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meis T. vich 25 as more unesceptionable, than that Tinker. He is Gor. Bradford. For 36 years, he Kurer'a as the pillar of the Plymouth Colony. S**veue LTO-As patriotism was ardent and incor

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in van vere si ing through the first age

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ing the confidence and the attachment_order, and the civil constitution be reof the people and rested from his labors 'gulated by the great precepts of the in a good old age. Though it would 'word of God. To commence the opbe highly pleasing to have a nearer : erations of this arduous work, perhaps, view of these eminent fathers, equally no person could have been more forillustrious for vigor of mind, for chris- tunately selected than Gov. Endicot. tian piety, and eminent usefulness, in He fullý possessed the object of the our present historic sketch, they must proprietors, for its accomplishment no bie passed with the bare mention of one was more ardent than himself, their names, and the willing tribute of while he fully realized the difficulties grateful remembrance.

which must, necessarily, be encounterMr. Endicot was a native of Dorset- ed. Though sanguine in his hopes, he shire in the west of England, born about ever knew his own weakness, he knew the year 1595.* The Rev. Mr. White, that he was engaged in the cause of the great promoter of the Massachusetts God, and that all help must come from settlement, belonged to Dorchester the shim. He had, indeed, a strong confishire town of that county. From that 'dence that the divine Saviour would town and its vicinity, came many of the do great things for his church in this principal planters of that colony. Mr. land, but he was ever mindful that it Endicot was one of the original Paten-, would be done in such a way that bimtees, who in the year 1628, made a pur- self and not his instruments would chase from the Council of Plymouth, of have the praise. that tract of country which now consti- By the great exertions of Mr. Entutes the principal part of the state of dicot, by his influence and example, Massachusetts. In the summer of that the company of planters, though they year, the proprietors sent over Mr. Ed arrived late in the season, made a dicot with about an hundred planters to comfortable provision for their accomcommence a settlement. He landed atmodation in the ensuing winter. It Salem, and laid the foundation of the does not appear that they endured any rising colony. Mr. Endicot had the severe sufferings, from privations or sole management, and was constituted sickness. Divine worship was mainthe governor of the new plantation:tained for the first year by the care Situated in an extensive wilderness, and efforts of Mr. Endicot, though the with the care of such a number of ad-|| company were but partially supplied venturers wholly unused to the nature with gospel ministrations. In this of a new country, vast was the burden time, the governor was careful to culwhich lay upon him. But his resolu- tivate an intercourse with the infant tion, his perseverance, his zeal for the settlement at Plymouth, and having church of Christ, in the cause of which become acquainted with their ecclesihe was primarily engaged, were equal astical order, he cordially approved to every difficulty.

of their system, and united with them Various had been the projects for the in Christiati fellowship. For much settlement of New-England for the sake important information and assistance of gain. All these had failed. The he was indebted to Gov. Bradford and company which had now undertaken to the people of Plymouth. accomplish the same object, had for In the summer of 1629, the new set. their chief design the formation of a settlement received an accession of about tlement on the principles of religion.—three hundred planters from England. They resolved on a noble effort for the With these came those two eminent erection of a Christian commonwealth; divines, Mr. Higginson and Mr. Skelin which, the churches should be estab-ton. They met with a most cordial lished on the pure principles of gospel, reception from Mr. Endicot, to whom * I have not been able to learn his age ex.

they brought a commission of continu

ance in his gofernment. Soon ater o VT. II.

actly

historical pieces, which, judging from 69th year of his age, he slept with his those parts which remain, must have fathers. been very valuable; but the most of There is no character among the fathem are unfortunately lost. His fa- thers of New-England, transmitted to vorite study was Theology, in which us as more unesceptionable, than that he made great proficiency. He was of Gov. Bradford. For 36 years, he well versed in the religious controver-was the pillar of the Plymouth Colony. sies of his time, and was an able advo- | His patriotism was ardent and incorcate for truth.

