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tion, and in agony he cried out, whilst he rolled himself on until I had them all silently listening to me, about thirty or bis bed, like one distracted, “0 God! O my Lord! what

thirty-five in number, and they bore with me while I spoke shall I do?" But it was evident that his convictions were to them npwards of an hour, during which time many tears something like those of Simon Magus. He was afraid, were slied, and ihe house, which a short time ago had rebut had no sense whatever of the greatness of his sins. He sounded with loose and wordly conversation, was changed even sent for me twice, and on those occasions he manifes. into what it ought to have been, a “house of mourning." ted a strong desire that I should pray by him, and showed Every thing was as silent as the grave except now and a disposition to listen to the word of God; but such feel. then disturbed by the groans of those wbo were convinced ings were only momentary: the Evil Spirit seemed to have

of their folly in having designed to turn that hour to the supreme power over him, and infidelity lay at the root service of Satan which they ought to have been devoting to of his heart!

the glory of God. He had not given me any reason to suppose that he was Before I left the house every one present promisan infidel. I discovered it from the following circumstance, ed that instead of spending the day as they intended, they which occurred during my last visit to him-his last day would take the Bible, and read verse by verse those chap. upon earth.

tors I pointed out to them, wbich I pray the Lord may bless He appeared more attentive this day than usual to what to their souls. I said, and having talked to him for some time on the ne. cessity of believing in the atonement made by Jesus on

An Hour spent at Newgate Calvary; and perceiving that he seemed affected with what I had advanced, I asked him if I should pray by him, to “I HAD more thau once enjoyed the sweet yet sad privi. which he replied, “ If you please.” Wben 1 arose from lege of visiting Newgate, and being present when Mrs. my knees he cried out, seemingly with great concern and Fry, and the ladies who form her committee, and attend bitterness of soul, “ O Lord ! how shall I overcome the dif. there in order to give religious instructions, to the wretched ficulty which is in my way to believe in svch a manner that ! inmates of the prison, every Friday at eleven o'clock. I might be saved ?" I asked him what that difficulty was; Sometimes, by the desire of the ladies, I had myself ad. on wbich he looked very wild, and hesitated. I then said, dressed a few words of comfort and encouragement to the Do you believe the Bible to be the word of God? At this unhappy victims assembled there. he looked at me in such a manner as I shall never forget, “ Wishing to afford my wife, and a friend of hers, the and shaking his head, he made an effort to sum up all his gratification of witnessing one of these interesting meetremaining strength, and then cried out, as if in despair, ings, and of hearing and seeing Mrs. Fry, I conducted “ No! No! not all of it!" This effort caused his pain to them to Newgate. The heavy gates were opened to us, return, and they were of so violent a nature that the shrieks and we were the first to arrive in the upper apartment, which they drew forth from him were most alarming to the which is a kind of sanctuary in that abode of misery. neighbours, and almost overpowering in their effect too Soon, however, so considerable a concourse of persons had upon those who were in the room with bim.

assembled that we could not but think that some extraSucb was the case every fifteen or twenty minutes, and ordinary circumstance had brought them together. I yet the moment those pains ceased he would (in my ab found that a vessel of convicts was to sail in two days for sence) ask for a Newspaper. I have been told by his piece, New South Wales, and that it was to bear away eighty a pious woman, who attended on him, that on the preced. of those prisoners, who would on that day attend the ing evening, when she attempted to remove a Newspaper religious exercises of the prison for the last time. from his bed and substitute a Bible in its stead, he offer “ All these poor women, young and old, clad in the ed to strike her. She added that he was in the habit of blue dress of the prison, having taken their places, mocking at those among his relatives who read ths Bible, Mrs. Fry made her appearance. The peace, the good or went to Church, and that he had been repeatedly warn | will, and the christian love with which her heart is ed that he would die a miserable death ? I may truly say filled shines forth in her noble countenance, the er. that I never bebeld a man sunk to such a depth of misery, pression of which is not disturbed by the cares and trou. wretchedness, and despair, as in the case before me.

