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VI.

I. Let us consider,1 first,2 whether the universe3 is governed 4 by the foresight6 of the gods;6 secondly,7 whether they provide 8 for the welfare 9 of man.10

1. Video. 2. Primum. 3. Mundus. 4. Bego. 5. Providentia. 6. Deus. 7. Deinde. 8. Consulo. 9. Res. 10. Humanus.

2. Neoptolemus would never1 have been able 2 to take 3 Troy, if he had been willing 4 to listen 6 to Lycomedes, in 6 whose household he had been brought7 up.

1. Nunguam. 2. Possum. 3. Capere. 4. Volo. 5. Audio. 6. Apud. 7. Educo.

3. When 1 the enemy2 saw8 that the damages,4 which they had hoped 5 could 6 not be repaired 7 for a long8 time,9 had been so10 repaired by the toil11 of a few12 days13 that there was no opportunity14 left15 for a sally,16 they wereeager17 for the original18 terms19 of capitulation.20

1. Ubi. 2. Hostis. 3. Video. 4. Is. 5. Spero.

6. Possum. 7. Peficio. 8. Longus. 9. Spatium. 10. Ita.

11. Labor. 12. Pawns. 13. Dies. 14. Locus. 15. Re

linquo. 16. LJruptio. 17. Becurro. 18. Idem. 19. Coraditio. 20. Leditio.

4. If he is about to come1 to Rome without2 violence,2 you may 3 properly 4 remain 5 at home;6 but7 if he is about to give8 up the city 9 to be plundered,10 I fear11 that Dolabella himself12 can13 not fully14 protect15 us.

1. Venio. 2. Modeste. 3. Possum. 4. Becte. 5. Sum.

6. Domus. 7. Sin. 8. Do. 9. Urbs. 10. Diripio.

11. Fctw. 12. ipse. 13. Possum. bl. .Sa&s. 15. Prosum.

VII.

1. When1I was on 2 (my) Tusculan-estate,3 and wanted 4 to use5 certain6 books7 out8 of the library9 of Lucullus, I went10 to his villa,11 to take12 them thence13 myself,14 as16 I used16 to.

1. Cum. 2. In. 3. Tusculanum. 4. Fella 5. JJti. 6. Quidam. 7. Liber. 8. E. 9. Bibliotheca. 10. Venire. 11. Villa. 12. Promere. 13. Inde. 14. Ipse. 15. Ut. 16. SoZere.

2. You know-not,1 madman 2 what power 8 virtue 4 has;5 you use 6 the name7 only8 of virtue, you know not how 9 powerful10 virtue itself11 is.

1. Nescire. 2. Insanus. 3. Vis. 4. Virtus. 5. Habere. 6. Usurpare. 7. Nomen. 8. Tantum. 9. #m<2. IO. Tq be powerful, valere. ll. Tpse.

3. What can1 you say2 in8 your defence4 which they have not said?

1. Possum. 2. Dicere. 3. /re. 4. De/ensio.

4. You are sorry1 for others,2 for yourself8 you are neither 4 sorry nor 4 ashamed.5

1. Miseret. 2. Alias. 3. Tu, 4. Area 5. Pudet.

5. The tyrant1 Dionysius, expelled2 from Syracuse,8 taught4 boys5 at Corinth.6

1. Tyrannus. 2. Pxpello. 3. Syracusce,-arum. 4. Docere. 5. Pw£7\ 6. Corinthus.

6. This state1 has not produced2 any3 men more illustrious 4 in glory 5 than Africanus, Laelius, and Furius.

1. Civitas. 2. Ferre. 3. Ullus. 4. Clarus. 5. Gloria. VIII.

1. Let us so1 live2 as always8 to think' that an account 5 must be rendered 8 by us.

1. Ita. 2. Vivere. 3. Semper. 4. Arbitrari. 5. Ratio. 6. Reddere.

2. Would-that1I could 2 as 3 easily 4 discover 6 the truth6 aa refute7 the falsehood.8

1. Utinam. 2. Posse. 3. Tam. 4. Facile. 5. Invenire. 6. Ferns. 7. Convincere. 8. Falsus.

3. He exhorted1 his friends 2 not to be-wanting 8 to the common4 safety.5

1. Hortari. 2. Amicus. 3. Deesse. 4. Communis. 5. Salus.

4. After1 Pompey had learned 2 what had been done 8 at Corfinium, he set-out4 with two legions 6 from Luceria, and in five days6 arrived-at7 Brundisium.