ruptible, without haughtiness or self-inIn his Christian character, Mr. Brad-terest. His wisdom was practical, enford was no less distirguished than as lightened by science and guided by aca Magistrate and the founder of a pros-curate observation. His care embraperous colony. In early life, he beced all objects within the compass of came a subject of sanctifying grace. his duty, and bis attention escaped His religious sentiments were formed none.- His firmness was above the on mature reflection, and a careful ex-reach of casualty or craft. His demeaamination of the holy scriptures as the nor always inspired confidence, and he only standard of truth. His opinions could ever command the minds of 'on gospel doctrines, and the order and men. The virtues of his private life discipline of the christian church, were were no less conspicuous than those of such as have been generally maintain his public character. For these no ed by the New-England churches. Dur-| less than for his public services he was ing the long destitute state of the Plym- always beloved. He possessed a perouth church, the wisdom and steadfast-fect command of himself. We find ness of Gov. Bradford were eminently no record of any hasty or rash measinstrumental in preserving them from ure in his conduct, or of any passiondisorder, and from a departure from ate speech to have fallen from him.-the truth. He often assisted in the du. As a Christian, he was meek and faithties of divine worship, in public, as well||ful, and now rests in the inheritance of as in a more private manner, when de- the just.* prived of the labors of a minister. He The illustrious coadjutors of Gov. was a faithful observer of the private Bradford, who united with him in layduties of the Christian character ; con- ing the foundation of the Plymouth stant in the services of religion ; grave and supporting through the first age and humble in his deportment; yet the work which they had reared, richly cheerful and singularly uniform. No deserve the tribute of historic memorichanges diverted him from the path of|al. Gov. Winslow was their faithful duty; no disappointments shook his and successful agent in all foreign emconfidence in God. His attainments bassies; to the Indian tribes, and to the in grace were eminent. For several parent country. Gov. Prince was a jumonths preceding his death, he was in dicious statesman, an upright magisa weak and declining state, from trate, and a valuable historian. Cap. which he was convinced he should not Standish was their undanted hero who

As he grew worse, contem-led all their millitary expeditions, notplating, on a certain night, the charac- less skilled in conduct than vigerous iš ter and truths of the Redeemer, his action. Their worthy elder the Rev. soul was filled with extatic joy, long- Mr. Brewster, who, through modesty, ing to be with Christ. He informed declined the pastoral office, distinhis friends, the next morning, that the guished for his learning and piety pergood Spirit of God had given him the formed the ministerial duties for many first fruits of his eternal glory. His years to great acceptance, ever enjoywork on earth was done, his soul was allied to the church in Heaven. The land by Mr. Bradford, is still preserved and

• A Chair which was brought from Eng. day following, May 9th, 1657, in the used at Plymouth.

recover'.

ing the confidence and the attachment order, and the civil constitution be reof the people and rested from his labors gulated by the great precepts of the in a good old age. Though it would : word of God. To commence the opbe highly pleasing to have a nearer erations of this arduous work, perhaps, view of these eminent fathers, equally no person could have been more forillustrious for vigor of mind, for chris- tunately selected than Gov. Endicot. tian piety, and eminent usefulness, in He fully possessed the object of the our present historic sketch, they must proprietors, for its accomplishment no bte passed with the bare mention of one was more ardent than himself, their names, and the willing tribute of while he fully realized the difficulties grateful remembrance.

which must, necessarily, be encounterMr. Endicot was a native of Dorset- ed. Though sanguine in his hopes, he shire in the west of England, born about ever knew his own weakness, he knew the year 1595.* The Rev. Mr. White, that he was engaged in the cause of the great promoter of the MassachusettsGod, and that all help must come from settlement, belonged to Dorchester the shim. He had, indeed, a strong confishịre town of that county. From that|dence that the divine Saviour would town and its vicinity, came many of the do great things for his church in this principal planters of that colony. Mr. land, but he was ever mindful that it Endicot was one of the original Paten-would be done in such a way that bimtees; who in the year 1628, made a pur- self and not his instruments would chase from the Councilof Plymouth, of have the praise. that tract of country which now consti- By the great exertions of Mr. En. tutes the principal part of the state of dicot, by his influence and example, Massachusetts. In the summer of that the company of planters, though they year, the proprietors sent over Mr. En arrived late in the season, made a dicot with about an hundred planters to comfortable provision for their accomcommence a settlement. He landed at modation in the ensuing winter. It Salem, and laid the foundation of the does not appear that they endured any rising colony. Mr. Endicot had the severe sufferings, from privations or sole management, and was constituted sickness. Divine worship was mainthe governor of the new plantation:tained for the first year by the care Situated in an extensive wilderness, and efforts of Mr. Endicot, though the with the care of such a number of ad-|| company were but partially supplied venturers wholly unused to the nature with gospel ministrations. In this of a new country, vast was the burden time, the governor was careful to culwhich lay upon him. But his resolutivate an intercourse with the infant tion, his perseveranoe, his zeal for the settlement at Plymouth, and having church of Christ, in the cause of which become acquainted with their ecclesihe was primarily engaged, were equal astical order, he cordially approved to every difficulty.