bles incident to an advanced period of life. The dress of To-day calling at the house where Mr. N. resided I was the sect to which she belongs, harmonizes with her sim. surprised to find it full of company, and from their voices plicity of mind and manner. The clean muslin cap, quite I was led to judge that they were feasting and merry mak unadorned, sets off her forehead, and shows a small por ing- To my great astonishment I was soon informed that | tion of her fair hair, which age has begun to touch with N. was no more. I learnt the joyful company before me its silvery hue, Even the large and sober folds of ber were the funeral guests.

grey shawl falling from her shoulders, suited her tall The awful picture of poor Mr. N's misery was so fresh figure and her calm and majestic deportment, and was in in my memory that I was much struck with the great con perfect unison with the whole. trast which I saw exhibited before my eyes. The niece * “ After a few minutes of profound silence, Mrs. Fry above mentioned came up to me, and asked me to walk read the third chapter of St. Paul's epistle to the Cointo another room, and there she told me how Mr. N. died. lossians. Those who have heard Mrs. Fry read the scripHis last moments appear even to have been worse than tures agree in thinking that few persons have so peculiar could have been anticipated. Some time before he expir. a gift of setting forth the meaning, and making those ed he calied her up to him, to stand by him, and would who hear her feel the beauties of the Holy Bible, by scarcely suffer her to leave him, saying, “The Lord is simply reading it. throwing fire at me." About an hour ere he expired he «She says" things rather then reads them, and every asked to be assisted out of his bed. He then attempted to word coming from her heart, goes to the heart of her kneel and pray, but the words which he uttered were not hearers. When the chapter is finished, she either adds those of prayer, but that of conscious misery and despair a few remarks, or leaves her auditors to their own reflecand thus he died.

tions, according as she feels moved. We know that in Having listened to this awful detail I went amongst the things of religion, quakers act only from the inspiration company who were drinking, and told them what I knew of the moment. This principle might afford matter of the sufferings and death of Mr. N. and pointed out to for objection. But at the moment of which I am speakthem the danger to which they are thus exposed in thus ing, Mrs. Fry disarmed all criticism, and I thought only treating with contempt the judgments of God.

of feeling and enjoying the scene before me. The last Gradually the company gathered around me, one by one, 1 verse of the chapter, where it is written that God is ad respector of persons, furnished her with a most touching 1 “During this recital, which this excellent woman deliverapplication, humbling towards that portion of the party ed with that inimitable simplicity, which characterises her, present who were among the free, and the happy, and the the eyes of all present were filled with tears, sympathy had well dressed, and comforting towards those unfortunate drawn every one together, had opened all hearts, and beings, who were mourning within the prison bars of made prisoners, and all others who were there to feel as Newgate, and who in two days were to be crowded to one. We all felt that with God there is no respect of pergether in a convict ship. How she sought to carry to the sons, that there is but one way of salvation for all, and that depths of their aflicted and humbled hearts, the conviction this salvation is for all. After a few very solemn words of the divine love of the Saviour, who descends to the very spoken by a minister of Christ, who was present, the prislowest step of the social and moral ladder, to fetch from oners withdrew; and we learnt, with great joy, from Mrs. thence the greatest sinner, that by faith he may exalt him Fry, that she had received excellent accounts of the reto an equality with all other men, nay, infinitely higher ligious state of several women who are now in New South than the greatest among men, who do not see their great Wales, and who are accomplishing the time of their tranness in God! How soothingly she brought before them the | sportation there. assurance, that though they had brought upon themselves "In leaving Newgate, and once more breathing the the ruin of their earthly career, in the eyes of men, in the pure air, and beholding the sun, which never penetrates sight of God, they might all of them open their hearts to through those dismal walls into the deep courts of the Lope, and peace, and happiness. “He is no respecter of prison, we said to one another! how happy we are that persons," she repeated, we are here assembled before these bolts open to us! Is it not owing to the grace of God, God; let us not imagine that His eye distinguishes be manifested before ever we were born, to the pious parents tween free persons honoured by men, and poor prisoners! be blessed us with, to the education we have received, to All are sinners before Him, all must go to the same source the various circumstances of our lives, is it not to God's to obtain peace and bappiness. “Seek those things wbich mercy alone which has made a difference between the are abore, where Christ sitteth at the right hand of God." state of those poor women and our own ? The germ of As she proceeded in her remarks, a striking change was those sins which have brought them to the place where evident in the countenances of the wretched women. Some, they now are ; was it not in our hearts also? Alas, when who upon entering the room, wore that bold and hardened we consider all circumstances as God considers them, our look so common to those accustomed to crime, and who, light, and their ignorance-the restraints which have kept even the sentence of their condemnation cannot bend, gra us, and the temptations and want, which have led them dually became serious and humble; those whose wounded into sin; which of us must not feel, that perhaps, in the pride alone appeared to suffer from their situations, evi. sight of God, we may be far below many a guilty prisoner dently showed that their grief was changing its character, in Newgate. while the conviction dawned upon their minds, that there was for them a responsibility, and a hope which referred to

