Memoir of William Madison Peyton, of Roanoke: Together with Some of His Speeches in the House of Delegates of Virginia, and His Letters in Reference to Secession and the Threatened Civil War in the United States, Etc., Etc

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J. Wilson, 1873 - 392 páginas

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Página 231 - What is a man, If his chief good and market of his time Be but to sleep and feed? a beast, no more. Sure he that made us with such large discourse, Looking before and after, gave us not That capability and god-like reason To fust in us unus'd.
Página 210 - But wherefore do you hold me here so long ? What is it that you would impart to me ? If it be aught toward the general good, Set honour in one eye and death i' the other, And I will look on both indifferently : For let the gods so speed me as I love The name of honour more than I fear death.
Página 9 - Better it is to be of an humble spirit with the lowly, than to divide the spoil with the proud.
Página 88 - List his discourse of war, and you shall hear A fearful battle render'd you in music : Turn him to any cause of policy, The Gordian knot of it he will unloose, Familiar as his garter...
Página 42 - I will bear my sorrows like a man, But I must also feel them as a man. I cannot but remember such things were, And were most dear to me.
Página 59 - What soul was his, when, from the naked top Of some bold headland, he beheld the sun Rise up, and bathe the world in light...
Página 244 - The whole South is in a state of revolution, into which Virginia, after a long struggle, has been drawn, and though I recognize no necessity for this state of things, and would have forborne and pleaded to the end for redress of grievances, real or supposed, yet in my own person I had to meet the question, whether I should take part against my native State.
Página 231 - How all occasions do inform against me, And spur my dull revenge ! What is a man, If his chief good and market of his time Be but to sleep and feed ? a beast, no more.
Página 89 - The Gordian knot of it he will unloose, Familiar as his garter — that, when he speaks, The air, a chartered libertine, is still, And the mute wonder lurketh in men's ears, To steal his sweet and honeyed sentences...
Página 35 - Digressions, incontestably, are the sunshine, they are the life, the soul of reading : take them out of this book, for instance, you might as well take the book along with them ; one cold eternal winter would reign in every page of it : restore them to the writer, — he steps forth like a bridegroom, — bids All hail ; brings in variety, and forbids the appetite to fail.

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