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OR,

A DESCRIPTION OF THE

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WORLD.

IN THREE PARTS.

PART 1.-GEOGRAPHICAL ORTHOGRAPHY,

DIVIDED AND ACCENTED.

PART II.-A GRAMMAR OF GEOGRAPHY,

TO BE COMMITTED TO MEMORY.

PART III.-A DESCRIPTION OF THE EARTH,
Manners and Customs of the Inhabitants, Manufactures,
Commerce, Government, Natural and Artificial

Curiosities, &c.To be read in Classes.

ACCOMPANIED WITH AN ATLAS.

To which is added,

An Easy Method of constructing Maps, illustrated by Plates.

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BOSTON:
PRINTED AND PUBLISHED BY LINCOLN & EDMANDS,

No. 53 Cornbill.

1820.
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Dear Sir,

Prince Edward, (Va.) June 20, 1819. I have given Adams' Geography a careful petusal, and am happy to have it in my power to say, that it very far exceeds any work of the kind that has hitherto came under my observation. I was so much pleased to have it in my power to reeommend so valuable a school book to students in geography, that in order to introduce it into more general use, 1 took the liberty of putting it into the hands of Rev. Mr. Lyle, an eminent Judge of such a work, who is in the constant babit of teaching geography, that I might obtain his recommendation also.

Mr. Lyle gives me liberty to state in his behalf, that it is so far superior to any other work of the kind hitherto seen by bim, that so soon as he can arrange the classes of his school for its re. ception and procure a sufficient number of copies, he will introduce it into his school. If these candid observations are calculated in your opinion, to give this valuable stranger a more general introduction, as well as more welcome reception in the schools and families in your neighbourhood, make use of them for the purpose.

Yours, T. A. STEPHENSON.

Philadelphia, June 9, 1820. The Geography by Daniel Adams, A. M. as far as my judgment extends, is one of the happi. est of efforts for imparting profit, popularity and pleasure to the science it teaches. The accentuation of difficult words in the first part, is as necessary and useful as the outlines to be committed to memory in the second part, are select and judicious. In part the third the Author has avoided servility in copying from the works of others, and in a style, neat and attractive, has exhibited the state of Nations and Cities, not as they presented themselves in the last or former centuries, but as they now exist. The work discovers the extensive reading of the Author, and a felicity of tal. ent in fixing on the facts which are best calculated to inform and edify I wish the work a very extensive circulation.

WILLIAM STAUGHTON.

DISTRICT OF MASSACHUSETTS, to wit;

District Clerk's Office. BE IT REMEMBERED, That on the twenty-first of May, A. D. 1816, and in the fortieth year of the Independence of the United States of America, Lincoln & Edmands, of the said district, have deposited in this office the title of a book, the right whereof they claim as Proprietors, in the words following, 10 wit:

Geography; or, a Description of the World. In three parts. Part 1. Geographical Orthography, divided and accented. Part 1 A Grammar of Geography, to be committed to memory. Part 111. A Description of the Earth, Manners and Customs of the Inhabitants, Manufactures, Commerce, Government, Natural and Artificial Curiosities, &c. to be read in Classes. Accompanied with an Atlas. To which is added, An easy Method of constructing Maps, illustrated by Plates. For the Use of Schools and Academies. By Daniel Adams, A.M. Author of the scholar's Arithmetic, &c.08.

In conformity to the Act of the Congress of the United States, entitled, “ An Act for the and Proprietors-of such Copies, during the time therein titled, “An Act supplementary to an Act, entitled, An Act for the Encouragement of Learn. ing, by securing the Copies of Maps, Charts and Books, to the Authors and Proprietors of such Copies during the times therein mentioned ; and extending the benefits thereof to the Arts of Designing, Engraving and Etching Historical, and other prints.

JOHN W. DAVIS,
Clerk of the District of Massachusetts

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PREFACE.

GEOGRAPHY can be successfully studied only by the use of Maps. The patural and artificial divisions of the earth, the courses of rivers, and the relative position of cities and towns, are mechanical in their nature, as much so as the letters of the alphabet; and any attempt to communicate a knowledge of these objects by verbal descriptions, only, without the use of maps or an artificial globe, is as absurd as would be an attempt to learn a child to write, by verbal dissertations on the shapes of the several letters, without exhibiting a copy of them before him.

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Hence the treatise here presented to the public is accompanied with an Atlas, between which and the book there is an intimate relation. It is from the Atlas that the boundaries of countries, the direction of the principa! ranges of mountains, the courses and the outlets of rivers, and generally the situation of towns, &c. are intended to be learnt; the paines of which in the book are printed in Italic characters, as a standing admonition to the pupil, whenever they occur, to consult his maps ;-all which may be seen explained more at large in a note, page 24.

The book is exhibited in three distinct Parts, and yet forming one connected whole ; which peculiar feature every instructer, it is presumed, will with pleasure recognize.

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In the first part the pupil acquires the spelling and the pronunciation of the names of those kingdoms, countries, mountaios, rivers, seas, lakes, islands, &c. which in the two succeeding Parts are more particularly to engage his attention ; and it is important that he be able correctly to pronounce and to spell the words it contains.

The second part contains the principles of Geography, in the most plain, concise, and natural language, much on the plan of Goldsmith and Guy, and is that part designed to be committed to memory.

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