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PART I.

Page.

17

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CHAPTER I.

Select Sentences and Paragraphs.

CHAPTER II.

Narrative Pieces.

Soct. 1. No rank or possessions can make the guilly mind happy

2. Change of external condition often adverse to virtue

3. Haman; or the misery of pride

4. Lady Jane Grey

5. Ortogrul; or the vanity of riches

6. The hill of science

7. The journey of a day; a picture of human life

CHAPTER IIT.

Didactick Pieces.

Soct. 1. The importance of a good education

2. On gratitude

3. On forgiveness

4. Motives to the practice of gentleness

5. A suspicious temper the source of misery to its possessor

6. Comforts of religion

7. Diffidence of our abilities a mark of wisdom

8. On the importance of order in the distribution of our time

9. The dignity of virtue amidst corrupt examples

10. The mortifications of vice greater than those of virtue

ll. On contentment

12. Rank and riches afford no ground for envy

13. Patience under provocations our interest as well as duty

14. Moderation in our wishes recommended

15. Omniscience and omnipresence of the Deity, the source of consolation

to good men

CHAPTER IV.

Argumentative Pieces.

Soct. 1. Happiness is founded in rectitude of conduct

2 Virtue and piety man's highest interest

3. The injustice of an uncharitable spirit

4. The misfortunes of men mostly chargeable on themselves

5. On disinterested friendship

6. On the immortality of the soul

CHAPTER V.

Descriptive Pieces.

Sect. 1. The seasons.

2 The cataract of Niagara, in Canada, North America

3. The grotto of Antiparos

4. The grotto of Antiparos, continued

5. Earthquake at Catanea

6. Creation

7. Charity

8. Prosperity is redoubled to a good man

9. On the beauties of the Psalms

10. Character of Alfred, king of England

11. Charactor of Queen Elizabeth

12. The slavery of vice

13. The of integrity

14. Gentleness

CHAPTER VI.

Pathetick Pieces.

Sect. 1. Trial and execution of the Earl of Strafford

2. An eminent instance of true fortitude of mind

76

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105

Sect. 3. The good man's comfort in affliction

4. The close of life

5. Exalted society, and the renewal of virtuous connexions, two spurces

6. The clemency and amiable character of the patriarch joseph

7. Altamont .

CHAPTER VIL

Dialogues.

Sect. 1. Democritus and Heraclitus

2. Dionysius, Pythias, and Damon

3. Locke and Bayle

CHAPTER VIII.

Publick Speeches.

Sect. 1. Cicero against Verres

2 Speech of Adherbal to the Roman Senato, imploring their protectiva

against Jugurtha

3. The apostle Paul's noble defence before Festas and Agrippa
4. Lord Mansfiekl's speech in the House of Lords, 1770, on the bill for pre-

venting the delays of justice, by claiming the privilege of parliament

5. An address to young persons .

CHAPTER IX.

Promiscuous Pieces.

Sect. 1. Earthquake at Calabria, in the year 1638

2. Letter from Pliny to Germinius .

3. Letter from Pliny to Marcellinus, on the death of an amiable young

woman.

4. On discretion

5. On the government of our thoughts

6. On the evils which flow from unrestrained passions

7. On the proper state of our temper with respect to one another

8. Excellence of the Holy Scriptures

9. Reflections occasioned by a review of the blessings pronounced by Christ

on his disciples, in his sermon on the mount

10. Schemes of life often illusory

11. The pleasures of virtuous sensibility

12. On the true honour of man.

13. The influence of devotion on the happiness of life

14. The planetary and terrestrial worlds comparatively considered

15. On the power of custom, and the uses to which it inay be applied

16. The pleasures resulting from a proper use of our faculties

17. Description of candour

18. On the imperfection of that happiness which rests solely on worldly

pleasures

19. What are the real and solid enjoyments of human life

20. Scale of beings .

21. Trust in the care of Providence rocommended

22. Piety and gratitude enliven prosperity

23. Virtue, when deeply rooted, is not subject to the influence of fortune

24. The speech of Fabricius, a Roman ambassador, to king Pyrrhus ·

25. Character of James I. king of England

26. Charles V. emperor of Germany, resigns his dominions, and retires from

the world

27. The same subject continued

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163

CHAPTER II.

Narrative Pieces.

Pages

Sact. 1. The bear and the bees

148

2. The nightingale and the glow-worm

149

3. The trials of virtue

ib.

4. The youth and the philosopher

351

5. Discourse between Adam and Eve, retiring to rest

152

6. Religion and death

CHAPTER IIL.

Didactick Pieces.

Sect. 1. The vanity of wealth

156

2. Nothing formed in vain

ibi

3. On pride

157

4. Cruelty to brutes censured

ib.

5. A paraphrase on the latter part of the 6th chapter of Matthew

158

6. The death of a good man a strong incentive to virtue

. . . 159

7. Reflections on a future state, from a review of winter .

ib.

8. Adam's advice to Eve, to avoid temptation

160

9. On procrastination

161

10. That philosophy, which stops at secondary causes, reproved

162

11. Indignant sentiments on natonal prejudices and hatred; and on slavery.

CHAPTER IV.

Descriptive Pieces.

Sect. 1. The morning in summer

164

2. Rural sounds, as well as rural sights, delightful

ib.

3. The rose

165

4. Care of birds for their young

ib.

5. Liberty and slavery contrasted

166

6. Charity. A paraphrase on the 13th chapter to the First Corinthians 167

7. Picture of a good man

168

8. The pleasures of retirement .

169

9. The pleasure and benefit of an improved and well-directed imagination 170

CHAPTER V.

