduous undertaking:

V. Some counsels and exhortations arising from a review of the whole.

I. The special Office and Objects of a Missionary.—

It appears to me that a Missionary, properly so called, is a minister of Christ of a peculiar description. Others, who are not set apart to the sacred ministry, may be exceedingly useful in promoting the Missionary's grand object: they may be Schoolmasters or Catechiets; or they may,

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