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SOUTHERN LITERARY MESSENGER--VOLUME X.

22

A.

L.

PAGE

PAGE

Army, Notes on our, No. I.

86 Landscape Gardening

306

« No. U.

155 Literature, A Native

378

« No. III.

246 Literary Property

415

« No. IV.

283 Love Sketches

545-616-731

* No. V.

372 Leigh Hunt's Poems. Review of

619

" No. VI.

750 Literary Life of Thingum Bob, the

719

Army, Notes on our. Reply to a Subaltern

509
Army Again, our

510

M.
Alpine Scenes.

521
Adieu to Patrons and Friends

81-169-206
757

Maltese People, Superstitions of the
Mount Ararat and the Three Churches

131

B.

Melaia and Other Poems

167

Blindness and the Blind

30

Mormon Faith and People--the Rise and Pro-

British Interference

526
584
* Blind Preacher" and " The British Spy," the

548
679

May Day,-A Village Tale
Mind, the, ils Powers and Results

662

C.

Malta, the Maltese, and a word of English Colo-

Classical Studies

70
nial Rule

728

Cuba, Notes on

96

Mountain Scenery of Virginia

735

Caucasian Master and African Slave, relation

N.

between the

329

Classic Relic Recovered, A

569 National Institute

572

Cicisbeo; or Customs of Sicily, the

601-681 Notices of New Works. 64-123–188-263-327-389-446

512-573-639-702-763

D.

Donna Florida. A Tale

18

0.

De Mortier; A Tale of the French Revolution

52

Oration, Mr. Webster's Bunker Hill

25

Desultory Notes on Desultory Readings 384-635-699-754 Observatory at Washington

254

Disintegration of Letters, the

410

Our Kate

554

Dickson's Poems-Notice of

424

Demon's Game of Chess, the

481

P.

Patrons, the Editor to his

1

Enchanted Gifts, the

Proverbial Philosophy

89
Edward Moreland, a Passage in the Life of

73
Portrait, My Daughter's

114
E. D. and Mr. Simms, reply to

159-217-298

193-289

Pretension, A Tale

English Orthography

229-438
544

Profane Genesis
Economy of Life, the

233
648-714

Poetical Similarities
Editor's Table
61-121-181-262-306-387-757
Prize Tale, the

277-349-426
Poet's Mission, the

303
F.
Pliny the Younger

360-444-505-608

538-673
Fine Arts, the Influence of, on the Moral Sensibilities 109 Present Condition of Letters
French and English Propagandism

577

R.
Friendship

615
"Fair Play"- Answer to
630 Relics, Interesting

78
Reginald de Lacy-a Passage in the Life of

209

Recollections of Six Days' Journey in the Moon 434-492

Georgia Scenes, Darby Anvil
43 Rural and Domestic Life in Germany, the

563
Gibraltar, Letters from

93

Gossip about a few Books

252

S.

Gulf Stream and Currents of the Sea. Paper on the 393 “Stone House," the

40

Gleanings from different Histories, or an Historical

Shelley

104

Sketch of the Knights of Malta

496

Slavery in the French Colonies

268

Gertrude ; A Novel

513-641-705 Speculative Philosophy. Cui Bono?

357

H.

Schoolmaster, the First

552

Heroes in America

Sciote Captive, the

592-652
69

Hope

599

T.

I.

Thirty years passed among the Players in England

International Copyright Law

166
7-137-340-449
and America

240
Insanity in the United States. On the Distribution of 178 Tennyson's Poems

Texas, the Annexation of

315-383
Insanity in Criminal Cases, the Plea of

667

U.

J.

Jeptha Leathers; or the Philosophy of Failure 485 University of Virginia, the Society of Alumni of the 635

L.

V.

Literature, Cheap

33 Voyage in the East, in 1843–Extracts from

Literary Associations

152 Notes of

367-502

Legend of the Shepherd's Clock, the
287 'Virginia, the Colonial History of

631-691

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ORIGINAL POETRY.
A.

N.
PAGE

PAGE
Axe of the Settler, the-by Mary E. Hewitt
39 Night, by Anna M. Hirat

17
Absent Sister's Lament, the
554 Not Again, by Judge A. B. Meek

30
Autumn-by the Stranger
737 Night, the Coming on of, by H. B. Hirst

33
B.

469
Nature's Lesson, by A. B. Meek
Night, by E. B. Hale

614
Burial of Eros, the-by Henry B. Hirst
92 Niagara, by C. C.L

647
Betrayed, the

276
Burial at Sea, by Dr. Jno. C. McCabe

0.

