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fresh occurring, at the monthly meeting, September the 22d, 1803, he held up my statement, as he supposed, as being 'next to nonsense.' Having seen a copy of what he said, I told him again, next time I saw him, that he had misunderstood me. He represented me as holding the peculiarity of redemption to consist in the sovereignty of it's application ; but I had said no such thing. At length he prints the sermon, avails himself of my correction, and yet sets off in his Appendix, as if he had not; takes my words at last, but distorts and perverts them. In the first three pages of his Appendix, he represents me as confounding a thing with it's application : whereas my words, even as quoted by himself, prove I do not.

"I place the peculiarity of redemption, not in the application of the atonement, which he all along sopposes me to do, but in the sovereign pleasure of God concerning it's application; between which there is an equal difference as between election and vocation.

“My sentiments may be seen in Hannah Adams's View of Religions, under the Article Calvinists, which was of my own drawing up.”

But I shall enter no farther upon this subject unnecessarily. I knew much about it at the time, and have many documents by me which justify me in accounting that this venerable and excellent man was betrayed into an excess

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of suspicion, &c. toward my departed friend : but I am sure the latter would not wish me to make the narrative of his life, a memorial of some imperfection of judgment or temper, in a man he so sincerely venerated, and who was made perfect before him.

It is simply from a regard to important truth, that I transcribe another letter to the same friend, in which Mr. B. is mentioned unavoidably. It was written a little before Mr. Sutcliff's death, about April, 1814.

“ I had not seen the Review of Mr. B.'s Works when I read yours, which was last night, on my return from Olney, but have seen it since. If Mr. B. meant no more than to intimate that a consciousness of a holy state of mind was not necessary to believing in Jesus, this were no more than we all say. But surely your construction of Mr. B. is what he himself would have disowned. All through his second chapter, (Glad Tidings,) be confounds a warrant to come to Christ, with coming to him. A sinner may be unwilling to come to Christ for life, and yet have a warrant to do so: but he cannot actually come to Christ for life, while he is unwilling. The title of that chapter is one thing, and it's ropuing title another; but he pleads for both : though when he comes to meet objertions, as in Chap. III. p. 129. he is obliged to contiue it to one. One half of his reasonings are aimed, if they aim at any thing, to prove that no boliness is necessary to coming to Christ, any more than to warrant our coming: and if so, faith must be an act of an uogodly mind, - I should not only admit that a consciousness of holiness is not necessary to coming to Christ, but that such consciousness is impossible. The power of sight is necessary to seeing; but no man can be conscious of possessing that power, but by seeing.

" You do not understand the propriety of calling that influence by wbich we are regenerated, physical: yet you call it supernatural, which is the same thing. The influence of means and motives is not supernatural. It is not physical as to what is produced. It is no new power, but the renewal of the moral state of those powers which we already possessed. But physical as applied to influence denotes the same as supernatural, and stands opposed to the influence of motives presented to the mind, wbich is commonly called moral influence. The holiness of man in innocence was physically produced, though the thing produced was moral. He was not persuaded, or induced to be holy, but created in righteousness and true holiness: and so are we in regeneration. If in the first instance we are regenerated by means, it is not a creation. See my Strictures on Sandemanianism, pp. 146, 147.

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“ The preaching of the gospel certainly has a tendency to bring the sinner back to God, but this it may have, and yet not be sufficient to accomplish it, without a supernatural interposition of divine power. The labours of Bunyan's four captains had a tendency to reduce Mansoul; but were not sufficient.

“ If new physical powers were produced, or necessary, men would be under a natural inability to believe : but the moral state of their hearts may be such, that nothing but a supernatural influence can remove it; wbile vet there is no other inability than that which arises from aversion. I am . Affectionately yours,

A. FULLER. “ P. S. If you have read the Eclectic Review for this month, you will see in the tirst article some things on this subject. If the evidence for the mind being renewed in order to believing in Christ, adduced in my Strictures on Sandemanianism pp. 137–142, be not sufficient, I can say no more"

The following letter I have also been particularly requested to insert, which he sent to the late Mr, M.Lean of Edinburgh, in 1797.

Dear Sir, If your letter had barely contained a statement of your ideas, on certain subjects on wbich

if they aim at any thing, to prove that no holiness is necessary to coming to Christ, any more than to warrant our coming: and if so, faith must be an act of an ungodly mind. - I should not only admit that a consciousness of holiness is not necessary to coming to Christ, but that such consciousness is impossible. The

power of sight is necessary to seeing; bụt no . man can be conscious of possessing that power, but by seeing.

“You do not understand the propriety of calling that influence by which we are regenerated, physical: yet you call it supernatural,' which is the same thing. The influence of means and motives is not supernatural. It is not physical as to what is produced. It is no new power, but the renewal of the moral state of those powers which we already possessed. But physical as applied to influence denotes the same as supernatural, and stands opposed to the influence of motives presented to the mind, wbich is commonly called moral influence. The holiness of man in innocence was physically produced, though the thing produced was moral. He was not persuaded, or induced to be holy, but created in righteousness and true holiness: and so are we in regeneration. If in the first instance we are regenerated by means, it is not a creation. See my Strictures on Sandemanianism, pp. 146, 147.

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