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filled with sin, and their hearts are steeped in iniquity. Pride, and impiety, and wilfulness, and covetousness, and hideous sins have filled up the measure of their crimes. The longsuffering of God, the forbearance of the Holy One, is exhausted. Woe unto thee, Sodom, for had but ten righteous men been found in thee, thou hadst been saved. Woe unto thee, Gomorrah, for hadst thou repented of thy transgressions, evil had not overtaken thee; but now “ there is wrath gone out from the Lord.” Fire is falling from heaven ; the flaming deluge is consuming the cities of the plain, and they and the people that inhabit them are overwhelmed with the fiery destruction. “ It is a fearful thing to fall into the hands of the living God,” Heb. x. 31.

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A great cry is gone up from the land of Egypt; consternation and dread have afflicted the inhabitants, for sorrow and death lie heavy on their hearts. " There is wrath gone out from the Lord.” The river has been turned into blood; the loathsome frog has been multiplied, coming up even into the beds and the kneading troughs of the people; lice, and the fly, and the locust have plagued them, and the murrain, and the boils, and the hail, and the darkness have tormented them; but the heart of haughty Pharaoh is yet hardened, and God has sent another plague on his unrepentant head. It is midnight, and the Lord, in his righteous displeasure, is smiting all the first-born of the land, from the first. born of king Pharaoh on the throne, to the first-born of the captive in the dungeon. Pharaoh has risen in haste from his bed, he and his servants and the Egyptians, for death is in every house. How loud the wailings for the dead! The judgments of the Lord are abroad, and the Egyptians are urging the Israelites to leave the land of their captivity. Pharaoh, thy sins are great, 6 therefore is wrath upon thee from before the Lord,” 2 Chron. xix. 2.

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The noise of many waters is heard, and the loud shriek of an expiring multitude is rending the air, for Pharaoh, in the madness of his rage, has pursued hard after the children of Israel, and “there is wrath gone out from the Lord.” The sea has been driven back by the hand of the Eternal; the Israelites have passed through it on dry land, and the Egyptians have been led on to their ruin. The pillar that went before the camp of Israel is removed behind them; to them it is a pillar of light, but to their enemies a cloud and darkness. Confusion and dismay have seized the heart of Pharaoh and the hearts of his mighty men, for the Lord of hosts is fighting against them.

At the commandment of Jehovah the sea rolls back to its place. Even now the horse and his rider are overthrown; Pharaoh is sinking as lead in the waters, and the whole of the Egyptian host is swallowed up by the sea. Very terrible is thy indignation, O Lord. " Thou sentest forth thy wrath, which consumed them as stubble,” Exod. xv. 7.

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The tents of the children of Israel are pitched in the wil. derness, and confusion is spreading among the tribes of Jacob, for Korah the son of Izhar is rebelling against the commandment of the Lord, and Dathan and Abiram have risen in rebellion against the Almighty. Two hundred and fifty princes of the people, famous in the congregation, and men of renown, have already joined the standard of revolt. “Ye take too much upon you, seeing all the congregation are holy," exclaims Korah to Moses and Aaron. Ye have brought us out to kill us in the wilderness, and to make yourselves princes over us, cry out Dathan and Abiram. But, lo! the anger of the Holy One is upon them, and “ there is wrath gone out from the Lord.” A new thing has astonished the tents of Jacob and afflicted the hosts of Israel, for the earth has opened her mouth, the yawning ground has swallowed up Korah and his company, and fire from the Lord has consumed the rebellious princes of the congregation. The Lord is mighty in strength : who hath hardened himself against him, and hath prospered ?” Job ix. 3.

Surely the people of Israel are a stiff-necked people; they will not learn from the judgments of the Holy One, neither will they consider his ways. Though the cloven ground swallowed up Korah, and fire from the Lord destroyed the princes of Israel, again is there murmuring in the camp against Moses and Aaron, saying, “ Ye have killed the people of the Lord.” What wonder that the anger of the Lord is again kindled! What wonder that Moses is afraid for the people! 66 And Moses said unto Aaron, Take a censer, and put fire therein from off the altar, and put on incense, and go quickly unto the congregation, and make an atonement for them: for there is wrath gone out from the Lord ; the plague is begun. And Aaron took as Moses commanded, and ran into the midst of the congregation; and, behold, the plague was begun among the people: and he put on incense, and made an atonement for the people. And he stood between the dead and the living; and the plague was stayed,” Num. xvi. 46–48. “ Righteous art thou, O Lord, and upright are thy judgments," Psa. cxix. 137.

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Again are the children of Israel rebelling against God, and murmuring against the counsels of the Most High. In vain has he brought them out with a high hand from their captivity, and overthrown their enemies; in vain has he rained down bread from heaven to satisfy their hunger, and brought water from the flinty rock to assuage their thirst, for they still speak against him. The tribes of Reuben and Simeon despise his gifts, and those of Judah and Issachar and the rest undervalue his inercies; but see! “ There is wrath gone out from the Lord.” Fiery serpents are coiling around them, and stinging them into madness with their envenomed fangs. Uproar, and confusion, and fear, and agony, and death prevail. What if the Lord were implacable! If the God of Israel were deaf to their cry ! Tremble at the judgments of the Eternal. 66 God distributeth sorrows in his anger. How often is the candle of the wicked put out? And how oft cometh their destruction upon them?” Job xxi. 17.

