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JOURNAL

OF THE

CONVENTION. 1828.

Norwalk, Wednesday June 4th, 1828. Tais being the day appointed by the Constitution of the Protestant Episcopal Church in the State of Connecticut, for the meeting of the Annual Convention of said Church, the Rt. Rev. T. C. Brownell, D. D. L. L. D. and several Clergymen and Lay-Delegates attended in St. Paul's Church, at 10 o'clock, A, M.

Morning prayer was read by the Rev. Harry Croswell, Rector of Trinity Church, New-Haven. The Sermon was delivered by the Bishop. The Bishop admitted the Rev. William A. Curtis, to the boly order of Priests. The Rev. H. Croswell, and the Rev. R. Sherwood, assisted the Bishop in the administration of the holy communion.

The Chair was taken by the Bishop. A list of the Clergy entitled to seats in the Convention, was called over by the Secretary, and the following answered to their names and took their seats :: The Right Rev. T. C. BROWNELL, (Rev. STEPHEN JEWETT, D. D. L. L. D. Bishop.

HENRY R. JUDAH, Rev. GEORGE B. ANDREWB,

“ BETHEL JUDD, ASHBEL BALDWIN,

JAMES KEELER, 16 DAVID BALDWIN,

or HENRY M. MASON, " STEPHEN BEACH,

56 BIRDSEY G. NOBLE, DANIEL BURHANS,

WM. T. POTTER, * PETER G. CLARK,

" RODNEY ROSSITER, • HARRY CROSWELL,

66 EDWARD RUTLEDGE, 66 J. W. CLOUD,

« GEORGE C. SHEPARD, of WM. A. CURTIS,

6 REUBEN SHERWOOD, " JOHN M. GARFIELD,

WM. SHELTON, 1 FRANCIS L. HAWKS,

or DANIEL SOMERS, * ORIGEN P. HOLCOMB,

66 JOAN S. STONE, 6 LEMUEL B. HULL,

AMBROSE S. TODD, « ENOCR HUNTINGTON,

“ NATHANIEL S. WHEATON. " HACTOR HUMPHREYS,

66

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The following Clergymen entitled to seats in this Convention, of
residing in this Diocese, were not present :
Rev. D. BELDEN,

E. B. KELLOGG,
B. BENHAM,

4 T. MARSA,
" N F. BRUCE,

S. MILES, " S. BLAKESLEY,

" S. B. PADDOCK, " N. B. Burgess,

16 J. PERRY, " J. T. CLARK,

" N. PINNEY, on A. CORNWALL,

• C. PRINDLE, " A. GEAR,

" H. POTTER, S. GRISWOLD

" A. STEELE, F. HOLCOMB,

< M. Wilcox,
R. Ives,

R. WARNER,
W. JARVIS,

G. S. WHITE.
I. JONES,
The Rev. Ashbel Baldwin, and the Rev. B. G. Noble, were ap-
pointed a committee to receive and examine the testimonials of the
Lay-Delegates.

On motion by the Rev. A. Baldwin, the Convention adjourned till half past 3 o'clock, P. M.

St. Paul's Church, half past 3 o'clock, P. M.
The Convention assembled pursuant to adjournment.
The roll of the Clergy was called.

The Rev. B. G. Noble, from the committee to whom was referred the certificates of the Lay-Delegates, made the following report :

The committee appointed to receive and examine the certificates of the Lay-Delegates, report that the following persons have been duly elected to represent their respective Parishes in this Convention : Col. George A. Foot, Guilford. David G. Tomlinson,

} Milford.
Dr. Darıd W. Olmstead, Wilton. G. R. Tomlinson,
Nathan Kingsley, New Preston. Stephen Olmstead, Ridgefield.
John G. Noble,

Hull Sherwood, Fairfield.

New Milford. Truman Richmond,

Ashbel London, Humphrey Nichols,

Selah Kilbourn, 3

Salisbury.
Waterbury
Lyman Bradley,

Elijah Warner, Plymouth.
Felix Starkey, Esq. Esset.