Christ inviting the sinful Soul to Himself. a far higher tribunal than that of mere human justice, and Why, O man, hast thou left me ? a privilege to regain which was not founded upon vanity; Wby hast thou turned from him that loveth thee? there were others again, from whose downcast looks it Why bast thou again joined thyself to thy enemy? appeared that the inward and painful work of repentance Remember that for thy sake I came down from heaven, was going on in their hearts, and who were evidently re Remember that for thy sake I became flesh. tained by those tears which flowed at those words of con Remember that for thy sake I was born of a virgin. solation and peace.

Remember that for thy sake I went through childhood. “ To encourage them still more, Mrs. Fry related a Remember that for thy sake I was brought low. touching circumstance, shewing the power of the grace of Remember that for thy sake I became poor. God upon one who had been in the same situation as them Remember that for thy sake I lived on the earth. selves; and thus, proving that God is indeed no respecter Remember that for thy sake I was persecuted. of persons. “Before we part," she continued, “ I can Remember that for thy sake I bore evil speaking, reLot help telling you something which happened to myself, proaches, angry words, dishonour, wounds, spitting, and wbich bas very much affected me, and filled me with blows, mockings, and bitter sufferings. gratitade towards God. I was returning from Brighton Remember that for thy sake I was numbered among the yesterday in the stage coach. There was a woman seated transgressors. in the further corner, upon wbom my presence appeared Remember that for thy sake I suffered a cruel death. to make a deep impression. She was silent for some little Remember that for thy sake I was buried. time, but was evidently deeply affected. Presently she I came down from heaven to raise thee to heaven. held out her hand to me, without, however, speaking. I I was made low to exalt thee. thought I remembered having seen her face before ; I took I was made poor to enrich thee. her hand, and asked her name," Mrs. Fry!" she said I was dishonoured to bring glory upon thee, Weeping, “ Mrs. Fry,...... seventeen years ago ...... I was wounded to heal thee. I died that thou mightest in Newgate .......” She could say no more; her sobs have life. choked her utterance. She had said enough ; I remem Thou didst sin, and I took thy sin upon myself. bered her then, and I recollected that at the time, she Thou wast guilty, and I bore thy punishment. had been seated where you are now, listening to the Word Thou wast a debtor, and I paid thy debt. of God. As soon as she had sufficiently recovered herself, Thou wast condemned to death, and I died for thee. she told me, that for the last thirteen years, that is from To this my love and compassion led me; I could not bear the time of her release, she had been in service in a res. that thou should'st suffer such evil. pectable family at Brighton; that now being in an Dost thou despise my love ? Instead of love, thou givest infirm state of health, she was returning to London to me hatred. Thou lovest sin, and not me. enjoy the fruits of her little earnings, and above all, the Thou labourest for thy passions, and not for me. happiness, with which she had first become acquainted Now what dost thou find in me deserving of thy dislike ? within these walls, where we are now assembled, and Why dost thou not wish to come unto me ? where, she blessed God, that Hehad brougbt her; she Dost thou desire good for thyself? Every good is with will be soon in that place, where the children of God enjoy me. true liberty; and have every reason to believe," added Dost thou desire happiness ? Every blessing is with me. Mrs. Fry, « that her hope of salvation is founded upon her Dost thou desire dignity? Who is more noble than the Saviour alone, and that she is a true child of God."