of their sygem, and united with them Various had been the projects for the in Christia i fellowship. For much settlement of New-England for the sake important is formation and assistance of gain. All these had failed. The he was inde ted to Gov. Bradford and company which had now undertaken to the people of Plymouth. accomplish the same object, had for In the sur mer of 1629, the new set. their chief design the formation of a settlement receved an accession of about tlement on the principles of religion.— three hundre i planters from England. They resolved on a noble effort for the With these ame those two eminent erection of a Christian commonwealth; divines, Mr. Higginson and Mr. Skelin which, the churches should be estab- ton. They met with a most cordial lished on the pure principles of gospel, reception from Mr. Endicot, to whom

* I have not been able to learn his age es- they brought a commission of continyactly

ance in his government. Soon after O ViTy, II,

the arrival of this second company, the to do this by the example of King Hezgovernor and the ministers proceeded ekiah, in destroying the brazen serpent to the formation of a Christian church. which had been set up by Moses.me This was done, in the month of Au- The brazen Serpent was in itself no gust, with the most joyful solemnity. evil. Yet in the days of Hezekiah, it

The calamities of the ensuing win had been prostituted to the purposes of ter and spring, in which the people suf- idolatry. He therefore wisely caused fered, in a severe season, the want of it to be destroyed. The greater part comfortable habitations, with a great of the corruptions of poperty had risen scarcity of provisions, which brought from the abuse of things, in themselves on a most desolating sickness, requir- harmless. When we consider the daned the exertion of all the wisdom and ger which was then resonably apprefirmness of the governor. By his un- hended of the re-establishment of poremitted attention to the wants of the pery ; when we consider the great insufferers, by his constant vigilance to fluence of sensible objects on the minds secure and promote the true interests of men, the intimate connection beof the colony, especially by his unsha- tween the use of sensible objects and ken confidence in God, he preserved the sentiments with which such obhis people from sinking under accu- jects have been connected ; when we mulated evils, and inspired them with consider the great difficulty which had a humble reliance on Him who was been found to eradicate the attachwith the church in the wilderness. In ment of the human mind from the June, 1630, the vessels began to ar. pompous pageantry of popish superstirive with the numerous company of tion, for which all good men had laadventurers which established the bored for a century, we shall find sufMassachusetts colony. Mr. Winthrop ficient reason to justify the conduct, now became the governor of the colo- land to admire the firmness of Mr. Enny, having been appointed by the pro- dicot in this decisive measure. When prietors in England, and Mr. Endicot Constantine erected the cross above was one of the Assistants. He contin- the imperial banner, it was done from ued in the place of assistant for sever- the best motives, and was attended al years, and was one of the most ac- with the most beneficial effects. But tive, vigilant, and influential magis- when the same sign had become an obtrates in the colony. He was even at ject of adoration and worship, instead the head of the Salem settlement, of the blessed person whom it bore, which, as it was the oldest, was one Luther, Zuinglius, Calvin, Beza, Cranof the most respectable towns in the mer, with all the venerable witnesses plantation.

of their time, contended for its remoIn the year 1634, Mr. Endicot, in the val from the place of worship. For capacity of a magistrate, caused the the same reason that we revere their sign of the cross to be cut out of the conduct, we shall justify that of Mr. king's colors, which were used as the Endicot. He was, however publicly public flag at Salem. He insisted that censured by the General Court for this this was a relic of ancient superstition, transaction, and, for one year, excluthat it was derived from the exploded ded from the magistracy. But this institutions of popery, and ought to be was done for the most obvious readiscarded. He claimed not that it was sons; that the government at home an evil in itself, but as an appendage might take no offence against the colof Romish superstition which all good ony. Still Mr. Endicot's opinion preinen in the nation, and, especially, the vailed; the soldiers refused to serve Puritans, were endeavoring to exter-, under a standard having the figure of minate, it ought not to be a devise of a cross, and by common consent it the public ensign.' He felt authorized was universally laid aside.

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