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alone; but the other was living, and productive of corresponding works, even all that their situation would admit of, which is trembling. I hope I have herein stated your full meaning. To this I offer the following objections :

“1. The use of the term also, ver. 19, is manifestly expressive of likeness, and not of contrast. If kar be rendered and or even, it will amount to the same thing. Thou believest that there is one God;' a great matter truly !* and the devils believe and tremble : or even the devils believe and tremble. None of these forms convey the idea of contrast, but of likeness. Each of them is equal to saying, “This is no more than is true of devils ; nor indeed quite so much : yet their faith amounts to nothing; what therefore can you think of yours?".

“2. If the introduction of the faith of devils were designed as a contrast, the reasoning would admit of some other contrast as well this. Let us make the experiment. T believest that there is one God, thou well, the sincere Christian also beli. obeys.' To make sense of this, it is that instead of the conjunctive part or even, or also, it should be th alla, but; at least, to have

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your idea, it should have been the devils also believe, BUT tremble. On the other hand, make: the experiment of an instance of likeness, and the language is plain and easy. “Thou believest there is one God; a great matter truly! Felix also believed and trembled. .

“ The ground on which your position rests, is: the effect which is ascribed to the faith of devils-trembling, and which is not ascribed to that of nominal Christians. This effect you reckon among those corresponding works, which as you say always attend real faith. But this difference may prove that th faith of devils was real,

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alone; but the other was living, and productive of corresponding works, even all that their situation would admit of, which is trembling. I hope I have herein stated your full meaning. To this I offer the following objections :

“1. The use of the term also, ver. 19, is manifestly expressive of likeness, and not of contrast. If kar be rendered and or even, it will amount to the same thing. •Thou believest that there is one God;'. a great matter truly ! * and the devils believe and tremble : or even the devils believe and tremble. None of these forms convey the idea of contrast, but of likeness. Each of them is equal to saying, “This is no more than is true of devils ; nor indeed quite so much : yet their faith amounts to nothing ; what therefore can you think of

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“ 2. If the introduction of the faith of devils were designed as a contrast, the reasoning would admit of some other contrast as well as this. Let us make the experiment. “Thou. believest that there is one God, thou doest well, the sincere Christian also believes and obeys.' To make sense of this, it is necessary that instead of the conjunctive particle kai, and, or even, or also, it should be the disjunctive alla, but ; at least, to have comported with

* This I suppose to be the true meaning of the termsthou doest well, which is ironical.

your idea, it should have been the devils also believe, BUT;tremble. On the other hand, make the experiment of an instance of likeness, and the language is plain and easy. “Thou believest there is one God; a great matter truly! Felix also believed and trembled

." The ground on which your position rests, is the effect which is ascribed to the faith of devils-trembling, and which is not ascribed to that of nominal Christians. This effect you reckon among those. corresponding works, which as you say always attend real faith. But this difference may not prove that the faith of devils was real, and that of nominal Christians a mere pretence,' as you seem to understand it: it may only express a difference in the degree in which each party was impressed with the force of truth. The one was convinced that there was a God; but it was a mere speculation of the intellectual faculty, unaccompanied : with love; and being in circumstances wherein he saw no remarkable displays of his divine majesty, it made little or no impression upon his inind. The others also were couvinced that there was a God, and neither were their convictions accompanied with love ; yet being placed in circumstances wherein the awful majesty of heaven was continually before their eyes, they knew already in part by sad experience the truth of his threatenings, and trembled at the approach of greater torments. There was no more goodness'. in this treinbling than in that of a malefactor under the gallows. I am surprised therefore that you should reckon it among those corresponding works which always attend faith, if it really exists. What is it more than Felix felt under his convictions, and apprehensions of a judgment to come; who notwithstanding was far from being a believer, or possessing any of those corresponding works which the scriptures represent as the fruits of faith.

“ Nothing seems, (to you,) more certain than that when any person on earth believes Jesus, who is now invisible with equal assurance as the devils, he rejoices in hope, is aniinated by love to bim, and feels disposed to obey his will, and to resist his own evil inclinations.' If I were to say, few things appear to me more certain than the contrary, I should say the truth: but I wish to make what appears certain to me, evident, if it be possible, to my friend, and to his readers. If your position be true, the difference between , believers and devils avises entirely from their different circumstances. But if so, let me intreat you to consider whether consequences will not follow which yon would shudder to avow.

"1. Will it not follow that the doctrine taught by our Lord, in the parable of the rich man and Lazarus, is untrue ? Dives supposed that the awful realities which he witnessed and

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