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they forget the probability there is, that the next mutation of this literary chameleon will exhibit him—as violent and extreme an advocate for innovations, as he now is for opposing and resisting them. In truth, the change is so confidently expected by those best informed in the politics of that paper, that no one will feel surprised, if, before a week, The Times should once more appear as the organ of Mr. Newman's party, and the partisan of those who desire to Romanize the church. This being the case, it seems really desirable to preserve its last attack on the Archbishop, as a record of what a paper of such circulation will venture to print. Such a specimen of Mar-Prelacy it would be difficult to match. Nor is it possible to avoid seeing, that if the Primate had written in that authoritative tone which The Times would recommend—unless that exercise of authority was directed to give sanction to the notions of clerical duty which The Times admires, and to denounce every clergyman who should not conform to The Times' interpretation of the law and the rubricThe Times would have been the very first to raise the cry of “ Protestant Popes," and “ Lordly Prelates," and "Spiritual Despotism." The indecency of such proceedings needs no exposure; it is disgusting all respectable persons of whatever party.

The Times, therefore, may speak for itself: “ In contrast to the panegyric that hailed the publication of the Archbishop of Canterbury's letter, we have, it seems, incurred some odium, by not only refusing to applaud, but even presuming to go so far as to censure, it. We have spoken our mind certainly, and we have spoken sincerely. As a public document, it is, of course, liable to comment and criticism, and we have as yet found no occasion to regret having expressed ourselves as we did. We shall rejoice to be undeceived if we are wrong, and will not fail to acknowledge our mistake upon accurate evidence that we are so. At present, we remain unconvinced of the great value that it is sought to attach to this circular ; and, considering the position, the influence, the responsibility, of the first dignitary of the Church, we do not hesitate to repeat, that under such a crisis the document in question is unworthy, unsatisfactory, and, for any practical purpose, utterly insufficient. We do not see to what use it can be applied, nor what results can be elicited from it. In one way undoubtedly it is useful; but when a dilemma obtains a dubious solution which leaves the primary difficulty untouched, the advocates of its conflicting propositions will not fail to adopt on either side their own solution, and thereby enhance the weight of their own arguments. Just so with the Archbishop's letter ; each party claims it as a triumph—each party looks upon it as an omen of success—each party is more or less flattered in it, and naturally appeals to it as a decision in their behalf. Sentences are weighed-expressions are siftedepithets are measured by Churchmen of the different sides—and the presumption rests with both that the balance is in their favour. This is soinewhat like the visit of condolence and congratulation of the great ladies at the Hall to the family of the vicar of Wakefield after their accident on the way to church. First, having heard of the calamity, they were sorry ; but then, when they found they had not been hurt, they were glad. But still they regretted the fright it must have occasioned ; and then again, when they learnt they had been scarcely frightened at all, they were glad again. Or, like the good-natured man' who grumbles out scraps of sentiment with old Croaker as an austere moralist, to please him, and the next moment is heard to laugh vociferously with the ladies in the next room, as a silly beau, to please them; so (if our comparisons be not irreverent) does the letter of Dr. Howley speak fair alike to all, and with much kindness, but no

great energy of character, strive hard to gain the goodwill of all, and to delight each party by its apparent bias to their opinions.

“His letter has accordingly met with the fate of all half measures. The excessive amiability of the ladies from the Hall was soon ascertained at the vicarage to be something rather less estimable ; and the good-natured man,' before long, had earned the contempt of his circle. The Archbishop's letter has produced no such results as its admirers anticipated. It has not softened down party asperities by its suavity. It has not pacified the violent animosities it professes to deal with. Neither party will now, more than before, concede one jot to the otherthe passions of both are unallayed. Mr. Courtenay and his class are as refractory, as presumptuous, and as dictatorial as ever. They feel that they are far from being discountenanced, and therefore will not readily give in, and thus there is every semblance of the war being waged as extensively and as furiously as before the appearance of what was supposed to be a settlement of the contest. It is a pity that the Archbishop or some one of his learned compeers or chaplains did not remind him of that significant intimation ;

• Nec quarta loqui persona laboret ;' for then, the good Archbishop need not have toiled into the arena where the two contending hosts and the Bishop of Exeter were already deep in the struggle. If he did make up his mind to such a course, it should have been with a dignified step and a lofty mien, as one authorized to rule the storm and bid the warfare end. It should have been with intelligible and emphatic phraseology calculated to make its impression and do its work skilfully and at once. It should have been with language such as suited an Archbishop of Canterbury, roused into action by the factious movements of clerical agitation, and prompt to interpose the irresistible energy of his rank and office.