Son of God ?

eder

until I had them all silently listening

mall platform thirty-five in number, and they be

de settees were

de President was to them npwards of an hour, dr

Professors; and be. were shed, and ihe house, v

crowded with young sounded with loose and w

rd of God. into what it ought to

meetings. It was one of Every thing was ar

ed, and before us, crowding then disturbed bv

athered all the wild, irreligious, of their folly ir

en which the institution containservice of Sp

of them; all enmity gone, opposithe glory

aed, and they sat in silence, gazing at Bef

in all his words, as he pressed upon then m to throw down the weapons of their re

submit themselves to God. The text for ollect right, was this, “Notwithstanding, be

kingdom of God has come nigh unto you." the room felt that it was nigh. He spoke in a impressive manner, and every word went to a hun. hearts. Many persons imagine that preaching in jn is loud and noisy, and filled with exciting remarks,

agant gesticulations; and it is so sometimes, when men 1 to make a revival by their own power. But where the

of God really comes, there are very different indications. y one feels irresistibly that God is there, and that he himself .st walk humbly and softly before Him. The almost supernaural power which preaching seems to have at such a time, is the power of simple truth on hearts bowed down before it by influences from above. Such a season robs eloquence and genius of all their power; declamation is more than useless, and all the arts of oratory of no avail. There are souls awed and subdued before God, and longing for the light of truth; and he who can supply these desires with the greatest calmness, and directness, and simplicity, will be the means of producing the most powerful effectsA man could scarcely give utterance to rant, and declamation, and noisy harangue in such a room, even if he had come all prepared to do it. As he entered such a scene, he would be sub dued and calmed by its irresistible influence. He would instinctively feel, that noisy eloquence there would grate upon every ear and shock every heart, and no bold assurance would be sufficient to carry him on.

We listened to the sermon, which was earnest and impressive, though direct, plain, and simple; it told the ungodly hearers before us, that the kingdom of heaven was nigh them, and urged them to enter it. We knew,- we could almost feel that they were entering it; and when at the close of the meeting, we sang our parting hymn, I believe there was as much real, deep-flowing happiness in that small but crowded apartment, as four such walls ever contained.

When the indications of this visit from above first appeared, it was about a fortnight before the close of the term, and in about ten days its object was accomplished. Out of the whole number of those who had been irreligious at its commencement, about one half professed to have given themselves up to God; but as to all the talent, and power of opposition, and open enmity,--the vice, the profaneness, the dissipation,- the revival took the whole With one or two exceptions, it took the whole. And when a few weeks afterwards, the time arrived for those thus changed to make a public profession of religion, it was a striking spectacle to see them standing in a crowd in the broad aisle of the college chapel, purified, sanctified, and in the presence of all their fellow-students, renouncing sin, and solemnly consecrating them. selves to God. Seven years have since elapsed, and they are ia his service now. I have their names before me, and I do not knos of one who does not continue faithful to his Master still.- Frees the CORNER STONE of Jacob Abbot, abridged by the Rer. Henry Blunt, M. A. Rector of Upper Chelsea.

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tion, and in agony he cried out, whilst he rolled himself on his bed, like one distracted, “ God! O my Lord! what shall I do?" But it was evident that his convictions were something like those of Simon Magus. He was afraid, but had no sense whatever of the greatness of his sins. He even sent for me twice, and on those occasions he manifes. ted a strong desire that I should pray by him, and showed a disposition to listen to the word of God; but such feel. ings were only momentary: the Evil Spirit seemed to have supreme power over bim, and infidelity lay at the root of his heart!

He had not given me any reason to suppose that he was an infidel. I discovered it from the following circumstance, which occurred during my last visit to him-his last day upon earth.

He appeared more attentive this day than usual to what I said, and having talked to him for some time on the cessity of believing in the atonement made by Jes Calvary; and perceiving that he seemed affected w I had advanced, I asked him if I should prav. which he replied, “ If you please.". Wber my knees be cried out, seemingly with gr bitterness of soul, “ O Lord! how sbali ficulty which is in my way to believe I might be saved ?" I asked bim on which he looked very wild."", mis Do you believe the Bible to he looked at me in such and shaking his head."

cminent remaining strength

w witty valuable works: « No! No! not

Christian," was reprinted return, and they 29th time. Translated from which they neighbor upon t' S:

of college were not interrupted. The reo religious meetings during the week, unchanged, and I well recollect the ap. matical classes. The students would walk om their rooms, and assemble at the appointain that the hearts of many of them were full

I have described. Others, whose peace was i would sit with downcast eyes, and when it to be questioned, would make an effort to control und finding that they could not recite, would ask them. Others, known heretofore as hardened ene. and religion, sat still, their heads reclined upon the them, with hearts overwhelmed with remorse and sor. Fes filled with tears. I could not ask them a question. ening, I recollect, so strong and so universal were those

that we could not go on. The room was silent as death.

ve was down; I called upon one after another, but in vain; We together prayed God to come and be with us, and bless us.

i to save us and our class-mates from sin and suffering, and then silently went to our rooms.

