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€c God, and kindness to the poor, are figu"ratively called sacrifices, pleasing and ac"ceptable to God;", and that they are so called, as being attended with " a pious and "well-disposed mind." He says, likewise, *c Proper sacrifices were understood to be "pleasing and acceptable to God in the "fame manner, viz. as being attended tc with a pious and well-disposed mind." These are the Dr's premises, and his only premises. And I know of no conclusions that can be rightly drawn from them, relating to the cafe in hand, but the two following, viz. 1st. That expences, labours, pains, sufferings for God, kindness to the poor, and, likewise, Jewish sacrifices, were all pleasing and acceptable to God, only as they were attended with a pious and welldisposed mind. zdly. That because expences, labours, pains, sufferings for God, kindness to the poor, are acceptable and pleasing to God on the fame account that Jewish sacrifices were pleasing, and acceptable to him, the former are, for this particular reason, called sacrifices. Now, as to the jirjl of these two conclusions, every body, I think, mult fee, that it makes nothing for the Dr's purpose. And as to the second, it is directly against him; because it makes the sameness of the ground of acceptance, to be the reason why expences, labours, pains, sufferings for God, and

kindkindness to the poor, are figuratively called sacrifices; and so leaves neither room nor reason for thinking that they are so called, because sacrifices were symbols of them. In order to draw any such conclusion as the last mentioned, from the Dr's premises, an uncommon stretch of sophistry will be necessary: and till it is both drawn, and shewn to follow, from them, the texts here quoted by the Dr. will be of no manner of service to him in this affair. But to proceed.

Scripture-evidence produced by Dr. Taylor, continued.

§. 28. The Dr. fays, " This leads us to conceive, that probably the pouring out "the blood of every sacrifice at the bottom *c of the altar, denoted the readiness and "resolution, or, however, the duty of the "person who offered the sacrifice, to lay "down his life in adherence to God. "And whereas our Lord, who was both ,c sacrifice and sacrificer, (Heb. ix. 14. "Eph. v. 2. He gave, or offered himself a "sacrifice to God,) is stiled a lamb without "spot and blemish, to denote his perfect "purity and holiness; this suggests, that "the sacrifices being without spot and blemish "denotes, that the sacrificer ought to per"form the service, or to lead his whole

"life, "life, with the utmost sincerity and sanc

"tity of heart. Other ritual actions, as

"washing the inwards and feet, &c< I doubt

"not, had their spiritual meaning; which

"would not be difficult to be understood

"by a people that were so much versed

"in moral figures and emblems. But as

"I am confined to scripture-evidence, I

"must insist upon nothing but what is

"there particularly explained. And what

." we have found there, is sufficient to my

"present purpose e."

Examination.

§. 29. In the conclusion of the foregoing paragraph, the Dr. says, " The fouls "of them who were flain for the word "of God, are represented to be under the tC altar, Rev. vi. 9, 10. the very place "where the blood, or soul of the sacrifice was "poured out, Lev. iv. 7, T8, 25, 30." To which he subjoins in the beginning of this paragraph, "This leads us to conceive, "that probably the pouring out the blood "of every sacrifice at the bottom of the *C altar, denoted the readiness and resolu** tion, or, however, the duty of the per"son who offered the sacrifice, to lay down ** his life in adherence to God."—The

* See Scripture-doctrine of Atonement examined, Chap. II. §. 23.

following observations will shew the weakness of this reasoning.

§. 30. The blood of all sacrifices was ordered to be poured out at the bottom of the altar; and no other blood was poured out there. When, therefore, any blood was seen at the bottom of the altar, it was natural, and even necessary, to conclude, that that blood was the blood of such animals as had been flain, and lost their lives, on a religious account. Wherefore, when St. John saw, in a vision, the souls, or blood, of men, under the altar in heaven; this representation gave him ground to conclude, that the blood, which he saw, was the blood, or fouls, of martyrs, or of such persons as had been slain for the word of God, or on a religious account. The representation itself was a sufficient ground for this conclusion. But I cannot conceive, what could give any ground to the Dr. for imagining, that this visionary representation, or the conclusion which St. John might have drawn from it, should " lead us to con"ceive, that probably the pouring out the "blood of every sacrifice at the bottom of "the altar, denoted the readiness and reso"lution, or, however, the duty, of the "person who offered the sacrifice, to lay "down his life in adherence to God."— The fouls, or blood, of the martyrs, under the altar in heaven, was a lively represenE tation tation of what they had already done; of the resolution, and courage, and readiness with which they had acted on earth, in laying down their lives in adherence to God; and not, as the Dr's way of reasoning intimates, of the resolution and readiness with which they were to act, or obliged to act, for the future, in laying down their lives again in adherence to God. As far, therefore, as I can fee, the only conclusion, relating, to the meaning of the rite of pouring out the blood of the Jewish sacrifices at the bottom of the altar, that can be drawn from this visionary representation, is, that the blood there poured out, was the blood of such animals as had been flain and offered in sacrifice, or lost their lives on a religious account. Upon the whole, it appears, that the Dr's opinion about the meaning of that rite is a mere fancy of his own, destitute of all support from that passage in the Revelation of St. John, upon which he grounds it.

§. 31. The Dr. subjoins, " And whereas "our Lord, who was himself both a sa"crifice, and sacrificer, (Tie gave, or offered "himself a sacrifice to God, Eph. v. 2. "Heb. ix. 14.) is sliled a lamb without *c spot and blemish, to denote his perfect "purity and holiness; this suggests, that "the sacrifices being without spot or ble"mish, denotes that the sacrificer ought

"to

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