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left as a specimen of the occasional imperfections of his style, while I have corrected all the considerable gram-. matical errors in the other parts of his works. In this respect our author is little indebted to his former editors, who have generally copied the errors of one edition into the following.

A low colloquiality was not unusual in some of those' discourses which he had not prepared for the press; particularly those in the Four Volumes: his sentences frequently beginning with “ why,”. “ now," and " why now.” These expressions were, doubtless, adopted for the sake of familiarity, but they tend rather to degrade style than to render it familiar: I have, therefore, removed them when the sense would allow it, and always the last of the three.

Another defect in our author's style has required vigilant correction. His metaphors were sometimes so puerile or so offensive, as to excite disgust rather than any honourable and virtuous feeling. These I have, therefore, omitted : but, as I wish the inquisitive reader to be fully satisfied how far, even for the best purposes, I have ventured to omit any thing which fell from our author's pen, I have subjoined in a note * a list of all

• vol. page line
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i. 293. 40............ 68, 26 vi. 28. 35............583. 26
ji. 17. 25...........246. 3 38. 34............588. 22
-- 92. 16............374. 19 42. 38............592. 6
- 121. 15............438. 3 54. 14............598. 13
- 162. 4............459. 22

- 30............ 24
235. 35............ 405. 54 67. 17 ............604. 46
244. 15............410. 16 68. 32.......605. 28, 29
245. 17............

70. 4............606. 15
- 246. 31............411. 34 72. 6............607. 24.
- 250. 7............413. 23 - - 15............ 33
- 279. 9............507.. 9 73. SO.........--608. 20
11............

78. 27............610. 58
478. 32............524. 43 80. 21............613.,
34............

- 30............

8
37............

- 84. 3............614. 56
- 490. 23............532. 6 - 100. 26............625. 31
iii. 28. 29............583. 22 - 140. 25............668. ult.

IIIIIIIII

EDITION

OF THIS EDITION. those places where omissions occur; such expressions as those above mentioned, and such as “ and,” or “and here,” &c. excepted. I would have here collected these expressions, but I was aware that the accumulation of these objectionable passages together would give an impression unfavourable to the author's general elegance and strength of mind : whereas, dispersed as they now are, and most of them connected with what were probably his youthful discourses, they appear but as the aberrations of a fancy not always under sufficient control. One which I have ventured to leave, vol. ii. p. 80, lines 6, 7, 8, may serve for a specimen.

The Quotations from Scripture seem to have been chiefly from memory: and the author herein shews a very familiar acquaintance with the sense of Scripture, and a sufficient verbal accuracy for the general purposes of the pulpit; but the editor of such discourses ought to verify and correct these quotations. This not having been done, I have accurately marked the words of Scripturé by Italics : which, in the former editions, were frequently left in Roman; and,

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page lipe
jii. 170. 1...........685. 31 iii. 243. 29............726. 14

231. 35............719. 28 - 244. 35............. 52

242. 23.............725. 32 249. 20...........729. 30

29............-- 37 427. 29............818. 19

ult............-- 48 450.' 15............736. 23 - 243. 2............

489. 27............835. 38

8............ 55 - 493. 25............837. 37 By far the greater part of these omissions are only of single words or sentences. The first column refers to the volume, page, and line of this edition ; and the second to the page and line of the folio edition : by a comparison of which two editions the reader will see what expressions have been omitted.

Besides these, there is an omission of a word, vol, iii. page 367, line 13 ; which word occurs page 439, line 9, of the original edition of the treatise on GLORIFYING God in his ATTRIBUTES : this treatise was printed after the folio. In vol. ij. 19. 22. I have substituted stopping for gagging ; p. 51. I. 17, glorious creatures for crystal pieces; and p. 67. I. 25, filled for stopped.

These are all the omissions and alterations allowed, so far as I can. recollect, except as above mentioned.

at other times, confounded with what were not the words of Scripture, but the mere deductions of the author from Scripture. Where the author's variation from the text appeared to be from mere inadvertence, I have corrected it; but, when there was any probability of design, I have left such words in Roman. The figures of reference were sometimes so incorrect that I was obliged to depend wholly on conjecture, where the quotation of the passage supplied no clue. · Nothing strikes a reader of these works, who wishes to enter into an accurate comprehension of the divisions and plans of the author, so much as the confusion arising from the frequent repetition of the same kind of notation, and the want of a distinct and clear method of notation. I have, therefore, first studied each treatise separately, for the express purpose of embracing the whole plan of the author, without regard to the artificial methods of notation adopted by him ; which were, in truth, most inartificial. The author had, in general, a remarkably well-arranged plan in his mind; and this I have endeavoured to render obvious to the reader by adopting a notation varied according to the subject.

The principal divisions are printed in full capitals, and are marked with the full Roman numerals: thus I, II, &c.

The secondary heads are printed in small Roman capitals, with small Roman numerals: thus i, ii, &c.

The third sub-divisions are printed in Italics, with the common Arabic numerals : thus. 1, 2, &c.

The remainder have no distinction in the type, except occasionally that the chief words begin with a capital letter : but the notation is as follows: Subdivisions of the Fourth Order thus : (1), (2), &c. Fifth

[1], [2], &c. Sixth

- Ist., 2dly., &c. Seventh - (1st), (2dly), &c. Eighth

[1st],[2dly],&c. Ninthly

(a), (b), &c. VOL. 1.

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Such divisions as could not be brought under any regular
head are printed thus: First, &c. or First, &c. or
First, &c.
, . These divisions may appear to be carried too far; but
the author is to answer on that subject, not the editor :
it may cost the reader some little trouble, at first, to
recollect these artificial notations of the heads as they
stand in subordination to one another ; but his labour
will be abundantly repaid by the perfect comprehension
which he will thereby acquire of the author's plan, and
the assistance which his memory will derive from them.

This mode of enumeration applies to every piece of the author except that on the VANITY OF THE WORLD; that treatise having been printed before the editor was aware of the necessity of adopting a more enlarged plan of division, than that which prevails therein.

In order to a perfect arrangement and notation I was sometimes obliged to form a head from what afterwards occurred, when the author had neglected to mark the division : as in vol. i. p. 553, I have introduced the head 1. The first kind of Theft, &c. from the author's close of it in p. 559, there being no such head marked in the original edition, which threw the arrangement into confusion. · Two copious Indexes are subjoined to the whole collection: one, of such passages of Scripture as are illustrated by the Author; and the other, of all the principal matters on which he discourses. The Editor intended to prefix full and accurate Tables of Contents to each volume; but he found, on trial, that the Author's'. numerous divisions and sub-divisions of his subjects would render it impracticable to give an analysis of each treatise • in such tables.

· J.P.

THE

LIFE

OF

BISHOP HOPKINS.

The Rev. John Prince, Vicar of Berry-Pomeroy, in the County of Devon, who was personally acquainted with Bishop Hopkins, has left the following account of him in his “ Worthies of Devon."

“ Ezekiel, Lord-Bishop of Derry, in the kingdom of Ireland, was born at Sandford, a Chapel of Ease belonging to the parish of Crediton, in this county, about the year of our Lord 1633. His father was a Reverend Divine; and, for many years, the laborious Minister of that parish. Having had the advantages of a good school and pregnant parts, he was soon fit for the Uni. versity; and accordingly sent to Oxford, where he became Chorister of Magdalen College, A. 1649, aged 16 years, or thereabouts *

“After this, having taken his Bachelor of Arts' degree, which he did Oct. 17, 1653 †, he was admitted Usher to the School adjoining to his College : and, when

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