Imágenes de páginas
PDF
[graphic][subsumed][ocr errors][subsumed]

THE

I L I AD

OF

HOMER.

Translated by Mr. POPE.

Te fequor, O Graia gentis Decus!, inque tuis nunc
Fixa pedum pono preffis veftigia fignis :
Non ita certandi cupidus, quàm propter amorem,
Quòd te imitari aveo

LUCRET.

The SECOND EDITION.

LONDON:
Printed by W. BOWYER, for BERNARD LINTOT

between the Temple-Gates. MDCCXX.

[graphic][subsumed][ocr errors][subsumed]
[graphic][subsumed][merged small]

OMER is universally allow'd to have

had the greatest Invention of any writer whatever. The praise of judgment Virgil has justly contested with him, and others may have their pre

tenfions as to particular excellencies; but his Invention remains yet unrival'd. Nor is it a wonder if he has ever been acknowledg'd the greatest of poets, who moft excell'd in that which is the very foundation of poetry. It is the Inven-tion that in different degrees distinguishes all great Genius's: The utmost ftretch of human ftudy, learn-ing, and induftry, which mafter every thing besides, can never attain to this. It furnishes art with all her materials, and without it, Judgment it self can at belt. but steal wifely: For Art is only like a prudent stew ard that lives on managing the riches of Nature. Whatever praises may be given to works of judga ment, there is not even a single beauty in them buc: is owing to the invention: As in the most regular gardens, however art may carry the greatest appearance, there is not a plant or flower but is the gift of nature. The first can only reduce the beauties of the latter into a more obvious figure, which the common eye inay better take in, and is therefore

more

[ocr errors][ocr errors]

They pour along like a fire that sweeps the whole carth bec 'fore it. 'Tis however remarkable that his fancy, which

« AnteriorContinuar »