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LONDON : GEORGE BELL AND SONS, YORK STREET,

COVENT GARDEN.

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PR 3301 .H8 1877

v.5

LONDON:

PRINTED BY WILLIAM CLOWES AND SONS,

STAMFORD STREET AND CHARING CROSS.

PAGR

THE FREEHOLDER.

49. Thanksgiving-day for suppressing the late Rebellion

50. The Folly and Mischief of Mobs and Riots

51. Cautions to be observed in the reading of ancient

Greek and Roman Historians

52. Of State Jealousy

53. Britons, Free-thinkers in Politics

54. Preference of the Whig Scheme to that of the Tories

55. Conclusion

ON THE CHRISTIAN RELIGION.

SECTION 1.

1. General division of the following discourse, with regard

to Pagan and Jewish authors, who mention particulars relat-

ing to our Saviour.

2. Not probable that any such should be mentioned by

Pagan writers who lived at the same time, from the nature

of such transactions.

3. Especially when related by the Jews.

4. And heard at a distance by those who pretended to as

great miracles as their own.

5. Besides that no Pagan writers of that age lived in Judea

or its confines.

6. And because many books of that age are lost.

7. An instance of one record proved to be authentic.

8. A second record of probable, though not undoubted, au-

thority.

SECTION II.

1. What facts in the history of our Saviour might be taken

notice of by Pagan authors.

2. What particular facts are taken notice of, and by what

Pagan authors.

3. How Celsus represented our Saviour's miracles.

4. The same representation made of them by other unbe-

lievers, and proved unreasonable.

5. What facts in our Saviour's history not to be expected

from Pagan writers.

SECTION III.

1. Introduction to a second list of Pagan authors who give

testimony of our Saviour.

2. A passage concerning our Saviour from a learned Athe-

nian.

3. His conversion from Paganism to Christianity makes his

evidence stronger than if he had continued a Pagan.

4. Of another Athenian philosopher converted to Christ-

ianity.

5. Why their conversion, instead of weakening, strengthens

their evidence in defence of Christianity.

6. Their belief in our Saviour's history founded at first upon

the principles of historical faith.

7. Their testimonies extended to all the particulars of our

Saviour's history.

8. As related by the four Evangelists.

PAGZ

SECTION IV.

116

1. Character of the times in which the Christian religion was

propagated.

2. And of many who embraced it.

3. Three eminent and early instances.

4. Multitudes of learned men who came over to it.

5. Belief in our Saviour's history, the first motive to their

conversion.

6. The names of several Pagan philosophers who were Christ-

ian converts.

SECTION V.

118

1. The learned Pagans had means and opportunities of in-

forming themselves of the truth of our Saviour's history:

2. From the proceedings,

3. The character, sufferings,

4. And miracles, of the persons who published it.

5. How these first apostles perpetuated their tradition, by

ordaining persons to succeed them.

6. How their successors in the three first centuries preserved

their tradition.

7. That five generations might derive this tradition from

Christ to the end of the third century.

8. Four eminent Christians that delivered it down success-

ively to the year of our Lord 254.

9. The faith of the four above-mentioned persons, the same

with that of the churches of the East, of the West, and of

Egypt.

10. Another person added to them, who brings us to the year

343, and that many other lists might be added in as direct and

short a succession.

11. Why the tradition of the three first centuries more au-

thentic than that of any other age, proved from the conversa-

tion of the primitive Christians.

12. From the manner of initiating men into their religion.

13. From the correspondence between the churches.

14. From the long lives of several of Christ's disciples, of

which two instances.

Section VI.

125

1. The tradition of the apostles secured by other excellent

institutions ;

2. But chiefly by the writings of the evangelists.

3. The diligence of the disciples and first Christian converts

to send abroad these writings.

4. That the written account of our Saviour was the same with

that delivered by tradition :

6. Proved from the reception of the gospel by those churches

which were established before it was written;

6. From the uniformity of what was believed in the several

churches;

7. From a remarkable passage in Irenæus.

8. Records which are now lost, of use to the three first cen-

turies, for confirming the history of our Saviour

9. Instances of such records.

SECTION VII.

129

1. The sight of miracles in those ages a further confirmation of

Pagan philosophers in the Christian faith.

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