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When God commands, woe to him who disobeys; for though hand join in hand he shall not go unpunished, even if he be the man after God's own heart. 66 Go, number Israel from Beersheba even unto Dan, and bring the number of them to me,” said David to Joab, the captain of his host; but in this he sinned against the Lord. Whether it was that in his heart he was led to trust in man rather than in God, who had so often delivered him, or whether he was led by pride to glory in the number of those over whom he reigned, in the thing that he did he greatly displeased God, who had taken him from the sheepfold, and made him a king. David is in a great strait, for “ there is wrath gone out from the Lord.” He has but a choice of evils,-three years of famine, three months of discomfiture before his enemies, or three days of pestilence? He has chosen to fall into the hands of rather than the hand of man, and the pestilence is raging abroad. David has done right to clothe himself in sackcloth, and make supplication to the Lord, for seventy thousand souls have fallen by the plague. Surely all that sin against God should humble themselves before him, and pray that in wrath he would “ remember mercy,” Hab. iii. 2.

These are some of the judgments of God recorded in his word ; judgments most righteously executed when “ there is wrath gone out from the Lord.” If God spared not these that have been thus set before thee, take heed, reader, to thy ways, and sin not against him, lest he spare not thee. Neglect not his salvation; despise not the means of grace, nor the hope of glory.

* To the Lord our God belong mercies and forgivenesses, though we have rebelled against him,” Dan. ix. 9. But woe to those who refuse the invitations of that Saviour, who died, the Just for the unjust, to bring us to God.

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TO MY NEIGHBOUR. « Jesus said, He that cometh to me shall never hunger; and he that believeth on me shall never thirst," John vi. 35. WHOEVER may read this letter is a neighbour of mine, and as such I am bound to love him as myself. On this account I write.

MY NEIGHBOUR,—We are inhabitants of this world, which we are soon to leave, for our years here quickly pass away. Our days are numbered ; they hasten away; and our life, like a stream, flows swiftly along its course. Soon it may be said of me and of yourself that the grave has received us within its open jaws. In a few years we shall be no more seen, nor will our voices be heard again on earth. But the world will go on as before; cities will be inhabited, and fields cultivated ; men will have their business, their engagements, their pleasures and excitements still; but we shall no longer be able to take part in their pursuits ; we shall no longer be concerned with them. Where then shall we be ? O my neighbour, this is a short but a solemn question, Where will our souls be when a few years have passed away?

In eternity, you answer; beyond the limits of time and space, in the boundless extent which remains when these are at an end. But what sort of an eternity will ours be? For the word of God tells us of eternal bliss and misery, life and death. Which of these two states will be ours? As for me, my neighbour, I can sincerely say that I believe state will be that of eternal light and life; and because I possess this happiness, I desire to make it known to you, that if you have it not you may see where it is to be sought and found; or should you enjoy it, you will unite with me in giving thanks to the gracious God and Father, from whose mercy we have received it.

my own

First, let me tell you that I was long very indifferent as to these things. I thought little of my own soul, or of my future condition, and I lived only so as to provide for my immediate wants and desires. This state of unconcern gave place to some degree of alarm. The death of persons near my own age, of neighbours and relations, called me to think upon my latter end, and more than once brought before me, as if with a loud and distinct voice, these words of awful import-sin and judgment. Secretly, I began to look into my conduct. I spoke of this to no one, but I often thought upon it whilst walking or at home, whilst employed in the daytime or awake during the night; and I saw that if I were tried by the law of God, which I well knew, I should in no way

be able to stand before him. Not that I was a man of disorderly or evil life. No, my neighbour, I can tell

you that in my conduct as to my fellow creatures I may truly say I was a man of integrity, and my life was truly sincere and correct. But though honest in the sight of men, I was a sinner before God. He looks not at the outward appearance, nor at fair speaking, but at the heart; and my heart was far, very far from clean. When I examined it, I found many evil desires, many earthly and sinful passions, and, worst of all, many idols ; for I felt that I loved many things, and chiefly my own self, rather than the Lord Jehovah. This discovery humbled me, and convinced me that I was in a state of condemnation under the law of God. My mouth was stopped, and I could find no excuse for myself, since this law required that I should love God with all my heart, and soul, and strength, and mind; but I had loved the creature more than the Creator.

Thus I was put to silence, being fully aware that, if I appeared before God relying on my own righteousness, I must be condemned and lost. Such is also your state, my neigh

for however honest and upright you may be, I cannot think that you either now love, or have loved, God with all your heart and strength. And what if you have not been altogether honest? If you are, or have been, given to drinking, uncleanness, or covetousness, greedy and selfish, or jealous, malicious, and spiteful, intemperate or lazy, a slanderer or hater of religion, what will your state then be if you must appear in such a character before the judgment seat of God? Will your state be one of joy or of nisery?

I understood, and I deeply felt, my own condition. I saw clearly that I was a sinner, and that the wages of sin is death,

bour ;

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