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BEMROSE & SONS,

PRINTERS,

LONDON AND DERBY.

CONTENTS.

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ANTE-Nicene FATHERS AND THE MOSAIC ORIGIN OF THE PENTATEUCH,
THE.By the Rev. Newell Woolsey Wells

465
BIBLE STUDY : JESUS AT THE WELL OF SYCHAR.--By James G. Vose, D.D. 632
BIBLICAL Notes : THE SPIRITS IN PRISON.-By T. W. Chambers . 154
BROWNING, Mrs.—By Mrs. Theodosia Warren
BURIAL OF THE DEAD IN THE EARLY CHRISTIAN CHURCH, THE (from

the German of Professor Schultz).-By Professor G. H. Schodie 623 CHRISTIAN PHILOSOPHY, WHAT WE

BY.-By Noah Porter,
D.D., LL.D.
CURSE UPON NATURE, THE.-By Franklin Johnson, D.D.
DANIEL, THE HISTORICAL CHAPTERS OF, ATTESTED BY CONTEMPORARY
RECORDS.-By William Hayes Ward, D.D.

431 DARWINISM, CHRISTIAN ASPECTS OF.-By the Rev. J. M. Whiton

56 Emerson, RALPH WALDO.-By Professor George Prentice

29 HOLY SPIRIT THE NEED OF THE CHURCH, THE.--By President G. D. B. Pepper, D.D.

297 IMMORTALITY AND SCIENCE.--By Professor James T. Bixby

278 IMMORTALITY, The INTUITION OF.-By President Geo. T. Gould, D.D. . 376 INFANT SALVATION AND ITS THEOLOGICAL BEARINGS.-By Professor George L. Prentiss, D.D.

321 INSPIRATION, THEories or.-By Alvah Hovey, D.D., LL.D.

359 JESU's, The DIALECTIC METHOD OF.-By the Rev. Richard Montague . 521 John the Baptist's Message to Jesus : AN EXEGETICAL STUDY OF MATTHEW X1. 3.-By Professor A. Spaeth, D.D.

307 Lost WORD, THE THEOLOGY OF THE, AND THE MANIFESTATION OF THE

Divine NAME.---By the Rev. Dr. J. F. Garrison
LUTHER AND LOYOLA : Their INFLUENCE ON MEN.--By Alfred A.
Mitchell, Esq.

115 MADONNA DI SAN Sisto, THE.--By the Rev. J. 1. Mombert, D.D. . MAN, THE CHRISTIAN CONCEPTION OF.-By Professor Stearns

453 Milton AND TENNYSON.-By the Rev. Henry J. Van Dyke, Junr. Minister's VOCATION AND AVOCATION, The.-By the Rev. J. Brainerd Thrall

597 MUSIC AND WORSHIP.-By Professor Potter.

610 NATURAL BEAUTY, THE MINISTRY OF.By the Rev. Edwin Pond Parker, D.D.

347 ORIGIN OF MAN, THE RECENT AND SUPERNATURAL, CONSIDERED FROM A

PURELY SCIENTIFIC Point of View.--By the Rev. W. D. Wilson,
D.D., LL.D.

225 Positive Faith, The Duty, ValUE AND POWER OF.-By Samuel C. Bartlett, D.D.

417 PRAYER, ConditiONS OF Successful.—By the Rev. Dr. W. M. Taylor . 137

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Lobb's

Theological Quarterly.

1.—THE THEOLOGY OF THE LOST WORD AND THE

MANIFESTATION OF THE DIVINE NAME.

BY THE REV. DR. J. F. GARRISON.

THE writings that compose the Hebrew Scriptures and the Christian Canon are pervaded by a unity of thought and fact, amidst a diversity of conditions, which is as unique in the history of literature as is the career of the Jewish people in the chronicle of nations. It is without a parallel, or even a resemblance, in the mental or religious development of any other people. The nearest approach to it is the Sacred Classics of the Chinese ; but theirs is the unity of purposed repetition, and not a unity combined with growth. Their whole spirit is embodied in the saying of Confucius, who claims only to be “a transmitter, not a maker ;' one who is "fond of antiquity, and seeks knowledge there.” The best praise of any work, with them, is that it reproduces most nearly what has been said before ; and the highest aim of their typical “superior man ” is to recall the past unchanged, and so fix this that it shall remain unchangeable. The writings which are collected in the Bible show, on the contrary, a continual and intended progress. Each writer not only adds something to what has gone before, but speaks mainly because he has somewhat to add. Yet his “word ” always fits into that which has preceded it, has an essential connection with this, cannot be adequately understood apart from it, and sheds a new light backward on some part of what has been already written ; is, in fact, a true and legiti

VOL. I.

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mate growth of the same spiritual life. The later differing
from the earlier only as the bud, blossom, and fruit differ
from each other and from the seed ; all being involved
potentially in the germ, and all pervaded by the one
common life, which has unfolded each in its due place and
order. The main features of this unity are so clearly evident,
that the world unconsciously has recognized it by its very
title of “the Bible”—that is, “ the Book”—implying thus that,
notwithstanding all the diversity of circumstances, variety of
authorship, and fifteen centuries of time which are combined
in it, yet it is one " Book” in spirit, one in its accepted basis
of fact, and even by its opponents is treated and criticised as
essentially one in truth or falsehood. Besides these general
characteristics of unity, there are also many subtler trains of
thought that do not lie upon the surface, but which run
through the various portions of these Scriptures, and testify,
in even a more wonderful manner than those usually recog-
nised, to one common source of origin and one common
spirit guiding all its authorship. Some of these are wholly
within the text, and show themselves, in ever growing force
and number, to all zealous students into the full connection
and significance of the different portions of the Bible; while
there are others that are dependent for their explanation,
still more for a true apprehension of their value, upon a
comparison of the contents of the Scriptures with facts and
lines of thought outside of their own letter. One of this.
latter class, which though often alluded to is seldom recog-
nised in its full import, is the use of the Divine “NAME”
throughout the Bible, and the relation it bears to God's
manifestation of His “Word,” in both the Old Testament
and the New. That there was great importance attached to
the Name" of God is evident from the mode and frequency
with which this expression is employed in every part of the
Hebrew Scriptures, and far more than is commonly noticed
in the Christian Canon. In the Old Testament The Name
of the LORD," or "in the Name of the LORD,” is applied con-
tinually, under circumstances that imply the high regard
attached to it in the opinion of the writer. It often stands
as a mode of personification of the Divine Being Himself, or
as the self-active energy of some of His attributes ; is, in
fact, only another way of saying that “God” or the LORD
does thus and so; and hence must be regarded, in very
many places, as a true synonym for God. Take, for example,
among the many illustrations of these uses that may be
found in every part of the Old Testament, these : “The

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