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deeper into the earth; that, ere he | palian, the Presbyterian, the Independwas called to render his account atant, and the religious of all denomina: the tribunal of his insulted Maker, ittions, whose jarring principles and inte. would extend its branches over the rests hand so long produced a mutualworld, and shed its leaves for the heal-ly repulsive alienation of heart, who ing of many heathen nations. Little should all at once, as by the attractive. did he imagine that, when the Age of virtue of some unseen magnet, feel Reason was sunk the waters of ob-themselves drawn into a friendly asso: livion, to rise no more, millions in ev- ciation, where, actuated by one spirit, ery land would sit and sing under its | they would combine to promote one shadow, and find the fruits thereof and the same object; if he had gone stil! sweet to their taste. The time when further, and ventured to predict, that, this revival took place renders it the within a few years after the establishmore astonishing, and the more clear-ment of this Society, the Scriptures ly displays the work of an Almighty would be translated into twelve Euro: hand-When an extensive trade and pean, and nine Oriental languages, and commerce, favorable to the views of that translations in twenty-four foreign Avarice and Ambition, had long en-languages would be going forward*, grossed the attention of mankind, and and that near two hundred thousand steeled the heart against religious im- copies of the Old, and near three hun. pressions;—when, in the bustle of bu-|| dred thousand copies of the New-Tessiuess, and the noise of riot-behindtament, would be dispersed, in the the counter, and around the convivial space of six years, by the efforts of this board—the still, small voice of Reli society, would he not have been deemgion was unheard or treated with in- ed a visionary and a madman? Would dignant scorn ;-when politics absorb- not a cell have been assigned him next æd every sentiment of another class, to that of the celebrated Brothers, of and the affairs of eternity were forgot famous memory? Yet all this has been ten;-amidst scepticism, atheism, and actually accomplished. Upon what crimes-monsters engendered in the principle? The principle of union and confusion of the French Revolution, co-operation. Yet some gentlemen of stalking abroad, and threatening the high respectability, it seems, object to destruction of every thing sacred :-a-"the society for this reason: It is com. mid the demolition of thrones, the dis- pounded, say they of different sects, all ruption of kingdoms, and the wailings of whose principles cannot be conform, of vations driven mad with despair: led to the standard of truth. This objecin this awful state of things, the happy tion wright, perhaps, have had some revolution in favor of Christianity, of force, if the object of the society had which we are now speaking, was ac- not been so simple in its nature, so accomplished. Then it was that the curately defined, and so strongly witnesses rose from the dead, glowing guarded. What is that object? The with immortal vigour: then was the dispersion of the authorised version of British and Foreign Bible Society in-li the Old and New Testament, without stituted to speed their progress, that note or comment. Every honest Christhey might deliver their testimony to tian believes his own system to be all nations before the end of the world. | founded upon the word of God; and Gentlemen, is this the work of man? | if different parties were to consult their Verily the finger of God is here! In private sentiments, each would issue the year of our Lord 1804, if any man By the aid of the Bible Society, the Sa. had ventured to predict, that an insti- cred Scriptures, either in the whole or in tution would soon be founded, under part, are at present translating, printing. or the patronagee of the mitre and the co- and dialects; whereof about twenty-five are sonet, with the sanction of genius and li- | translations into languag's in which the terature, comprehending the Episco- Scriptures have not been published before.