Reuben Hunt, Canaan. ,

Ira Burmam, } Danbury

.

Joel Stone,
Eli Walker Lewis,
Stratford.
Henry Belden, Esq.

Norwalk.
Edwards Johnson,

Dr. Richard Bryan,
Daniel Putnam, E44. Brooklyn. Wm. R. Hitchcock, Esq. Cheshire.
Wm. Post,

Jonathan Meeker,} Reading.
Simeon H. Minor, F.sq.} Stamford.

Henry Curtis, Derby. John W. Leeds,

Wm. H. Imlay, Esq. Hartford. Stephen Betts, Esq. New Canaan. Hon. John S. Peters, Hebron.

These Delegates were present, with the exception of those whose names are printed in italics, and the roll being called, answered to their names, and took their seats in Convention.

A quorum of both orders being present, the Convention proceeded

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John Johnson, } Newtown.

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Elijah Burrit,} Bridgeport.

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to elect a Secretary, and the Rev. Birdsey G. Noble was unanimously chosen.

On motion of the Rev. R. Sherwood-Resolved, That clergymen of the Protestant Episcopal Church, belonging to other dioceses, and candidates for holy orders, who may be in this town during the session of this Convention, be admitted to the sittings of the same.

Agreeably to this resolution, the Rev. Ralph Williston, from the diocese of Pennsylvania, and Mr. Allen C. Morgan, a candidate for holy orders, took seats in Convention.

The Right Rev. T.C. BROWNELL, Bishop of the Diocese, agreeable to the 45th Canon of the General Convention, delivered the following

ADDRESS. My Brethren of the Clergy and of the Laity :Another of those interesting periods has returned, when we are accustomed to assemble together, for mutual information concerning the several portions of our Zion, and to deliberate on such measures as, with the blessing of God, may be conducive to her peace and prosperity. May we all be deeply impressed with gratitude to the Divine Being, for the abundant mercies he has bestowed on us during the past year. May we feel a deep sense of our entire dependance on Him; and may we humbly and fervently seek his blessing on our present deliberations.

The 45th Canon of the General Convention, requires that, on this occasion, I should lay before you a view of the state of the Diocese, and an account of the Episcopal acts I have performed since our last annual meeting.

My visitations through the Diocese, in the course of the past year, have been extensive, and, in general, highly satisfactory. They have enabled me to bear testimony to the fidelity of my brethren of the Clergy, and to the cordiality with which their efforts have been seconded by the Laity, wherever they have been exerted with zeal and constancy. Our Church is, probably, less subject to sudden Auctuations than other religious communions. We look for no high excitements. We expect no sudden and rapid growth, which is often as sudden in decay. To be steadily progressive, in extent, in zeal, and in piety, is what we most desire. Such, I believe, is the present state of the Church in this Diocese. If its progress does not wholly keep pace with our wishes, it is perhaps as auspicious as we can reasonably expect.

The gradual increase of the Clergy may afford no incorrect index of the general state of the Church. Little more than eight years ago, when I was first called, in the course of divine Providence, to preside over the interests of the diocese, the number of its clergy was but forty-two ;* the number at the present time, is fifty. nine, and there are 3 or 4 vacant cures, each of which would afford

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adequate support to a clergyman. The worldly inducements to enter on the ministerial office, have never been a matter of temptation in this country. Perhaps they have not been more humble, in any part of it, than in Connecticut. But it is believed that the clergy are as liberally provided for, at the present time, as at any former period, and without any oppressive burthen on the parishes.

If the tone of religious feeling has, within the last few years, been somewhat raised throughout our Church, there is good reason to believe that this diocese has participated in the animating spirit. An increasing zeal is evinced in supporting stated ministrations in the several parishes, in providing for the religious instruction of the rising generation, in the dissemination of religious knowledge, and in the missionary cause. We have abundant reason to bless God for these encouraging indications of increasing zeal and piety, and to pray that they may continue and abound more and more.