The buildings were as still this week as if they had been depovulated. The students loved to be alone. They walked about Silently. They said little when they met, as men always do when their hearts are full. Late in the evening they would collect in little circles in one another's rooms, to spend a few moments in prayer. I was often invited to these meetings, and it was delightful to see the little assembly coming into the room at the appointed time, each bringing his own chair, and gathering around the bright burning fire, with the armed chair placed in one corner for their instructor, and the two occupants of the room together upon the other side. They who were present at these meetings will not soon forget the enjoyment with which their hearts were filled, as they bere bowed in supplication before God.

On Tuesday and Thursday evenings we assembled in the larg. est lecture room for more public worship. It was the same room where, a few weeks before, on the same occasions, we could see only here and there one among the vacant, gloomy seats. Now, how changed! At the summons of the evening bell, group after group ascended the stairs, and crowded the benches. It was the rhetorical lecture-room, and was arranged with rows of seats on

at Amherst College, cludeil from our last.)

Toe Revival at am

(Concluded from The ordinary exercises of President held two or threo, but recitations went on uncha pearance of my mathematics silently and slowly from the edd place. It was plain the of such omotions as I ha not made with God. came their turn to be their feelings, and find me to excuse them. mies of God and re seats before them row, and eyes filia

One morning, I re

feelings, that we could Every eye was down :

F CONTRIBUTIONS are to be sent, post or carriage paid, for the Editor, to Messrs. SIMPKIN, MARSHALL & Co., Stationer's Court, London, or to Mr. SEACOME, Bookseller, Chester.

Notice:-Several interesting Contributions are necessarily kept back for a future number of the Christian Beacon.

LONDON : PUBLISHED BY SIMPKIN, MARSHALL, & Co.; HAND

TON, ADAMS, & Co.'; AND R. GROOMBRIDGE; BANCES & Co. MANCHESTER; H. PERRIS, LIVERPOOL'; J. SEACOME, CHES TER.-T. THOMAS, Printer, Eastgate Street Roro, Chester,

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usiness have you to interfere with the creaked under his light tread, the sleeper did not asures of the working classes? Why | stir, he was now fast asleep. The old clergyman "ack the rich ? You are quite mis held up his finger to forbid the mother to disturb think you are going to have every her son, and waited quietly for his waking. The n way. We have not been used stillness of that melancholy chamber was soon

meddling fellows like you, and broken. There was something like a struggle at ve you warning that if you think the street door as it was opened and closed, and n of priestcraft here, it wont do, then opened again. “ Come in I will. You , at least the chief part of them, said my poor boy sent for me. What has the your back. Your long sermons parson to do with me? Whose house is this? urch, but neither you nor any answer me that: come, 'come-take your arm

' crew will be able to empty away or I shall hurt you!” These were the

ses. I am no more an advocate of words which met the ear, the other speaker scuperance than yourself, but it seems that spoke in whispers and few of her words were you set your face against all recreation, and if the heard. “Father, dear father pray wait, don't let place were filled with such as you an honest pub | him hear you-he is so very ill.” The dying lican might starve. ... ... ....'

