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1697.)
On Scriptural and Chinese Chronology.

123 been able to ascertain, but take it to a party to the settlement. From this bare been Corbet, from the circum- Thomas and Frances, the pedigree prostance of Sir Thomas Corbet being also ceeds as follows: Thomas Kempe, of Thwaite, buried there Frances (supposed Corbet), buried April 3, 1668.

at Ely, 1691. Clement Kempe, Hobart, died Rev.Robt. Kemp, Penelope, dau. of Elizabeth. eldest son, buried at Bombay, of Streatham, Isle | Sir Francis Dun- Frances, nar. the at Thwaite, Oct. unm. 1689. of Ely, buried combe, ht. buried Rev. Thos. Ben19, 1674. T Thomas,died there May 17, atStreatham, Feb. yon, of Ely; and

young
1695.
13, 1695.

2dly, — Bolton. Frances, dau. and heires, mar. Rev. Duncombe Kemp, of London, Penelope, Abraham Clerke, of Seething, co. Apothecary, died unmarried,

born Norfolk, and had issue. +

1726, buried at Streatham.

1692. I am inclined to think that Eliza. Clement Kempe. Perhaps some of beth, the daughter of Thomas Kempe your Correspondents may be able to abovenamed, married the Mr. Horne throw light upon this point. or Hearne, who purchasedThwayte of Yours, &c.

S. D.

way to

Mr. Urbax,

Feb. 14. the Earth? which beginning of time, LTHOUGH wholly incompe- by the aid of recorded ages of the AnA. H.'s chronological calculations, compute. If we will lay aside fanciful there are in his communication of last theories, and perplexing subtleties, we month, some unguarded expressions, may surely reconcile in our minds the which, as they appear to me in some truih of the sacred narrative, with the degree to call in question the Divine main facts of our own and of profane inspiration of the Scriptures, I cannot history. Once more, in speaking of pass without animadversion. In the the Tower of Babel, A. H. designates first place, if we are to understand by it as a " land-mark” by which the the term prophecy the announcement simple - hearted inhabitants of that (whether expressly or metaphorically) golden age might know which of future events, which could not be return home! “a motive,” he adds, otherwise known than by a Divine in- for the building of it, “ far more innospiration, and which we know has cent than that ascribed by Moses." never flowed but in one authorized But how can any one even attempt to channel, and of which the Scriptures prove the innocence of the undertaking, are the only authentic record, why without, at the same time, charging does A.H. in the same sentence, speak God foolishly? The attempt, in His of the prophelical language of Scrip- judgment, was of that nature, as to deture, and of the prophelical books of mand an iminediate and perpetual rethe Chinese ? thus, seeming to class buke. If the building were founded the wisdom, probably the fraud, of on an innocent or useful intent, or man, with the wisdom of God. Let even but on a mistaken judgment, them be designated by a characteristic either God took unjust vengeance, or appellation or a distinctive epithet, Moses has written from traditional prethey cannot both be prophetical in the judice, and was not one of the “ holy same sense ; the difference, therefore, men of old, who spake as they were should be accurately marked.

moved by the Holy Ghost." Again, he speaks of the Delugeas Not in this age only, but in all, an æra to which all Nations have there are too many who are glad to reckoned up;" and adds, “ that if all lay hold of any such loose expression were content to remain there, we should which tends to invalidate the Scripall be satisfied of the truth of our own, tures, and to lower them to the level of and of profane, and Sacred history." uninspired writings; a mischief which Does d' H. include, in this censure, cannot be too carefully guarded against, Moses, or rather God, who by the pen nor 100 sedulously counteracted : for to of Moses, has declared that " In the render them profitable for doctrine, for beginning He created the Heavens and correction, for instruction in righteous.

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Architectural Improvements in Westminster.

(Feb. ness, it must be laid down as an 'invio- lace it has been gradually retrograding, lable principle, that all Scripture is till, it has arrived at the lowest state of given by inspiration of God ; question degradation. Gwynne, in his “Lonthe probability of hut one recorded fuck, don and Westminster Improved,” a and you weaken the hold of every doc- book I have had occasion to notice betrine and precept.-On their Divine fore in my correspondence upon the inspiration, as on the moving principle Improvements of Westminster, menof some powerful engine, depends all tioned the encroachments which were their influence and authority over the then making on the beauty of this spot consciences and lives of men. Y.D.

-a spot as he justly remarks, which ought to be held sacred-with proper

severity and due warmth ; and sugMr. URBAN, Westminster, Feb. 5.

gested many alterations for its improveT is gratifying to find that the spi- ment.

