Select Poetry: Chiefly on Subjects Connected with Religion

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Seeleys, 1860 - 272 páginas

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Página 253 - Perhaps the Christian volume is the theme. How guiltless blood for guilty man was shed; How he who bore in Heaven the second name Had not on earth whereon to lay His head ; How His first followers and servants sped. The precepts sage they wrote to many a land How he who lone, in Patmos banished. Saw in the sun a mighty angel stand. And heard great Babylon's doom pronounced by Heaven's command. Then kneeling down, to Heaven's Eternal King, The saint, the father, and the husband prays; Hope "springs...
Página 231 - That day of wrath, that dreadful day, When heaven and earth shall pass away, What power shall be the sinner's stay? How shall he meet that dreadful day? When, shrivelling like a parched scroll, The flaming heavens together roll, When louder yet, and yet more dread, Swells the high trump that wakes the dead ! O, on that day, that wrathful day, When man to judgment wakes from clay, Be THOU the trembling sinner's stay, Though heaven and earth shall pass away!
Página 76 - HOW sweet the Name of Jesus sounds In a believer's ear ! It soothes his sorrows, heals his wounds, And drives away his fear.
Página 172 - Prayer is the simplest form of speech That infant lips can try ; Prayer, the sublimest strains that reach The Majesty on high. 4 Prayer is the Christian's vital breath, The Christian's native air, His watchword at the gates of death • He enters heaven with prayer. :. Prayer is the contrite sinner's voice Returning from his ways; While angels in their songs rejoice, And cry,
Página 114 - Strong in the Lord of Hosts, And in his mighty power; Who in the strength of Jesus trusts Is more than conqueror.
Página 195 - Like to the falling of a star; Or as the flights of eagles are; Or like the fresh spring's gaudy hue; Or silver drops of morning dew; Or like a wind that chafes the flood; Or bubbles which on water stood; Even such is man, whose borrowed light Is straight called in, and paid to night. The wind blows out; the bubble dies; The spring entombed in autumn lies; The dew dries up; the star is shot; The flight is past; and man forgot.
Página 86 - JUST as I am, without one plea, But that thy blood was shed for me, And that thou bid'st me come to thee, O Lamb of God, I come!
Página 194 - The glories of our blood and state Are shadows, not substantial things ; There is no armour against fate ; Death lays his icy hand on kings : Sceptre and crown Must tumble down, And in the dust be equal made With the poor crooked scythe and spade. Some men with swords may reap the field, And plant fresh laurels where they kill : But their strong nerves at last must yield ; They tame but one another still : Early or late They stoop to fate, And must give up their murmuring breath When they, pale captives,...
Página 207 - TO BLOSSOMS. Fair pledges of a fruitful tree, Why do ye fall so fast? Your date is not so past ; But you may stay yet here awhile, To blush and gently smile, And go at last.
Página 39 - A thousand ages in thy sight Are like an evening gone, Short as the watch that ends the night Before the rising sun.

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