man had awoke at the first sound of his father's The door of the study opened and the pastor loud voice. He raised himself with difficulty threw down the anonymous letter, he had neither and sat up in bed. the time nor the inclination to read more, he was After he had listened a little while, his called to visita dying parishoner. In a dark cham countenance fell. “It is as I feared," he said, ber, barely and meanly furnished, a young man lay after a short pause. “He is not in a fit state to dying. He was asleep, but so worn and wasted, hear any thing that might be said to him. O so very near death was his bodily frame, that his mother, don't go, you know that he will only ill countenance in sleep wore already the look of a treat you. No, no, he had better come up here Corpse. His mother sat beside his bed with her than do that:" but here the dying man sank back, intensé gazefixed upon him; and affecting was the he was too much exhausted to say more. The contrast between the rigid calmness of the one coun old clergyman left him to his mother, and hastenance and the expression of agonized anxiety tened to prevent the drunken man from coming upon the other. The sleeper started, and awoke. up. He was only just in time, for he saw the His mother rose up, " Tell me dear mother," he girl sink under a blow given by her brutal said, as she bent down over him. “ Is he come father, and met him as he was about to ascend the is the minister come ? and my poor father-have stairs. “Go back at once,” said the Pastor, and they brought him ? I dreamed that they were the gentle, but solemn dignity of his voice both come and waiting till I awoke. I wish to and manner stopt the man. With staring eyes see them together, it is almost my last wish to and widely opened mouth he surveyed him for hear our minister speak to my father, at the some moments and then a silly smile spread over time I take my last leave of you all." “ They his bloated features, and he said, "y....ou're a are not yet come,” said the mother, " there has g....ood man, a v....ery g....ood man, shake hands been scarcely time for your sister to go to the rec with me, y....ou’re a good fellow.” The clergyLory, and then to find your father, you have slept man grasped his wrist and gently led him away. but a short time!” The young man made no re They had not gone many steps when the drunply, but again closed his eyes, and the wretched | ken man resisted; but the old minister had been mother returned to her seat. At length the latch | too well used to the ways of drunkards; he knew of the house door was gently lifted, and the how to deal with them, and at last he succeeded pastor's well known step was heard by the mother in leading the man from the house. He left him in the room below. He came up to the chamber | under the care of a trust-worthy and Christian of the dying man, but although the old stairs neighbour, and he returned to the chamber of

Dost thou seek exaltation? Who is higher than the King

of heaven? Dost thou desire wealth ? I have all riches. Dost thou desire wisdom ? I am wisdom. Dost thou desire friendship? Who is more worthy of

love, and more loving than I ? for I laid down my life

for all. Dost thou seek help? Who can help except me ? Dost thou seek a physician? Who can heal except me? Dost thou seek joy? Who can give joy except me ? Dost thou seek consolation in grief? Who can console

except me ? Dost thou seek rest? Come unto me, and I will give thee

rest. Dost thou seek peace ? I am the peace of the soul. Dost thou seek life ? I am the fountain of life. Dost thou seek light? I am the light of the world. Dost thou seek truth? I am the truth. Dost thou seek the way? I am the way. Dost thon seek a guide to heaven? I am the guide. Why dost thou not wish to come unto me? Dost thou not dare to come ? To whom is there an easier

access? Art thou fearful of asking? Whom, coming unto me with

faith, bare I refused ? Do thy sins hinder thee? I died for sinners. Does the multitude of thy sins distress

thee? In me is abundant mercy. See St. Mathew ll chap. 28, 29, 30. verses.

By Bishop Tehon, who died in 1783. He was eminent for his piety, and left behind him many valuable works; one of which, « The Duties of a Christian," was reprinted in Moscow, in 1835, for the 39th time. Translated from the Russian.

the three sides, and a table for the Professor on a small platform on the fourth. The seats were soon full, and the settees were brought in to fill the area left in the centre. The President was seated at the table; on either side of him the Professors; and be. yond them, and all around, the room was crowded with young men hungering and thirsting after the word of God.

