Imágenes de páginas
PDF
EPUB
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

LECTURE XVII.

Pag

THE PRE-EMINENT CHARACTER AND CON.

DUCT OF OUR LORD.--Mark vii. 37.

8

Claims of CHRIST

87

The conduct of our Lord in his more peculiar character

as MEDIATOR

90

The manner in which he sustained his high claims of

being the Son of God and the Saviour of the world 90

His conduct as a Teacher and Revealer of the will of

God

92

His manner of instruction

93

The matter of his instruction

94

The manner in which our Lord supported the state of

humiliation

96

The heavenly reward that he promised to his disciples 98

The conduct of our Lord as THE EXAMPLE OF HUMAN

100

His piety and devotion to his heavenly Father

100

His benevolence and compassion towards man

101

His meekness and lowliness of spirit

103

His superiority to the world

103

His strict temperance and command of the inferior ap-

petites

104

His fortitude and constancy

104

His prudence and discretion

105

The Union of separate graces

106

His virtues were unalloyed with the kindred failings 106

The opposite, and to us apparently contradictory, graces

were found in him in equal proportion

106

All was carried to the greatest height, and continued in

107

A peculiar harmony

108

The character of our LORD AS THE FOUNDER OF THE

CHRISTIAN RELIGION

108

Its suitableness to the necessities of man

108

The surprising novelty and sublimity of our Saviour's

character

110

The different parts of our Lord's character correspond

with bis undertaking

111

The impression and effect of the whole public character

of CHRIST

113

The manner in which it is given by the Evangelists 113

This argument springs from a FAIR PRESUMPTIon upon

the first statement of the case

116

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

.

.

O

[merged small][ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors][ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

LECTURE XXIV.

THE SOUND INTERPRETATION OF THE RE.

CORDS OF REVELATION.-2 TIMOTHY ii, 15. 330

A right method of interpreting Scripture, SPRINGS DI-

RECTLY FROM A TRUE FAITH. For such a faith

331

Implies an honest application of our understanding to

the Scriptures

331

Includes a willingness to submit our understanding and

heart to all the truths which God is pleased to reveal 332

Puts us in possession of many of the blessings of which

the Scriptures treat

333

Leads us to seek the assistance of God's blessed Spirit in

rightly understanding the Scriptures

335

Guards us against the danger of hazardous interpreta-

tions, or a false use of difficult passages

335

And disposes us to resort to all necessary helps

336

COMMON SENSE and the ORDINARY LAWS of human lan-

guage aid the right interpretation

3.37

The simplest sense is generally the true one

339

The occasion of the book being written should be con-

sulted

339

Let brief passages be explained by those that are more

full on the same or kindred subjects

340

Figurative and poetical parts should be interpreted by

the fixed and ordinary laws which are constantly ap-

plied to such language in common life

341

We should suspend our judgment where, after all, a pas-

sage is not obvious

343

The great scope and analogy of truth will either solve all

material difficulties, or render them practically useful 344

The rules SUGGESTED by that particular character of in-

SPIRATION which belongs to the Bible

345

We should rise to the sublimity of the Scripture mys-

teries

345

We must give to the last portion of Revelation that

weight which it may justly claim

346

What is temporary, local, and extraordinary, must not be

allowed to hide the lustre of what is permanent and

uniform

347

« AnteriorContinuar »