“We do not say that there were no difficulties in the way of an adjustment of this kind; but it was from the necessity of meeting these very difficulties, and counteracting them, that bis Grace thought he was called upon to make himself heard. Did it become him, then, or the body whom he addressed, to issue a studied, hesitating, undecided address, calculated to satisfy none, and yet composed to conciliate all? We yield not to any in respect or veneration for the prelate who now fills this high office; but we cannot forget that there is a price to be paid for eminence in ecclesiastical as in all other stations which may fairly be claimed from the possessor, — and that is, responsibility. On this score, then, we repeat, that the archbishop, deeming himself imperiously called on to interfere, should have bethought himself of what his duty sternly demanded, and should have prepared to meet the crisis with the firmness and determination that bespoke not only plain, kind, unassuming Dr. Howley, but the Primate of all England."

Such, then, is the treatment which this unprincipled paper has given to one whose Christian meekness and wisdom it is as incapable of appreciating, as of understanding (for it is impossible to be more profoundly ignorant of the merits of the case), the necessity which a man of learning would feel of speaking with caution and moderation.

As to the disputes between the laity and clergy in some places they are subsiding. They will soon cease. There is, in spite of every thing which unprincipled men can do to irritate, and to exaggerate the extent of exasperation,-a really kind feeling towards the clergy, and a real and earnest desire on the part of the clergy to please all men, as far as truth and conscience will allow them, as being the servants of all. And where things are so, matters will find their level; and the angry waves will subside ; and not a whit the slower, because (with all due deference to the wisdom of The Times) authority has come forward, not as the partisan of any, but as the parent of all,

Some persons, however, seem anxious for legislation ; and it has been proposed to petition for a commision from the Crown to settle these disputed points. Considering the materials of which the House of Commons is composed, and the fact that the commissioners would be only such as should be recommended to her Majesty by her ministers—in other words, by those who should happen to represent the majority of the House of Commons at the time,-this seems rather a hazardous experiment. And, after all, what is there to render it necessary ? If there be good sense and good feeling in the country, the Primate's letter will put an end to innovations, and stop the agitation of the surplice and offertory controversies, just as effectually as any act of the legislature could do. At all events it will be time enough to attempt so serious a measure, if it should unfortunately be proved that the Church is not to be governed by its own sense of right.

ECCLESIASTICAL INTELLIGENCE.

ORDINATIONS.
Bishop of Lichfield, Eccleshall

Dec. 22, 1844.
Bishop of St. David's, Lampeter
Bishop of Sodor and Man, St. George's Chapel, Douglas, Dec. 29, 1844.
Bishop of Norwich, Norwich Cathedral

Jan. 25, 1845.

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Abud, Henry
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Deane, Fras. Hugh ...
Dunn, T. H.
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Gordon, John.
Hamilton, Edward J.
Hicks, John
Hughes, Henry
Jones, J. P.

Oxford

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Avard, Theodore, J....
Beal, William
Bolton, Frederick S....
Brereton, Randle B.
Brereton, Thomas J.
Burgess, Robert .......
Cooke, Stephen A.
Claydon, Henry
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Freeman, Philip
Girling, Barry
Green, C. Wade
Gwyn, Henry N.......
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ORDINATIONS APPOINTED.

Bishop of, Ripon, Sunday, Feb. 16, at Bishop of Peterborough, on Sunday, Ripon. Feb. 16, at Peterborough.

Bishop of London, Sunday, May 18, Bishop of Lincolu, on Sunday, Feb. at London. 16, at Lincoln.

Bishop of Salisbury, for Bishop of Bishop of Salisbury, Sunday, Feb. 16, Bath and Wells, Sunday, May 18, at at Salisbury,

Wells.