282
Bivouac in the Desert, A

306
Once Again
409
Our Younger, Happier Days, by L. J. Cist

349
C.

P.
Chaos, by Wm. Oland Bourne

22
Crusader's Return-by D. H. Robinson

Parents' Lament over their child, Louisa Overton, the 85
106

326
Cottage, the

Poesy
276
Poet's Grave, the

339
D.
Parting from Niagara

571
Doom of the Children, the-by Wm. Oland Bourne

President's Bride, to the-by Owen G. Warren
201

666
Dead Man's Race, the-by W. G. Blackwood

296

R.
E.

Reflections at the Grave of Midshipman who
fell in a duel

372
Early Lays, by W. Gilmore Simms

79
Endymion, by H. B. Hirst

S.

440
Evening Walk, an
563 Sonnet Writing, by D. H. Robinson

60
F.

72
Song of the Scald, Biorne, the-by H. B. Hirst
Surrender, the-A Sonnet

96
Forsaken Irish Girl, the-by Eliza of Maine
490 Sunflowers, the-Versified from the German

154
Funeral of Time, the-by H. B. Hirst
525 Stanzas-Self-Reckoning,

167
Forsaken, the-by Anna M. Hirst
630 Southern Lyre's Waking Moments, the

181
G.

Sonnets from Petrarch, by Miss Mary G.
Wells

200-502-661
Goodness
106 Sonnet, Endurance-by Anna M. Hirst

246
Give me a Talisman of Love
114 Sonnet, My Lady's Absence

251
Graces, the-by E. B. Hale
168 Sonnet-by D. H. Robinson

315
Grouped Thoughts and Scattered Fancies. A col-

Stars, the-by Isherwood

359
lection of Sonnets
422-433-520 Stanzas-by C. M. A.

377
God Bless the Mariner, by Mary E. Hewitt 538 Song. Inscribed to one about to form “ A Marriage
Geraldine, by H. B. Hirst

619
of Convenience"

377
H.

Sonnets-hy Anna M. Hirst 1. The Desolated.
JI. The Poet's Grave

496
Holy Hour, the-by Mrs. E. J. Eames

165
Sonnet, on Reading the Odyssey

504
Honors Poesy-to Woman, the

638
Sonnet, to Helen-by John Tomlin

569
Hymn to Jove-by Cleanthes

569
I.
Sonnets to Franklin's Printing Press

538
Iphigenia at Tauris. A Dramatic Poem 2-65-129-265

T.
Irish Exile, the-by Thomas Duon English

with a Withered Rose Bud

43
Isabelle. A Ballad, by H. B. Hirst
Imitations from Anacreon

199 Tableaux,” the-A Dream-by H. P. Vass, De-
501
ceased

158
I Will Weep-by the Young Bard of N. Hampshire 651 Thou shalt Ne'er be Gay

367
Iron Steed, ihe-from a Poem, by Payne Kenyon

Trifles Light as Air-by A. B. Meek

377
Kilbourn
671 The Harp I Touched

496
L.
To Mary- by J. Strong Rice

542
Lines by a Father, on the Death of a Child. Ad-

Tempest of the Soul, the-by Mrs. Maria G. Buch-
dressed to the Mother
88

5A3
Lines, Suggested by the Death of Sister Claudia 177 Thoughts-by John C. McCabe

607
Lines, by Mrs. Maria G. Buchanan

228
The Time to Die-by E. B. Hale

678
Lines to the Absent

547
Two Mothers, the-by Mrs. E. J. Eames

678
Lines. “What Shadows we are, what Shadows

Thoughts suggested by a Picture of Westminster Abbey 713
we Pursue"

571 Triumph of Religion, ihe-by Mrs. Maria G. Buchanan 734
Lines, Written after Sickness, by Mrs. E. J. Eames 630
Love of Country-by Lewis J. Cist.

719 Vision of Drythelm, the-by Mrs. Jane L. Swift 151
Lines suggested on seeing the Stanzas upon the words
“Woman, thy Place is Behind the Throne 753

W.
M.
Warriors, the two-by N. C. Brooks

25
Widowej Grief; A Pair of Portraits

52
Moonlight Musings, by E. B. Hale
76 Wife's Prayer for her Husband at Sea, the

166
Mother, to my-by Mrs. Maria G. Buchanan

103
“Woman, thy Place is Bebind the throne"

633
Mildred, to-by D. H. Robinson
178 Woman's Eyes, the Light of

731
Maid of Roanoke

746
Musings, by Dr. John C. McCabe

356
Mocking.Bird, heard during sickness, to a-by L. V. 414

Y.
Mother, to my-by J. Strong Rice

470 Young Bard of New Hampshire, the-hy Am. South 507
May-Day Addresses
550 | Young Mother, the-by C. c. L.

648

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727 Sunrise

88 To E.

anan

V.

315 Wood worth

PUBLISHED MONTHLY, AT FIVE DOLLARS PER ANNUM-BENJAMIN B. MINOR, EDITOR AND PROPRIETOR.

VOL. X.

RICHMOND, JANUARY, 1844.