I recollect particularly one of these meetings. It was one of the earliest after the revival commenced, and before us, crowding the settees in the open area, were gathered all the wild, irreligious, vicious, and abandoned young men which the institution contain. ed. There they were, the whole of them; all enmity gone, opposi. tion silenced, and pride subdued, and they sat in silence, gazing at the President, and drinking in all his words, as he pressed upon them their sins, and urged them to throw down the weapons of their rebellion, and come and submit themselves to God. The text for the evening, if I recollect right, was this, “ Notwithstanding, bo ye sure of this, the kingdom of God has come nigh unto you." Every person in the room felt that it was nigb. He spoke in a calı uict, but impressive manner, and every word went to a hun. dred and fifty hearts. Many persons imagine that preaching in such a season is loud and noisy, and filled with exciting remarks, and extravagant gesticulations, and it is so sometimes, when men attempt to make a revival by their own power. But where the Spirit of God really comes, there are very different indications. Every one feels irresistibly that God is there, and that he himself must walk humbly and softly before Him. The almost supernatural power which preaching seems to have at such a time, is the power of simple truth on hearts bowed down before it by infiuences from above. Such a season robs eloquence and genius of all their power; declamation is more than useless, and all the arts of oratory of no avail. There are souls awed and subdued before God, and longing for the light of truth; and he who can supply these desires with the greatest calmness, and directness, and sim. plicity, will be the means of producing the most powerful effects. A man could scarcely give utterance to rant, and declamation, and noisy harangue in such a room, even if he had come all pre pared to do it. As he entered such a scene, he would be sub dued and calmed by its irresistible influence. He would instinctively feel, that noisy eloquence there would grate upon every ear and shock every heart, and no bold assurance would be sufficient to carry him on.

We listened to the sermon, which was earnest and impressive, though direct, plain, and simple; it told the ungodly hearers be fore us, that the kingdom of heaven was nigh them, and urged them to enter it. We knew,- we could almost feel that they were entering it; and when at the close of the meeting, we sang our parting hymn, I believe there was as much real, deep-flowing happiness in that small but crowded apartment, as four such walls ever contained.

When the indications of this visit from above first appeared, it was about a fortnight before the close of the term, and in about ten days its object was accomplished. Out of the whole number of those who had been irreligious at its commencement, about ce half professed to have given themselves up to God; but as to all the talent, and power of opposition, and open enmity,- the vict. the profaneness, the dissipation,- the revival took the whole. With one or two exceptions, it took the whole. And when a few weeks afterwards, the time arrived for those thus changed to make a public profession of religion, it was a striking spectacle to see them standing in a crowd in the broad aisle of the college chapel, purified, sanctified, and in the presence of all their fellow-students, renouncing sin, and solemnly consecrating them selves to God. Seven years have since elapsed, and they are ia his service now. I have their names before me, and I do not know of one who does not continue faithful to his Master still.- Free the CORNER STONE of Jacob Abbot, abridged by the Rer. Hy Blunt, M. A. Rector of Upper Chelsea.

The Revival at Amherst College.

(Concluded from our last.) The ordinary exercises of college were not interrupted. The President held two or three religious meetings during the week, but recitations went on unchanged, and I well recollect the ap. pearance of my mathematical classes. The students would walk silently and slowly from their rooms, and assemble at the appointed place. It was plain that the hearts of many of them were full of such emotions as I have described. Others, whose peace was not made with God, would sit with downcast eyes, and when it came their turn to be questioned, would make an effort to control their feelings, and finding that they could not recite, would ask me to excuse them. Others, known heretofore as hardened ene. mies of God and religion, sat still, their heads reclined upon the seats before them, with hearts overwhelmed with remorse and sor. row, and eyes filled with tears. I could not ask them a question. One morning, I recollect, so strong and so universal were those feelings, that we could not go on. The room was silent as death. Every eve was down; I called upon one after another, but in vain : and we together prayed God to come and be with us, and bless us, and to save us and our class-mates from sin and suffering, and then silently went to our rooms.

The buildings were as still this week as if they had been depopulated. The students loved to be alone. They walked about silently. They said little when they met, as men always do when their hearts are full. Late in the evening they would collect in little circles in one another's rooms, to spend a few moments in prayer. I was often invited to these meetings, and it was delightful to see the little assembly coming into the room at the appointed time, each bringing his own chair, and gathering around the bright burning fire, with the armed chair placed in one corner for their instructor, and the two occupants of the room together upon the other side. They who were present at these meetings will not soon forget the enjoyment with which their hearts were filled, as they here bowed in supplication before God.

On Tuesday and Thursday evenings we assembled in the larg. est lecture room for more public worship. It was the same room where, a few weeks before, on the same occasions, we could see only here and there one among the vacant, gloomy seats. Now, how changed! At the summons of the evening bell, group after group ascended the stairs, and crowded the benches. It was the rhetorical lecture-room, and was arranged with rows of seats on

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