There is a point to which all things coine extinct; and that those who have

must arrive before a change can be efthe power have also the inclination to fected. Our Park had arrived at this contribute to the increase of the comfort point; and is now undergoing some alof the citizens of this overgrown Me- ierations for the better. My expectatropolis, by a better arrangement of the tions that these would be preludes to parts and consequent increase of effect greater exertions are, I perceive, with and beauty to the whole. This spirit no small degree of pleasure upon the -more especially observable in the designs for altering the neighbourhood of

of

been at last decided that a terrace is to The two Houses of Legislature must be erected along the south side of the give great satisfaction to the public- park to James-street, Buckinghamespecially to those whom convenience

gate, lo accord with the alterations or choice may have induced to fix their

now in progress on the site of Carlton residences here—and must be produc- Palace. tive of inuch that is good. The design

This plan, which must have struck which the Board of Works has agreed very forcibly the minds of those who to adopt, as it tends considerably to re

have given the subject a moment's constore io a healthy stale a part of the sideration as the only one calculated present diseased - Lungs of London"

to produce grandeur and beauty,—was I will be of the greatest utility, and af- believe, first promulgated in a wellford the most unequivocal delight. For written pamphlet, entitled “Considesome years past the royal Park of St. rations on the expediency of building a James's has been suffered to exist in a Metropolitan Palace.” The author, very deplorable condition-inconveni

whoever it may be—and I have heard ent to ihe visitors, and disgraceful to

it attributed to a gentleman whose plan the country-vithout any, or scarcely for the comfort of the citizens has been any efforts being made towards the unrequited, though deserving of the amelioration of the one, and conse- highest praise and attention-displays quent annibilation of the other. The great taste and feeling in his remarks. formal arrangement of pleasure grounds He says: in the time of the gaiety - inspiring

" What can be more triste than St. Charles; or the no less cold distribu

James's Park? tion of landscape in the beginning of

A filthy dark wall extends the 18th century, would be far prefer- a miserable grove imperfectly concealing

from Spring-gardens to the Stable-yard * ; able to its present appearance. In the

another dead wall, cramps the view of Conformer period there was something in stitution-hill; the Bird Cage-walk affords this promenade, whereon the eye might the united pleasure of a barrack-yard and rest with some feelings bordering upon of Tothill Fields. Compare with these the satisfaction and pleasure; but since it gay promenades of Paris; gardens much has ceased to be ihe gardens of the Pa- more confined in space, but as the French,

This I presume will be removed in the alterations now in progress upon the site of Carlton House. Here I may be allowed to remark that the demolition of this regal pile is rapidly proceeding : the screen—which had the merit of hiding the beautiful portico-is nearly taken away; and the east end of the edifice is rapidly falling under the destroying utensils of the builder. The beautifully diversified garden has been all torn up, and the naked wall of the house, destitute of ornament, has been laid open to our view, with the two Gothic cloisters—alt. -rether presenting a dreary prospect, calculated to excite the reflections of the

and so

Tenor estate.

1927.] Architectural Improvements in Westminster.

125 bien entretenus receive from their decora. It becomes a question of a twig when it tion, and from the free circulation of light ought to be a question of a tree, and they and air, a gaiety of appearance which is in prune where they ought to eradicate. In itself a real recreation."

such cases a storm is the only remedy; it The reason assigned for this superi- often does what the hatchet should have done ority of French pleasure-gardens' has long before, and the proprietor is surprised

at the improvement." been very tastily clothed by the Muse in the following lines :

It will be necessary, when this plan The French have taste in all they do,

is put in execution, to form a road runWhich we are quite without;

ning, parallel with the park, which For Nature, which to them gave goût,

should be the only carriage-way to the To us gave only gout!

new houses, no vehicles whatever being But I am digressing too much. It road would then forin ali admirable

permitted within the park gates. This will therefore he necessary to return to the line of houses running from those the want of which is at present so

carriage communication with Chelsea now existing on the south side of deservedly complained of—and be a Princes-court to Queen-square, great convenience to the west end of continued to the aforesaid James-street. One continued terrace would be far of houses* now erecting on the Gros

the town, and particularly to the world from handsome, owing to its extent: they might therefore be disposed in