NO. 1.

THE EDITOR TO HIS PATRONS.

Knowledge, rest content, whilst any scheme for

Intellectual improvement and Literary honor is Hoping that a “merry Christmas” has gladdened demanding their support ?! your hearts, leaving them untouched by its frost, For the ensuing year, our own efforts shall be we again greet you with “a happy New Year.” unremitting and we will receive the constant aid What matters it that chill Winter has come, binding of many of the ablest pens in the Union ;-Esall Nature in his icy chains, if he touch not with sayists, Poets, Novelists, Critics and Historians. his lorpor the generous impulses of noble hearts ? They have assured us of their good will and some Though his blasts howl around us, as now, making have given solid proof of their intention to sustain us almost idolize “our own fire side,” where we so us. THEY DEEM IT ESSENTIAL TO THE SOUTH TO "tranquilly abide,” it may still be sunshine and Spring Have suCH A WORK AND CRY SHAME UPON HER SONS within our minds. Let the frosts of selfishness FOR NOT SPEEDING IT ON WITH MORE GENEROUS AID. never freeze the generous current of the soul; but Nothing is wanting, in order to sustain, in the heart Jet the genial warmth of kindred spirits, the ardor of the South and with the South in its heart, the of chaste Love and the fervor of devoted Friend- best toned, best printed and best filled Magazine in ship keep it limpid, flowing and sparkling forever. the whole Union, but Patrons; or, to speak more

There is a glory and a use in Nature's winter, plainly, prompt, paying subscribers. with all its cold and storm. With what grandeur We foresee that the pretended, or supposed cheapand splendor the mountain rears its snow-turbaned ness of lower priced Periodicals will be an obstahead! What Beauty spangles the gem-decked trees! cle in our way. Common honesty requires that What Joy fills the throng that glide, like spirits in those who do not furnish but three dollars' worth a dream, over the surface of the shining lake! should demand no more. Is it not better, judicious And beneath Winter's chilling robe spring the and economical readers, to give a guinea for a guiflowers and the grain. But what glory, what beauty, nea than a shilling for a sixpence ; or, what is still what good in the blasts of human passion, or the worse, than imitate the gourmand, who gave his benumbing selfishness of Ignoble Natures! last guinea for an ortelan? Many think, that after

The monarch of the sunny clime could not be their money has been changed into good Messenger persuaded that Winter ever laid his stiff hand upon paper, they get what is worth a premium. The the flowing streams and made them bear the tramp existence of the Messenger, with its distinctive of men. If he was as ignorant of the freezing tone, is and has been worth to the South more thoucoldness of the heart, what Bliss he knew! May sands than enough to establish it forever. The the constant sunshine of Christmas mirth, New Messenger can not be too large for a month's readYear happiness and every day joy keep you from ing. By reduction of size and loss of character, experiencing it, and make you as incredulous of it it could be brought to the level of three dollar as was the Eastern King of the existence of ice. cheapness,--but no true friend can desire to see

Another year, with its hopes, its duties and its this done. You may lop the noble oak, until noaims, is opening before us. Different occupations thing is left but its unsightly trunk, fit only to invite the energy of our spirits. Go on with brave be burned; or you may eut it down and leave hearts and strong hands—the wilderness of Life only its misshapen stump; but, in order to enjoy will fall before you and smiling homes and spreading, its beauty and shade, you must extend its spreadteeming fields will reward and bless your efforts. ing branches, by watering its roots and fertilizing

We approve the custom of the Editor commen- its soil. Sooner than see the Messenger disparcing each volume with a little friendly chat with aged and brought down from its present exalted pohis patrons. He has to thank the firm and stead-sition, we had rather see it fall. Southerners, fast, to incite the faltering, to arouse the supine you can preserve it, as it stands; and who had not and invoke anew the aid of all the friends of Lite- rather see the proud monument, reared in honor of rary Enterprise. He has to congratulate his readers some noble achievement, shattered by the lightupon the delight he has afforded them, to unfold ning, or uprooted by the earthquake, than suffered to them his plans, and to commune with them about to moulder and decay, by the neglect of those who his prospects—ah! and he has to regret that many should have cherished and perpetuated it. are so indifferent to the noble cause, in which he is What are the few thousand patrons of the Mesengaged, as to withdraw, or withhold their encour- senger to the vast number of those to whose inagement and support. How can any, whose hearts terest, to whose patriotism and appreciation of and minds have been visited by the “Day-star" of' laudable enterprise it strongly appeals? We can

VOL. X-1

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IN FIVE ACTS.

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not rest satisfied, nor feel proud of the South until IPHIGENIA AT TAURIS. she has sent us TEN THOUSAND subscribers.

