Imágenes de páginas
PDF
EPUB

OF

PRACTICAL GEOMETRY

FOR

MECHANICS,

AS INTRODUCTORY TO EVERY BRANCH

OF

MATHEMATICAL DRAWING.

By W. PEASE,

Late of the Royal Laboratory Department, Woolwich,
Professor of Mathematical Drawing to the principal establishments
for preparing, Cadets for the Royal Military Colleges of Sandhurst,
Woolwich, and Addiscombe; and Lecturer on Geometry and Natural
Philosophy to the London Institutions, and on nery, Projectiles,
and Mechanics to the Royal Artillery.

DEDICATED BY EXPRESS PERMISSION TO

H. R, H, PRINCE ALBERT.

LONDON:

SIMPKIN AND MARSHALL, STATIONERS' COURT,

AND SOLD BY ALL BOOKSELLERS.

(1848)

James Black, Powis Street, Woolwich.

Entered at Stationers' Hall.

[graphic][subsumed][subsumed][merged small][merged small]

Sir,

In acknowledging the very great honor your Royal Highness has conferred, by granting me permission to dedicate to you my little work, I scarcely know which to admire most, your Royal Highness's condescension to myself, or the consideration you evince towards English Mechanics. From the first of your Royal Highness's entering this country, the amiable qualities you have displayed, have won for you the esteem of the whole empire, and your Royal Highness may rest assured that none are more loyal and sincere in their attachment to yourself, and to your beloved Queen, than British Artisans.

That it may please God to bless Her Majesty and your Royal Highness, with a long succession of happy years, realizing the undiminished affection of a most devoted people, is the sincere prayer of

Your Royal Highness's
Most humble, obedient, and grateful Servant,

W. PEASE.

P R E FACE.

AMONG the auspicious events which have marked the prosperous reign of Her present Majesty, one of the most gratifying to every liberal mind has been, the deep interest which the rich and influential have evinced in promoting the moral and intellectual happiness of the working classes. Encouraged by their contributions and countenance, societies have been formed; theatres and suitable rooms for philosophical objects, have been erected; and a thirst for knowledge has been induced; in neighbourhoods, where, had mechanics been left to their own resources, such projects would have been considered altogether utopian. And at this time, artisans in every large town have the privilege of attending expensive lectures, and reading scientific works, which a few years ago were exclusively confined to the higher classes.

Ranked among the best friends of the mechanic, stands the name of His Royal Highness Prince Albert, the Patron of the Westminster Literary, Scientific, and Mechanics' Institution; whose noble example has doubtless induced many other distinguished personages to consider the claims, and to contribute to the elevation of character, of the humbler classes of society.

« AnteriorContinuar »