Respecting the new distribution of the convenient groups, to accommodate the various entrances to and from the ground within the park I am unao. city; the facade of each group to pos- that any new arrangement is intended,

quainted : indeed I have not even heard sess different architectural features, simi- though no doubt can be entertained as Jar to the Pallazini, as Lord Farnborough to its desirableness. Gwynne in his plan very appropriately designates them, in the Regent's Park. To each group might and walks which, however agreeable

laid down a new disposition of the trees beallotted a small portion of ground, to

to the geometrically-cut taste of his be adorned with a very low shrubbery, time, would ill accord with modern or laid out in parterres of Aowers. To

notions of effect in scenery. Among prevent the architectural character of

the most conspicuous alterations were the façades frein being hidden; and to

the filling up the canal, and the erecgive the parks an air of gaiety—which

tion of an equestrian statue or group nobody can say they now possess,—the

of figures in the centre of the parade. planting of large or forest trees should

The former, I by no means approve be absolutely prohibited. The injudi- of; for, though the canal is devoid of cious permission of this in the gardens

all beauty, it might yet be made to attached to the houses in Arlington, street, has been justly censured by Lord ing scenery at

blend harmoniously with the surround

a very trifing exFarnborough in his able painphlet upon pence. A'mere naked parallel "sheet the Iinprovement of Westminster. As of water has a cold white glare, and is this pamphlet has not been so generally the more disgusting as it reminds one circulated as its merits demand, I shall of its difference from the beautiful quote one passage bearing on the point. lines of a meandering river. Price hu

There are many places and gardens mourously says it may be made of linen; which have lost all their cheerful character for nothing can be more like than a from their possessors having suffered their sheet of water and a real sheet. trees to overgrow the original intention of

An appropriate subject for the latter the plantation. Perhaps the spot when first has been suggested by your valued Corplanted was cold and naked, but nature clothes rapidly, though imperceptibly, and that respondent Col. Macdonald in p. 3.

That it may be carried into effect must which was once open and exposed, has become close and gloomy. Most people have

be the hearty wish of every admirer of the inclination to plant, but few have the

those feelings which swayed the pubcourage to cut down; when all view is shut lic conduct of his Royal Highness, out, and they feel the necessity of making and made him the beloved and rean opening, they do it with a timid hand. spected friend of the army—the steady

The houses in the squares erecting on this extensive property have a most magnificent pathway before them, paved with stones of such a length as to serve also for the roof of the vaults. This plan of paving has two advantages, seldom or ever blended, economy and effect.

124
Architectural Improvements in Westminster.

(Feb. ness, it must be laid down as an 'invio- lace it has been gradually retrograding, lable principle, that all Scripture is till, it has arrived at the lowest state of given by inspiration of God ; question degradation. Gwynne, in his “ Lon. the probability of but one recorded fuci, don and Westminster Improved,” a and you weaken the hold of every doc- book I have had occasion to notice betrine and precept.-On their Divine fore in my correspondence upon the inspiration, as on the moving principle Improvements of Westminster, menof some powerful engine, depends all tioned the encroachments which were their influence and authority over the then making on the beauty of this spot consciences and lives of men. Y.D. -a spot as he justly remarks, which

oughi to be held sacred-with proper

severity and due warmth ; and sugMr. URBAN, Westminster, Feb. 5.

gested many alterations for its improveI inclina

rit of improvement has not yet be- There is a point to which all things coine extinct; and that those who have

must arrive before a change can be efthe power have also the inclination to fected. Our Park had arrived at this contribute to the increase of the comfort point; and is now undergoing some alof the citizens of this overgrown Me- ierations for the better. My expectatropolis," by a better arrangement of the tions that these would be preludes to parts

and consequent increase of effect greater exertions are, I perceive, with and beauty to the whole. This spirit no small degree of pleasure upon the -more especially observable in the de

point of being confirmed: it having signs for altering the neighbourhood of been at last decided that a terrace is to The two Houses of Legislature-must be erected along the south side of the give great satisfaction to the public

park to James - street, Buckinghamespecially to those whom convenience

gate, to accord with the alterations or choice may have induced to fix their

now in progress on the site of Carlton residences here and must be produc- Palace. tive of inuch that is good. The design

This plan, which must have struck which the Board of Works has agreed

very sorcibly the minds of those who to adopt, as it tends considerably io re

have given the subject a moment's constore io a healthy stale a part of the sideration as the only one calculated present diseased “Lungs of London"

to produce grandeur and beauty,-was I will be of the greatest utility, and af- believe, first promulgated in a wellford the most unequivocal delight. For written pamphlet, entitled “Considesome years past the royal Park of St. rations on the expediency of building a James's has been suffered to exist in a Metropolitan Palace.” The author,very deplorable condition-inconveni- whoever it may be and I have heard ent to ihe visitors, and disgraceful to

it attributed to a gentleman whose plan the country-vithout any, or scarcely for the comfort of the citizens has been any efforts being made towards the unrequited, though deserving of the amelioration of the one, and conse- highest praise and attention--displays quent annibilation of the other. The great taste and feeling in his remarks. forinal arrangement of pleasure grounds He says: in the time of the gaiety - inspiring

« What can be more triste than St. Charles; or the no less cold distribu

James's tion of landscape in the beginning of from Spring-gardens to the Stable-yard * ;