A DRAMATIC POEM. We are almost ready to resolve that we will have this number if we have to go through the land, a second Peter the Hermit. Come then, ye (Translated from the German of Goëthé.) sons of the South, who love your own land, and ye sons of the North, who wish a bond of union with

The Grecian host, destined for the destruction of Troy,

was assembled at Aulis. All was now ready and each Gre. your brethren—who wish to reciprocate that gene- cian bosom burned to avenge the injured Helen. There lay rous patronage which your every effort receives the ships freighted with heros and all the munitions of war; from us ;-Come and enroll your names in behalf but in vain they waited for propitious winds. Agamemnon, of the Messenger. To you, most generous and

King of Men," the commander of this mighty host, had steady Patrons, we owe unbounded thanks, and killed the favorite stag of Diana, and the Goddess, in disshall strive, unremittingly, to requite you

for

pleasure, allowed “not one favoring breeze to swell his your

flagging sails." favors, by sending you a work worthy of yourselves.

Calchas “disclosed the fates" and demanded the costly To effect this, let none be Patrons in name only- sacrifice of Iphigenia, Agamemnon's cherished daughter, but all in deed and in truth. Let every friend en- to appease “ the Queen dispensing light.” The father's list his friends; every gifted pen pour fourth its love hardly yields to the Greek's devotion ; but the wiley treasures and all unite to rear a monument of talent Ulysses is sent to lure the dedicated victim and her mother

to the camp, under the pretence of marrying Iphigenia to worthy of the Fathers we have buried, of the land the Great Achilles. The hour arrives, the Altar is prewhich they left us, of the privileges we possess pared and the victim, now willing, is ready to die; but and the destiny that awaits us.

Diana ransoms the maiden, and enshrouding her in a cloud, At this season of Christmas Gifts and New Year bears her away to Tauris, in the present Crimea, and Presents, it may be expected that we should offer makes her priestess of her Temple there. What happened

there the play will best unfold. you something more substantial than sentiment, or

Euripides, in his works, bas celebrated Iphigenia both exhortation. Alas! alas !! we have neither“Mys- at Aulis and at Tauris. The German poet has represented teries of Paris," Newspaper “ Annuals,” nor any some incidents differently from him. The name of the other unrivalled “Premiums,” to offer you. A author of the following translation would give it weight; cordial greeting and our Messenger's stores--our

but we must confine ourselves to saying, that it has been “ heart and lute”—are all we can give you. On: bigtily approved by a German scholar and by an excellent

judge of its English Dress.- Ed. Mess. ye grown up children, will not these suffice? If not, then sincerely do we hope, that St. Nicholas

DRAMATIS PERSONÆ. has well filled your hanging socks with sugar plums and fire-crackers. But ye, whose devotion did not

IPHIGENIA, Priestess of the Temple of Diana at Tauris and

Daughler of Agamemnon. propitiate the bountiful Nicholas, be not disconso- Thoas, King of Tauris. late ; for your fond mothers have, or will, no doubt, Arcas, his Minister. award you the portion of that “big boy,”

Orestes, Brother of Iphigenia.

PYLADES, his friend..
“ Little Jack Horner,

SCENE.-The grove before Diana's Temple.
Who sat in a corner,

Eating his Christmas pie."
But indeed we are disposed to be liberal-yes we

ACT I.-SCENE 1: will astonish you by our generosity. Then,“ dear

Iphigenia alone. friends, sweet friends,” if you will only turn over Through your deep shades, ye high and waving summits, a new leaf with us, what will we not do for you?— of this old consecrated leafy grove, Yes, yes, we must be liberal. We will give you I move, e'en now, with shuddering emotion,

As in Diana's silent sanctuary, free permission to read the Messenger through— As if I ne'er before had trod your mazes ; and-and-to pay for it. Nor shall your precious Nor does my soul yet find itself at home. privileges end here ; for, in the best faith, we prou So many years have I been here concealed mise to renew this “charter of your Liberties” By that high will, to which I meekly bow; when, with the blessing of Heaven, we come to For ah! From all I love the sea divides me,

And yet, as at the first, I am a stranger. celebrate the birth-day of another year. . Till then, And, standing on the shore the live long day, Joy, Peace and Truth attend' your steps.

My yearning spirit, o'er the watery waste,
Stretches herself to seek the shores of Greece ;
While to my sighs the roaring waves give back

Their sullen, hoarse, unsympathizing voice.
To think rightly is of Knowledge ; to speak fluently is of Wo to the wretch, who, far from home and kindred,
Nature ;

Must mourn in solitude lise's dearest joys
To read with profit is of care ; hut to write aptly is of Dashed from his lip. His thronging thoughts still roam
practice.

Back to his Father's balls, back to the scenes, To be accurate, write ; to remember, write ; to know thine Where first the fair Sun to his eye disclosed own mind, write. ,

The face of Heaven ; where the sports of childhood,
Tupper. Strengthening the ties of blood, still closer drew

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