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moon

Rousseau's opinions, their origin 522 Volney's travels, preface, transla-
Regent diamond, account of 726 tion of

332
Savages fond of liquor
498 Vosges mountaineers

530
Sierra Leone colony, an account of 538 War of St. Domingo

604
Salt, on the manufacture of Che. Wales, pictures in

443
shire
504 Welsh fairies described

450
Show and use, an apologue 305 Washington, on Marshall's life of 243
Sicard's mode of teaching the deaf Weather, signs of

424
and dumb
470 Wealth, reflections on

95, 185
Sieges, errors in the account of 152 Wife, character of a good one 380
Similies from Homer, Virgil, and Willard, account of president 553
Milton
312 Worldling's prayer

175
Similitude of persons, remarks on 260 Winter's day

416
case of personal 285 Women, state of among the Arabs 716
Slave trade, speech on the
45 Yeast, a substitute for

668
Sir Isaac Newton's religion 665 Young, Dr. as a letter writer 664
Schinderhannes, the robber 550 Zealand flax

669
Sedley, sir Charles
496 Zeendorf education, account of it

514
Smith's, sir Sidney, imprisonment
and escape from Paris

28
Spain and Portugal, on the poetry of 581

POETRY.
Spirituous liquors

85
Splines
657 Address to a wood lark

20
Statistical table of the United States 179 Adieu, the

536
Stork, manners of the
61 Address to a friend

677
Scottish deserts
701 Azora, night song of

376
Stonehenge
133 Banks of Cree

20
Stones from the clouds 223, 318, 385 Beth Gelert

267
257 Caroline

380
Story, a forced one
552 Clara, to

679
Sweden, concerning, by Acerbi
33 Castle of mystery

193
Swindler, a female, at Vienna 489 Description of youth

117
Syria, its soil and climate
479 Despondency

118
Stereotype printing
654 Elegiac stanzas

603
Shenstone's Leasowes

712 Elegy
Snakes, organization of
727 Evening, a sketch

603
Tager, Talpier, an account of him 552 Exile from France

428
Talents, whether hereditary

203
Hope

602
Teeth, various customs concerning 37 Invitation, the

265
Tea, growth and manufacture of 642 Jessy, the self-deluded

18
Telescopes, remarks on
449 Invitation, the

537
Tempe and Olympus, their modern Monody

319
471 Old Thomas

119
Theological terms explained 664 Ode to the river Derwent

269
Time, computation of
499 Passaick, lines on

190
Thermolamps
704 Painting, stanzas to

537
Turkish empire, its principal cha Rabbit, the discontented

192
racters described

617

Ruins
Vaccination, state and advantages Romeo, to

679
of
359 Satirists, an idea for

120
Vampire described

159 Sleepless nights, to a lady com-
Varieties

688
plaining of

269
Vine, culture of the, in France 681 Solitary tutor, the

533
Venice, account of its old govern. Thought, a

602
ment

698 Verses by Susannah Wright 191
Virtue, whether hereditary 203 Verses from the French

428
its nature exhibited
415 Walk, a rural

377
Voice, on the seat of it

522
Youth

18
Voiture

671

427

state

117

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COMMUNICATIONS. page

page

Memoirs of Carwin the Biloquist 1 Description of Dresden and its en-

Agricultural Essays, No. III

8 virons

Portraits

9 | Extracts from a Speech on the Slave

Critical Notices, No. VI
ibid. Trade

45

Remarks on the Judiciary Systems On the propensity of several nations

of the United States

13

to greasy meats and drinks 47

REVIEW.

Character of Chaucer, by Godwin 48

Poems, by Peter Bayley, Jun. Esq. 15 The female character displayed dur-

POETRY....ORIGINAL. ing the French Revolution 53

Youth, No. II
18 Morse Fishing described

58

The Self-deluded Jessy
ibid. || Anecdote of Dr. Johnson

60

SELECTED.
Speed of the Ostrich

ibid.

Banks of Cree
20 Character of the Stork

61

Address to a Wood-Lark ibid. Sociability of the Lapwing ibid.
SELECTIONS.

The dignity of Geese vindicated ibid.