Pathetick Pieces.

Soct. 1. The hermit

2. The beggar's petition

172

3. Unhappy close of life

173

4. Elegy to pity

174

5. Verses supposed to be written by Alexander Selkirk, during his solitary

abodle in the Island of Juan Fernandez

in

6. Gratitude

175

7. A man perishing in the snow; from whence reflections are raised on

• the miseries of life

177

8. A morning hymn

178

CHAPTER VI.

Promiscuous Pieces.

Sect. 1. Ode to content

179

2. The shepherd and the philosopher

180

3. The road to happiness open to all men

182

4. The goodness of Providence

183

5. The Creator's works attest his greatness

ib.

6. Address to the Deity

184

7. The pursuit of happiness often ili directed

183

8. The fire-side

186

9. Providence vindicated in the present state of man

187

10. Selfishness reproved

188

11. Human frailty

189

12. Ode ta Peace

190

13. Ode to Adversity

ib.

14. The Creation required to praise its Author

191

15. The universal prayer

193

16. Conscience.

194

17. On an infant

ib.

18. The cuckoo

198

19. Day. A pastoral in three parts

ib.

20. The order of Nature

197

21. Confidence in Divine Protection

199

22. Hymn, on a review of the seasons

ib,

23. On solitude .::

201

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PART I.

PIECES IN PROSE.

CHAPTER I.

SELECT SENTENCES AND PARAGRAPHS.

SECTION I. 1. DILIGENCE, industry, and proper improvement of time, are material duties of the young.

2. The acquisition of knowledge is one of the most honourable occupations of youth,

3. Whatever useful or engaging endowments we possess, vxtue is requisite, in order to their shining with proper lustre.

4. Virtuous youth gradually brings forward accomplished and flourishing manhood.

5. Sincerity and truth form the basis of every virtue. 6. Disappointments and distress are often blessings in disguise. 7. Change and alteration form the very essence of the world.

8. True happiness is of a retired nature, and an enemy to pomp and noisc.

9. In order to acquire a capacity for happiness, it must be our first study to rectify inward disorders.

10. Whatever purifies, fortifies also the heart. 11. From our eagerness to grasp, we strangle and destroy plea

12. A temperate spirit, and moderate expectations, are excel. lent safeguards of the mind, in this uncertain and changing state.

13. There is nothing, except simplicity of intention, and purity of principle, that can stand the test of near approach and strict examination.

14. The value of any possession is to be chiefly estimated, by the relief which it can bring us in the time of our greatest need.

15. No person who has once yielded up the government of his mind, and given loose rein to his desires and passions, can tell how far they may carry him.

16. Tranquillity of mind is always most likely to be attained, when the business of the world is tempered with thoughtful and serious retreat.

17. He who would act like a wise man, and build his house on the rock, and not on the sand, should contemplate human life, not only in the sunshine, but in the shade.

sure.

NOTE.

In the first chapter, the compiler has exhibited sentences in a great variety of con. struction, and in all the diversity of punctuation. If well practised upon, he presumes they will fully prepare the young reader for the various pauses, inflections, and modulations of voice, which the succeeding pieces require. The Author's “ English Exercises," under the head of Punctuation, will afford the learner additional scope for improving himself in reading sentences and paragraphs variously constructed.

18. Let usefulness and beneficence, not ostentation and vanity, direct the train of your pursuits.

19. To maintain a steady and unbroken mind, amidst all the shocks of the world, marks a great and noble spirit.

20. Patience, by preserving composure within, resists the impression which trouble makes from without.

21. Compassionate affections, even when they draw tears from our eyes for human misery, convey satisfaction to the heart.

22. They who have nothing to give, can often afford relief to others, by imparting what they feel.

23, Our ignorance of what is to come, and of what is really good or evil, should correct anxiety about wordly success.

24. The veil which covers from our sight the events of succeeding years, is a veil woven by the hand of mercy.

25. The best preparation for all the uncertainties of futurity, consists in a well-ordered mind, a good conscience, and a cheerful submission to the will of Heaven,

SECTION II. 1. The chief misfortunes that befall us in life, can be traced to some vices or follies which we have committed.

2. Were we to survey the chambers of sickness and distress, we should often find them peopled with the victims of intemperance and sensuality, and with the children of vicious indolence and sloth.

3. To be wise in our own eyes, to be wise in the opinion of the world, and to be wise in the sight of our Creator, are three things so very different, as rarely to coincide.

4. Man, in his highest earthly glory, is but a reed floating on the stream of time, and forced to follow every new direction of the current.

5. The corrupted temper, and the guilty passions of the bad, frustrate the effect ofevery advantage which the world confers on them.

6. The external misfortunes of life, disappointments, poverty, and sickness, are light in comparison of those inward distresses of mind, occasioneď by folly, by passion, and by guilt.

7. No station is so high, no power so great, no character so unblemished, as to exempt men from the attacks of rashness, malice, or envy.

8. Moral and religious instruction derives its efficacy, not so much from what men are taught to know, as from what they are brought to feel.

9. He who pretends to great sensibility towards men, and yet has no feeling for the high objects of religion, no heart to admire and adore the great Father of the universe, has reason to distrust the truth and delicacy of his sensibility.

10. When, upon rational and sober inquiry, we have established our principles, let us not suffer them to be shaken by the scoffs of the licentious, or the cavils of the sceptical.

11. When we observe any tendency to treat religion or morals with disrespect and levity, let us hold it to be a sure indication of a perverted understanding, or a depraved heart.

12. Every degree of guilt incurred by yielding to temptation, tends to debase the mind, and to weaken the generous and benevolent principles of human nature.

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