1. Posteaquam. 2. Reperire. 3. Gerere. 4. Proficisci. 5. Legio. 6. Dies. 7. Pervenire.

5. When1 by the supreme-authority 2 of one man therewas8 no-longer4 a field6 in public-life6 for wisdom7 or8 personal-influence,9 I surrendered10 myself neither11 to my sorrows,12 by which I should have been overwhelmed13 ifI-had-not14 resisted16 them, nor11 to pleasure16 unworthy17 of a scholar.18

1. Quum. 2. Donzinatus. 3. Esse. 4. Non jam. 5. Locus. 6. Bespublica. 7. Consilium. 8. Aut. 9. Auctoritas. 10. Dedere. 11. Area 12. Angor. 13. Conficere. 14. Nisi. 15. Resistere. 16. Voluptas. 17. Indignus. 18. Boctus homo.

IX.

1. I find1 that Plato came2 to Tarentum in the consulship 8 of Camillus and Claudius

1. Eeperire. 2. Venire. 3. Express this by the word consul.

2. The plays1 of2 Iivius are not worthy 3 of being read 4 a second6 time.

1. Fabula. 2. Livianus = of Livius. 3. Dignus.

4. Legere. 5. Iterum.

3. The Sicilians1 sometimes 2 make 8 a month 4 longer 6 by one 6 day7 or two8 days.

1. Siculus. 2. Nonnunquam. 3. Facere. 4. Mensis.

5. Longus. 6. Unus. 7. Dies. 8. Biduum. Write out the rule for the case of dies.

4. The Stoics1 think2 it does not8 concern4 men6 to know 6 what is going to happen.7

1. Stoicus. 2. Existimare. 3. Nihil. 4. Inter esse. 5. Homo. 6. Scire. 7. Esse.

5. There were [some1] who on this day accused2 the king 8 of rashness 4 the consul5 of inefficiency.6

1. Omit. 2. Aceusare. 3. Rex. 4. Temeritas. 5. Consul. 6. Segnitia.

6. I am afraid1 that I cannot2 grant8 that.4

1. Vereri. 2. Possum. 3. Concedere. 4. Ule.

X.

1. When Nasica had come1 to the poet2 Ennius, and the maid 8 had told 4 him6 Ennius was not at home,6 Nasica knew7 that she had said so8 at her master's9 command,10 and that he was within.11

1. Venire. 2. Porta. 3. Ancilla. 4. Dicere. 5. Is (dative). 6. Domus. 7. Sentire. 8. Omit. 9. Dominus. 10. Jussu (abl.). 11. Intus.

2. A few1 days 2 after,8 when Ennius had come to Nasica and asked4 for him, Nasica bawls5 out that he is not at home.

1. Paucus. 2. Dies. 3. Post. 4. Qucerere (with the accusative). 5. Exelamare.

3. Then quoth1 Ennius : What ?2 Do I not recognize8 your4 voice?6

1. Inquit. 2. Quid. 3. Cognoscere. 4. Tuus. 5. Vox.

4. Hereupon1 Nasica: You are a shameless 2 fellow:8 when I asked for you I believed4 your maid (when6 she said) that you were not at home. Do you not believe myown-self ?6

1. me. 2. Impudens. 3. Homo. 4. Credere (with dative). 5. Omit. 6. My-own-self, ego ipse.

XL

1. This1 edict2 having been published,8 there was4 no6 state 6 which 7 did not send8 a part9 of its10 Senate11 to Cordova,12 no6 Roman citizen18 who7 did not come14 to the meeting at16 the day.16

1. Literally, which, qui. 2. JSdictum. 3. Permdgare. 4. Esse. 5. Nullus. 6. Civitas. 7. Which — not or who —not, quin. 8. Mittere. 9. Pars. 10. Omit. 11. Senatus. 12. Corduba. 13. Civis. 14. Convenire. 15. Ad. 16. Dies.

2. Nothing1 is more praiseworthy,2 nothing more worthy3 of a great4 and illustrious6 man,6 than clemency.7

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