's Park A filthy dark wall extends the 18th century, would be far prefer- a miserable grove imperfectly concealing able to its present appearance. In the another dead wall, cramps the view of Conformer period there was something in stitution-hill; the Bird Cage-walk affords this promenade, whereon the eye might the united pleasure of a barrack-yard and rest with some feelings bordering upon of Tothill Fields. Compare with these the satisfaction and pleasure; but since it gay promenades of Paris; gardens much has ceased 10 be the gardens of the Pa- more confined in space, but as the French,

* This I presume will be removed in the alterations now in progress upon the site of Carlton House. Here I may be allowed to remark that the demolition of this regal pile is rapidly proceeding : the screen—which had the merit of hiding the beautiful portico-is nearly taken away; and the east end of the edifice is rapidly falling under the destroying utensils of the builder. The beautifully diversified garden has been all torn up, and the naked wall of the house, destitute of ornament, has been laid open to our view, with the two Gothic cloisters-altogether presenting a dreary prospect, calculated to excite the

lections of the moralist.

Tenor estate.

1927.] Architectural Improvements in Westminster. :

125 lien eatretenus receive from their decora- It becomes a question of a twig when it tion, and from the free circulation of light ought to be a question of a tree, and they and air, a gaiety of appearance which is in prune where they ought to eradicate. In itself a real recreation.

such cases a storm is the only remedy; it The reason assigned for this superi- often does what the hatchet should have done ority of French pleasure-gardens' has long before, and the proprietor is surprised been very tasting clothed by the Muse

at the improvement.' in the following lines:

It will be necessary, when this plan The French have taste in all they do,

is put in execution, to form a road runWhich we are quite without;

ning, parallel with the park, which For Nature, which to them gave goût,

should be the only carriage-way to the To us gave only gout !

new houses, no vehicles whatever being But I am digressing too much. It permitted within the park gates. This

road would then forin an admirable will therefore be necessary to return to the line of houses running from those carriage communication with Chelsea

the want of which is at present so now existing on the south side of Princes-court to Queen-square, and so

deservedly complained of and be a continued to the aforesaid James-street.

great convenience to the west end of

the town, and particularly to the world One continued terrace would be far

of houses from handsome, owing to its extent:

now erecting on the Grosthey might therefore be disposed in

Respecting the new distribution of the convenient groups, to accommodate the various entrances to and from the ground within the park I am unao city; the facade of each group to pos- that any new arrangement is intended,

quainted : indeed I have not even heard sess different architectural features, simi- though no doubt can be entertained as lar to the Pallazini, as Lord Farnborough to its desirableness. Gwynne in his plan very appropriately designates them, in the Regent's Park. To each group might and walks which, however agreeable

laid down a new disposition of the trees beallotted a small portion of ground, to be adorned with a very low shrubbery,

to the geometrically-cut taste of his of laid out in parterres of flowers. To notions of effect in scenery.. Among

time, would ill accord with modern prevent the architectural character of the most conspicuous alterations were the façades from being hidden; and to the filling up the canal, and the erecgive the parks an air of gaiely—which

tion of an equestrian statue or group nobody can say they now possess,--the

of figures in the centre of the parade. planting of large or forest trees should

The former, I by no means approve be absolutely prohibited. The injudi

of; for, though the canal is devoid of cious permission of this in the gardens

all beauty, it might yet be made to attached to the houses in Arlington.

blend harmoniously with the surroundstreet, has been justly censured by Lord

ing scenery at Farnborough in his able painphlet upon pence. A mere naked parallel sheet

a very trifling exthe Improvement of Westminster. As of water has a cold white glare, and is this pamphlet has not been so generally the more disgusting as it reminds one circulated as its merits demand, I shall of its difference from the beautiful quote one passage bearing on the point. lines of a meandering river. Price hu

“There are many places and gardens mourously says it may be made of linen; which have lost all their cheerful character for nothing can be more like than a from their possessors having suffered their sheet of water and a real sheet. trees to overgrow the original intention of the plantation. Perhaps the spot when first has been suggested by your valued Cor

An appropriate subject for the latter planted was cold and naked, but nature clothes rapidly, though imperceptibly, and that respondent Col. Macdonald in p. 3.

That it which was once open and exposed, has be

may

be carried into effect must come close and gloomy. Most people have

be the hearty wish of every admirer of the inclination to lant, but few tiave the

those feelings which swayed the pubcourage to cut down; when all view is shut lic conduct of his Royal Highness, out, and they feel the necessity of making and made him the beloved and rean opening, they do it with a timid hand. spected friend of the army—the steady

The houses in the squares erecting on this extensive property have a most magnificent pathway before them, paved with stones of such a length as to serve also for the roof of the vaults. This plan of paving has two advantages, seldom or ever blended, economy and effect.

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