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The Lord Bishop of Lichfield gives | Anson, Rev. Fred. the younger, to the notice, that all Graduates of the Univer- place and dignity of Canon of her sity of Cambridge who shall offer them- Majesty's Free Chapel of St. George, selves as Candidates for admission into Windsor. the order of Deacons alter the year 1845, Arnott, Rev. Sam., of Emman. Coll., will be expected to bring certificates of Camb., to be Assist. C. of Brentwood, their having passed the Voluntary Theo- Essex. logical Examination in that university. Atkinson, Rev. Geo. Jas., to the V. of

The Lord Bishop of Ely, in conse- Eagle, Lincolnshire ; pat., Sir W. A, quence of a paragraph in the “Globe" Ingilby, Bart. newspaper of the ilth December last, Austin, Rev. Thos., C. of Haughton-lenotifying that “ Candidates for Orders Skerne, to the R. of Redmarshall. will not be received by his Lordship Bagley, Rev. Thos., of Queens' Coll. without a certificate that they have passed Camb., to be C. of St. Philip's, Beththe Voluntary Examination," desires to nal Green. state that his name was included in that | Baines, Rev. John, of St. John's Coll., notice by mistake; but that such certifi- Oxf., to be Assist. C. of Camden Town, cate will exempt candidates for Holy St. Pancras, Middlesex. Orders in his diocese from the private Baird, Rev. James, of Queen's Coll., examination of the Bishop, three months Camb., to be Assist. C. of Holy previously.

Trinity Chapel, Tottenham, Middlesex.

Baker, Rev. H.W.,of Trio. Coll., Camb., CONFIRMATIONS APPOINTED.

to be Assist. C.of Gt. Horkesley, Essex. The Lord Bishop of London proposes

Bandinel, Rev. J., to the C. of Belstead to hold Confirmations in the county of

Parva, Suffolk. Essex, at the under-mentioned times and

Barton, Rev. Thomas, of Sutton St. Ann's, places ; viz: - Tuesday, March 25,

near Loughborough, to the P. C. of the Romford, at 2; Thursday, March 27,

Holy Trinity, Richmond, Yorkshire. Orsett, at 11; Friday, March 28, Great

Barnard, Rev. Mordaunt, to the R. of

Liule Barfield, Essex, Burstead, at 10, Rayleigh, at 2 ; Saturday, March 29, Rochford, at 10; Monday,

Beckett, Rev. Wm. Thos., to the C. of March 31, Brentwood, at 10, Chelms.

Lacock, Wilts. ford, at 2 ; Tuesday, April 1, Southrrin

Bishop, Rev. Geo. Nassau, to the

V. of Gt. Clacion, with the Donative ster, at 10, Maldon, at 2; Wednesday, April 2, All Saints' Church, Witham, at

of Little Holland, Essex, 10, Bocking, at 2 ; Thursday, April 3,

Bishop, Rev. Wm., of Corp. Ch. Coll., Great Yeldham, at 10, Trinity Church,

Camb., to be Assist. C. of St. John's Halstead, at 2 ; Friday, April 4, Mistley, Blomfield, Rev. J. C.,

of Exeter Coll.,

Chupel, Epping, Essex, at 1; Saturday, April 5, Harwich, at half.past 9, Great Bentley, at 2 ; Mon

Oxford, to be Assist. C. of Romford,

Essex. day, April 7, St. Peter's Church, Colchester, at 10, Coggeshall, at 2 ; Thurs

Bodley, Rev. W. Hamilton, to the C. of day,April 24,Woodford, at 11, St. John's,

St. Paul's, Cheltenham, Stratford, at 2.

Bonney, Ven. Dr. H. K., Archd. of Bed. The Lord Bishop of Winchester pur

ford, to the Archdeaconry of Lincoln, poses to hold Confirmations throughout

to which a Caponry is annexed, and

not the Rev. Wm. Moore, D.D., as the county of Surrey, in the months of

stated in our last Magazine. May and June next.

Bowcott, Rev. W., to the R. of Llanvillo,

Brecon. PREFERMENTS & CLERICAL

Boothby, Rev. Mr., C. of Bishopthorpe, APPOINTMENTS.

to the V. of Nunburnholme, Yorksh., Allen, Rev. Humphrey, to the P. C., of pat., the Archbishop.

Trinity Church, Clifton, in the city and Bradney, Rev. J. C., to the R. of Greet, A county of Bristol; pats., the trustees. Shropshire; pat., T. H. Hope, Esq. mbrose, Rev. John, of St. John's Coll. Brine, Rev. John Perceval, Fell. of Camb., to the C. of Tolleshunt Major, King's Coll., Camb., to the C. of St. Essex.

Mary's, Leeds.

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