Imágenes de páginas
PDF
EPUB

The following books will serve to indicate the nature and extent of this requisition :

In Botany, Gray's How Plants Grow.
In.Physics, Balfour Stewart's Primer of Physics.
In Chemistry, Roscoe's Primer of Chemistry.

In Astronomy, Rolfe and Gillet's Handbook of the Stars (first 124 pages).

Candidates who offer Botany will be required to give evidence that they can analyze simple specimens ; and those who offer Physics or Chemistry, that they can perform simple experiments like those described in the Primers referred to above.

COURSE II. 1. Latin Grammar (including Prosody). 2. Latin Authors. Caesar, Gallic War, Books I. and II. ; Cicero,

; six orations and the Cato Major; Virgil, Aeneid, Books I. - VI.

3. Greek Grammar (including metres).

4. Greek Authors. Goodwin and Allen's Greek Reader, first 111 pages, or Xenophon's Anabasis, Books I. - IV. ; Homer's Iliad, Books I. and II., omitting the catalogue of ships.

5. Arithmetic. This requisition is the same as No. 9 of Course I.

6. Elementary Algebra. This requisition is the same as No. 10 of Course I.

7. Advanced Algebra. This subject, with the preceding, is regarded as embracing as much Algebra as is contained in the advanced textbooks, such as the larger Algebras of Todhunter, Loomis, Greenleaf, etc.

8. Plane Geometry. This requisition is the same as No. 11 of Course I.

9. Solid Geometry (as much as is contained in Peirce's Geometry).

10. Plane Trigonometry (by the Analytic Method; as much as is contained in the first six chapters of Peirce's Trigonometry, or in the large print of the first eight chapters of Chauvenet's Trigonometry).

11. The Elements of Plane Analytic Geometry (as much as is contained in Peck’s Analytic Geometry, pages 1-151, omitting Articles 40 - 43 54, 57 61, 72, 74 - 76, and the more difficult problems).

12 – 16. These requisitions are the same as Nos. 12 – 16 of Course I.

[ocr errors]

[ocr errors]

No particular text-book in Grammar is required ; but either Allen's or Harkness's Latin Grammar, and either Goodwin's or Hadley's Elementary Greek Grammar, will serve to indicate the nature and amount of the grammatical knowledge demanded.

In Latin the following pronunciation is recommended : à as in father, ă the same sound but shorter ; ē like é in fête, ě as in set; i as in machine, i as in sit; ō as in hole, as in nor; ū as in rude, ŭ as in put ; j like y in yeur, c and g like Greek k and

7. Instructors are requested to teach their pupils in pronouncing Greek to use the Greek accents, and to give (for example) a the sound of a in father, n that of a in fate, e that of i in machine, etc.

It is earnestly recommended that the requisitions in Latin and Greek Authors be accurately complied with ; real equivalents, however, will be accepted, as, for example, Caesar's Gallic War, Books V. and VI., in place of Sallust's Catiline ; two additional orations of Cicero in place of the Cato Major; the seventh book of the Aeneid in place of the Eclogues ; the last five books of the Aeneid in place of Ovid.

Candidates who enter College on Course II. substitute elective studies, amounting to four exercises a week, either in Mathematics or in some other subject, for the Mathematics of the Freshman year.

No partial substitutions or interchanges between Courses I. and II. will be allowed, but candidates can present themselves on both courses, or on one course with additional subjects belonging to the other.

PRELIMINARY EXAMINATION.

Candidates for admission to the Freshman Class are allowed to divide the examination into two examinations separated by an interval of not less than an academic year. No candidate, however, will be admitted to examination on a part of any subject, and no account will be made of, nor certificate be given for, the preliminary examination, unless the candidate has passed satisfactorily in at least five subjects.

OPTIONAL EXAMINATIONS.

The optional examinations will be held at the time of the examinations for admission in September ; those in Mathematics will also be held at the admission examinations in June.

A principal aim in providing these examinations is to encourage teachers to carry the studies of their brighter and more diligent pupils beyond the bare requisitions for admission, in whatever direction taste or opportunity may suggest. Full employment may thus be secured for most capable student until he is thought mature enough to enter College, while his greater progress in school will make his College course more profitable by enabling him to take up his studies at a more advanced stage, or to give more time to the studies of his choice. It will be seen that a student may anticipate the whole work of the Freshman year, and still remain four years in College.