Anecdotes of Bacon the Sculptor ibid. Account of the Burying-Beetle 63

History of the London Brewery 21 Account of Roslin Castle

64

Of St. Paul's Profession, or Trade 22 On the propensity of several nations

Perkins' Points

to hard drinking

66

Account of the Indian Banyan Tree 26 || The use and abuse of notes of ac-

Explanation of Hindoo Terms 27 comodation

70

Account of Sir Sidney Smith's im Proofs that the people of the southern

prisonment and escape from Paris 28 climes have a much stronger pro-
Particulars respecting Sweden, by pensity to heating and intoxicating
Ascerbi

33 liquors and drugs than those of

On some ways of ornamenting the the northern nations

73

teeth, in use among various na The Oran Otan

79

tions
37 Notes from the Editor

80

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IN answer to the reveries and spe- and my virtue be subjected to severo culations which I sent to him re- trials. At present it was not in his specting this subject, Ludloe inform- power to be more explicit; but if ed me, that they had led his mind my reflections suggested no better into a new sphere of meditation. He plan, he advised me to settle my afhad long and deeply considered in fairs in Spain, and return to him imwhat way he might essentially pro- mediately. My knowledge of this mote my happiness. He had enter- country would be of the highest use, tained a faint hope that I would one on the supposition of my ultimately day be qualified for a station like arriving at the honours to which he that to which he himself had been had alluded; and some of these preadvanced. This post required an paratory measures could be taken elevation and stability of views which only with his assistance, and in his human beings seldom reach, and company. which could be attained by me only This intimation was eagerly obeyby a long series of heroic labours. ed, and, in a short time, I arrived Hitherto every new stage in my in- at Dublin. Meanwhile my mind had tellectual progress had added vigour copious occupation in commenting to his hopes, and he cherished a on my friend's letter. This scheme, stronger belief than formerly that whatever it was, seemed to be sugmy career would terminate auspi- gested by my mention of a plan of ciously. This, however, was neces colonization, and my preference of sarily distant. Many preliminaries that mode of producing extensive must first be settled; many arduous and permanent effects on the condiaccomplishments be first obtained; tion of mankind. It was easy there

fore to conjecture that this mode had entered once more on my former been pursued under some mysteri- mode of life, but our intercourse beous modifications and conditions. came more frequent. We constantly

It had always excited my wonder breakfasted together, and our conthat so obvious an expedient had versation was usually prolonged been overlooked. The globe which through half the morning. we inhabit was very imperfectly For a time our topics were geneknown. The regions and nations ral. I thought proper to leave to unexplored, it was reasonable to be- him the introduction of more intelieve, surpassed in extent, and per- resting themes: this, however, he haps in populousness, those with betrayed no inclination to do. His which we were familiar. The or reserve excited some surprise, and der of Jesuits had furnished an ex I began to suspect that whatever deample of all the errors and excel- sign he had formed with regard to lencies of such a scheme. Their me, had been laid aside. To ascerplan was founded on erroneous no tain this question, I ventured, at tions of religion and policy, and they length, to recall his attention to the had absurdly chosen a scene* within subject of his last letter, and to enreach of the injustice and ambition quire whether subsequent reflection of an European tyrant.

had made any change in his views. It was wise and easy to profit by He said that his views were too their example. Resting on the two momentous to be hastily taken up, props of fidelity and zeal, an associ. or hastily dismissed; the station, my ation might exist for ages in the attainment of which depended wholly heart of Europe, whose influence on myself, was high above vulgar might be felt, and might be bound- heads, and was to be gained by years less, in some region of the southern of solicitude and labour. This, at hemisphere; and by whom a moral least, was true with regard to minds and political structure might be rais- ordinarily constituted; I, perhaps, ed, the growth of pure wisdom, and deserved to be regarded as an extotally unlike those fragments of ception, and might be able to acRoman and Gothic barbarism, which complish in a few months that for cover the face of what are called which others were obliged to toil the civilized nations. The belief during half their lives. now rose in my mind that some such Man, continued he, is the slave of scheme had actually been prosecut- habit. Convince him to-day that his ed, and that Ludloe was a coadjutor. duty leads straight forward: he On this supposition, the caution with shall advance, but at every step his which he approached to his point, belief shall fade; habit will resume the arduous probation which a can its empire, and to-morrow he shall didate for a part on this stage must turn back, or betake himself to obundergo, and the rigours of that test lique paths. by which his fortitude and virtue We know not our strength till it must be tried, were easily explained. be tried. Virtue, till confirmed by I was too deeply imbued with vene- habit, is a dream. You are a man ration for the effects of such schemes, imbued by errors, and vincible by and too sanguine in my confidence slight temptations. Deep enquiries in the rectitude of Ludloe, to refuse must bestow light on your opinions, my concurrence in any scheme by and the habit of encountering and which my qualifications might at vanquishing temptation must inspire length be raised to a due point. you with fortitude. Till this be done,

Our interview was frank and af- you are unqualified for that post, in fectionate. I found him situated just which you will be invested with die as formerly. His aspect, manners, vine attributes, and prescribe the and deportment were the same. I condition of a large portion of man

kind. * Paraguay.

Confide not in the firmness of

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