&c. were keen and severe satirists; of infinite wisdom ; in the judgment of but, in my opinion, most legal writings impartial reason, its divinity is estabtestisy the vices and villainy of the lished upon the basis of demonstration. world with a much sharper lash than | An eulogium on the Sacred Book their writings. A deed of sale, a mar- would be a wasteful excess. Who rige seitlement, or a bill and answer, would hold up a torch to enlighten the expose the dishonesty of the world meridian sun? If, then, the Bible be with such truth and seriousness, as in-l indeed the word of God, a revelation finitely exceed the most pointed wit. of infinite wisdom and benevolence, The vast length of such writings, the what object can be conceived of highpreciseness of every clause, the longer importance than its universal circustrings of synonimous words, &e. are,lation? It is the declared will of the it seems, all little enough to defend Great Parent of the universe, and clearjustice against the many and artful at- ly manifest, from all the contents of the tacks to be expected. There is in revelation with which he hath favored short, an universal corruption and de- mankind, that it was intended, not for pravity among mankind, arise it from local, but for general utility. Its records whence it will.” Such is the concur- are an authentic history of the gradual rent opinion and practice of mankiod. introduction and final accomplishment It plainly says, Every imagination of of redemption, in which people of all the thoughts of our hearts are only evil nations are interested. its prophecies continually-none are righteous, none lift up the vail of futurity, and exhibit doth good, no, not one.

to view an auspicious clay, when the

knowledge of the glory of the Lord Substance of a Speech delivered at the shall fill the whole earth. Its doctrines

Second Anniversary Meeling of the are adapted to relieve human misery Bristol Auxiliary Bible Society, Feb. in every form, and to heal all the dis13, 1812, by Rev. Mr. Thorp. eases of the moral world. Its precepts

SHRINKING, as I really do, under a impose a restraint upon the sensual sense of my own insignificance, no- and the malevolent passions; inculcate thing but an afelent attachment to the universal benevolence; and, extending cause for which we are assembled, their empire over the barriers which could have inspired confidence suffi-| divide political states, tend to unite all cient to enable me to deliver my sen- mankind, as one happy family, in bonds timents before an audience so truly of brotherly love. respectable. If by so doing I should But what I mean principally to inseein to obtrude upon your notice, let sist upon is, that the very style in which the feelings which Christianity awa- Scripture is written, clearly evinces kens in the heart of man at the contem- that it was designed, not for this or that plation of human wretchedness-let people exclusively; not for the Hethe consideration of the dark places brew or the Egyptian, the Greek or still to be found in half-enlightened Eu-| the Roman, the Asiatic or the Evroperope-let the deplorable state of whole an, but for man, in all ages, in all plaempires, entangled in the mazes of su-ces, of every colour and of every lanperstition and idolatry-and, above all, guage. Its style is such as is not to be let the grandeur of the attempt to res- found in the works of human compocue a perishing world from the bond-sition. It consists of figures borrowage of corruption, be admitted as my ed from all that is familiar, beautiful, apology.-Sir, I thank God that I now or sublime in nature; not merely as. speak, not to an infidel, but to a Chris-embelishments of diction, or in contian auditory. An attempt to vindi-formity to the custom of the Orientals, caie the truth of Scripture before ad but as signs and images of the spiritual a jsembly like this, is unnecessary. To and invisible realities of a spiritual and the enlightened eye, it presents the seal an invisible world. Words are arbi

trary, ambiguous, changeable; and the eminence. Ideas received by this speech of one people is unintelligible channel are the most clear and dis. jargon to another; but Nature is im- tinct: they find the readiest way to the mutable-her leading characteristics heart, and stamp the most lasting imare every where the same: and in the pression upon the memory. Such is style of the sacred writers, all the ob- the nature of that mysterious being jects of nature, in heaven, on eartb, called man, whether blackened by au and under the earth, form the ele-|| Afrić sun or shivering; upon the mounments of an universal language, which tains of Lapland. The savage and the can never be confounded, and in which courtier, the philosopher and the peaall nations have a common interest. sant, in this view, are cast in the same Gentlemen, may I claim your indulmould, and stand on the same level. gence one moment, while I amplify The Creator of man, is the author of this argument? All Scripture, if I mis-revelation. In this revelation he hath take not, rises in its support. The Cre. consulted the weakness and exigency ator of the world has always spoken to of human nature, and accommodated man in a language perfectly suited to the method of instruction to all the his constitution. Man consists of two avenues of the understanding and the componant parts--an immortal soul,|| heart. In conformity to the constituwhich advances him to an alliancetion of human nature, which is every with the world of spirits; and a perish- where the same, he employs a lanable body, which connects him with a ||guage, taken from things seen, wherematerial system, which, like himself, || by, exhibiting to our eyes the images is hastening to dissolution. The first of things spiritual, he gives a kind of objects which draw his attention, are visibility to objects in themselves invithe objects of his senses ; and he is ob-sible. This he does, not only that he viously so formed as to receive his in-may convey to us some notices of himstruction (for man is a creature of in-self, and of the invisible world, but, alstruction) through the medium of sen-|| so, that thereby the things unseen may sation. Hence sensible images neces- reach our hearts with a full conviction sarily form the basis of all the know-||of their reality, and that the world to ledge which he is capable of acquir-come may be a powerful rival in our ing, whether as an inhabitant of this affections to the world that now is.--world or a candidate for eternal happi- | It would be casy to multiply examples