The exertions that have been made for the promotion of education, are not less encouraging than the indications of increasing zeal in the cause of religion. It is but few years, since the youth of our communion were educated almost exclusively by persons of other religious persuasions. This is not mentioned as ground of complaint, but as resulting from the circumstances under which our Church has grown up, in a community dissenting from her doctrines and worship. But such a state of things must have greatly impeded her growth, and we have reason to congratulate ourselves that a more propitious era has commenced. We have now, under the auspices of Episcopalians, Seminaries for the education of females, of as high grade as any in our country. We have, besides the well endowed Institution at Cheshire, respectable Academies at Norwalk, at Granby, and at Sha

And we have a College at Hartford, which at present numbers nearly 90 students, and gives a fair promise of extensive and lasting usefulness.

It is thus that our Church is beginning to take a stand among the religious denominations, by which she is surrounded, and to participate in those equal privileges which are accorded and secured by the constitution of our country. We neither enjoy nor desire exclusive privileges, nor would we give to our Institutions an exclusive or party character. We would place them on the same footing with those of other religious persuasions ; and conducting them with a liberality and charity surpassed by none other in our country, we may reasonably expect that these institutions will not be regarded as objects of jealousy, and that we shall ourselves escape the uncharitable imputation of sectarianism.

The situation of Cheshire Academy will doubtless occupy the attention of the present Convention. The Trustees of the Iostitution, pursuant to a vote of this body, at the last annual meeting, proceeded to the election of a Principal, who was recommended as well qualified for the station ; but owing to the precarious state of his health, be

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declined the appointment. The Board of Trustees have taken no subsequent measures on the subject; but the Prudential Committee of the Board, deeming it highly expedient that the Academy should be opened, appointed the Rev. Henry M. Mason, to the provisional charge of the Institution. This gentleman is well qualified by bis learning, to fill the station of Principal, with reputation and usefulness ; but the small number of students who have been attracted to the Academy, indicates the necessity of giving to the Institution a new organization, to accommodate it to the improvements which have recently been made in the methods of Academical instruction.

The education of our youth is a subject of deep interest, under whatever aspect it may be viewed. It is peculiarly so in reference to our Sunday Schools. In this Diocese, the general diffusion of ele. mentary education enables us to devote these schools exclusively to their appropriate object, religious instruction. Perhaps no more efficient method of effecting this object could be devised._It extends its influence to the instructors, as well as to the pupils. The former are generally taken from the young people of the parish, at the interesting period of life when they begin to feel the responsibility of their station, as members of the community, and as probationers for another state of existence. At such a period, they cannot inculcate upon the children committed to their care, the great truths and duties of religion, without feeling the peculiar force with which they rest upon themselves. I believe Sunday Schools are now established in almost every parish of the diocese. I have watched their progress, and marked their influence, with the deepest interest. I cannot but see, in these schools, the members and supporters of the Church, as it is to exist, only a few years hence ; and I cannot but feel how deeply its welfare will be indentified with their piety, their zeal, and their soundness in the faith. I recommend to the Convention, the passing of a resolution or canon, directing returns of the Sunday Schools to be annexed to the annual parocbial reports, indicating the number of the scholars and of the teachers, and when the schools are, or are nót, connected with the General Sunday School Union of our Church; or that some other course be adopted, calculated to strengthen that Union, and to diffuse its benefits more extensively to the schools in this diocese.

The religious and charitable Institutions of the Church in this Diocese, as well as those established under the sanction of the General Convention, have been pressed upon the consideration of this body, in most of my previous addresses. I will only add, at the present time, that, in my estimation, these institutions have lost none of their interest, and that I regard, with high satisfaction, the increasing favor with which they are viewed, and the increasing zeal with which they are fostered by the members of our Church.

In the course of my visitations, during the past year, I have officiated in several parishes, where no daties peculiarly pertaining to the

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