а

THE CLASSICS.

Candidates who present themselves upon Course I. may offer themselves for examination upon one or both of the following classical

courses:

(1) Latin. Livy, two books. Horace, Odes and Epodes.

The translation at sight of a passage from the philosophical works of Cicero.

The retranslation of the English of a similar passage into Latin.

a

(2) Greek. Plato, Apology and Crito. Homer, Iliad, Books IV.-VIII., or Odyssey, Books IV., IX.-XII. Euripides, Alcestis ; or Homer, Odyssey, Books V.-VII. The translation at sight of a passage from Xenophon. Translation from English into Greek.

Candidates who pass with credit these examinations in addition to the classical examinations of Course I. above will be placed in advanced sections in Latin or Greek, or in elective sections in Latin or Greek, or in other subjects, at their option, in place of the Freshman studies thus anticipated. All those who hope to attain distinction in classical studies are strongly advised to pass these examinations on entering, with the view of taking advanced courses in the Classics.

MATHEMATICS.

Candidates who present themselves upon Course I. are at liberty to offer themselves for examination also upon subjects 7, 9, and 10, of Course II. ; and, upon passing such examination with credit, they will be adınitted to an advanced section in Mathematics.

Candidates who anticipate all the Freshman Mathematics will be allowed to take elective studies in their place.

Candidates who desire to attain special distinction in Mathematics or Physics are advised to present themselves upon the advanced Mathematical subjects of Course II. in addition to the requisitions of Course I.

PHYSICS.

Candidates who pass a satisfactory examination at admission upon the course in Physics of the Freshman year may substitute for that course an elective study.

GERMAN.

Candidates for admission who present French may offer themselves for examination also in German Grammar and the translation of simple German prose ; upon passing such examination with credit they will be allowed to substitute some elective course or courses in place of the Freshman course in German.

PRESCRIBED STUDIES OF THE SOPHOMORE AND JUNIOR YEARS,

Candidates for admission to the Freshman Class who are prepared to pass a creditable examination upon any of the prescribed studies of the Sophomore and Junior years may pass such examination at the beginning of the Freshman Year, instead of at the beginning of the year in which the study is pursued, and thereby relieve themselves from attendance at the exercises in that study in College.

ADVANCED STANDING. Candidates may be admitted to advanced standing as late as the beginning of the Senior year, provided they present themselves for examination as directed below. The candidate for admission to advanced standing must appear on examination to be well versed in the following studies :

[ocr errors]

1. In the studies required for admission to the Freshman Class.

2. In all the required studies already pursued by the class for which he is offered ; and in as many elective studies as he would have pursued if he had entered at the beginning of the course.

All candidates for admission to advanced standing must be examined either in June or in September, at the times of the regular examinations for admission to the Freshman Class, and in conformity with the following rules :

1. All candidates for admission to advanced standing must first be examined for admission to the Freshman Class ; for this examination and also for examination on the studies of the Freshman year, they may offer themselves either in June or in September.

2. The examination on the studies of the Sophomore and Junior years is held only in September, at the time of the regular examination for admission to the Freshman Class.

In the case of graduates of other colleges who seek admission to Harvard College, the examination will be directed to ascertaining from their acquired powers and attainments their fitness to join the class for which they offer themselves, a minute acquaintance with all the ground they have previously gone over not being essential. Such candidates should bring evidence of their standing at the colleges where they received their degree.

TIMES OF EXAMINATION.

Two regular examinations for admission to the Freshman Class are held each year, one at the beginning of the summer vacation, and the other at the beginning of the academic year in the autumn.

In 1877 the first examination will take place on Thursday, Friday, and Saturday, June 28, 29, and 30 ; and the second examination on Thursday, Friday, and Saturday, September 27, 28, and 29. examination will begin at precisely 8 o'clock, A. M., on Thursday. The candidates will assemble in Harvard Hall. Attendance on the three days is required.

The first examination will be held also in Cincinnati ; and candidates who desire to be examined there must send their names to the Secretary before June 15. Persons not intending to enter College

« AnteriorContinuar »