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KEY TO THE EXERCISES.

PART II.

ORTHOGRAPHY.

CHAPTER I.

Containing corrections of the false Orthography arranged under

the Rules.

RULE I.

Grammar, p. 37. Exercises, p. 47.

It is no great merit to spell properly; but a great defect to do it incorrectly.

Jacob worshipped his Creator, leaning on the top of his staff

We may place too little, as well as too much, stress upon dreams.

Our manners should be neither gross, nor excessively refined.

RULE II.

A cur signifies a chariot of war, or a small carriage of burden.

In the names of drugs and plants, the mistake in a word may endanger life.

Nor undelightful is the ceaseless hu"?
To him who muses through the woods at noon.

B

The fin of a fish is the limb by which he balances his body, and moves in the water.

Many a trap is laid to insnare the feet of youth.

Many thousand families are supported by the simple business of making mats.

RULE TII.

We should subject our fancies to the government of reason.

If thou art seeking for the living amongst the dead, thou weariest thyself in vain.

If we have denied ourselves of sinful pleasures, we shall be great gainers in the end.

We shall not be the happier for possessing talents and affluence, unless we make a right use of them.

The truly good mind is not dismayed by poverty, afflictions, or death.

RULE IV.

It is a great blessing to have a sound mind, uninfluenced by fanciful humours.

Common calamities, and common blessings, fall heavily upon the envious.

The comeliness of youth are modesty and frankness ; of age, condescension and dignity.

When we act against conscience, we become the destroyers of our own peace.

We may be playful, and yet innocent; grave, and yet corrupt. It is only from general conduct that our true character can be portrayed.

RULE V.

When we bring the lawmaker into contempt, we have in effect annulled his laws.

By deferring our repentance, we accumulate our sorrows.

The pupils of a certain ancient philosopher were not, during their first years of study, permitted to ask any questions.

We all have many failings and lapses to lament and re

cover.

There is no affliction with which we are visited that may not be improved to our advantage.

The Christian Lawgiver has prohibited many things which the heathen philosophers allowed.

RULE VI.

Restlessness of mind disqualifies us both for the enjoyment of

peace and the performance of our duty. The arrows of calumny fall harmlessly at the feet of virtue.

The road to the blissful regions is as open to the peasant as to the king.

A chilness, or shivering of the body, generally precedes a fever.

To recommend virtue to others, our lights must shine brightly, not dully.

The silent stranger stood amaz’d to see
Contempt of wealth and wilful poverty.

RULE VII.

The warmth of disputation destroys that sedateness of mind which is necessary to discover truth.

All these with ceaseless praise his works behold,
Both day and night.

In all our reasonings, our minds should be sincerely employed in the pursuit of truth.

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