But man is not formed merely to elucidate and confirm these observfor contemplation; he is a moral agentations. The difficulty is to make a - he is accountable for his actions to a proper selection. The sun ruling the Divine tribunal. Passions are implant- day, and the moon and stars governing ed in his nature for the inost benevo. the night; the outgoings of the mornlent purposes; and it is essential to his ing and of the evening; the seasons of well-being, that he be united, by su- the year, from the beginning of winter, preme love, to the Greatest of all be- onward to the close of the harvest; the ings and the Source of all happiness. power and operations of the elements, Thus fearfully and wonderfully made, in all their varied förms; the mould not only the understanding but the that covers, with the vegetable proheart of man is most accessible by the ductions that adorn the surface, and avenues of sense. Nothing makes so the treasures which are deposited in deep an impression upon his mind as the caverns of the globe; the inhabithat which first affects his bodily sensa- tants of the air, the ocean, and the tions. The senses, however, are not land-all are pressed into the service all qualified alike for admitting such of the sanctuary; all furnish their croinopressions. By the ear, indeed, we ta of that imagery of wbich the style receive much of our knowledge; yet of the sacred writers is composed.-the eye, in this respect, has the pre-Thus adapted and intended for genera"

ness.

circulation, when the Bible (as it short-| from the dead, no more to prophesy in ly will be by the efforts of this society sackcloth, but in the garments of joux and others) is translated into every lan- and immortality. The return of vial guage and sent to every nation, its inotion was soon felt in our much-loved doctrines will be found to correspond country--the allmonitions of these miwith the characteristics of nature which nisters were again heard as the voice the hand of God hath sketched and of God-their message was again rehung out in the system around us;--garded as a message from Heavenand an eternal world will be laid open they were received with the welcome to the inhabitants, by means of images of friends recovered from the tombtaken from things with which they they rose to honor and dignity in the lave been long familiarly acquainted presence of their enemies--they enter, Wherever the sacred volume is sent, ed, says the prophet, into the cloud, the man is the pupil-nature is his school, symbol of the Divine protection, while, and prophets and apostles are his in- in the mean time, a society was formstructors. This book contains two es-ing, combining the energies of a great sential parts, the Old and the New mpire, to accelerate their speed Testament. Whether, as some of our through the world, that they may ablest commentatorş suppose, these prophesy to multitudes, and to peo are the two witnesses spoken in the A-ple, and to tongues, and to nations, pocalypse, I presume not to determine; How rapid has been their flight?but certainly, the predictions of the How extensive is their range! What prophet have been remarkably vere- millions, within these few years, have fied in the fate of the Holy Scriptures. received their testimony, who before These witnesses prophesied in sack-had not heard a Saviour's name, or cloth during the continuance of the seen his glory! How simple, and yet dark ages, and the whole reign of po-how effective, the means by which the регу. They received a fatal wound whole has been brought to pass ! This from the society, proudly styling itself is the Lord's doing, and it is marvelthe illuminated ; and expired, with lous in our eyes. Gentlemen, how convulsive throes, in the chaos of the dark would this world be if there were French Revolution. Their bodies, as, no prophets to enlightep it! But when the prophet had foretold, lay unburi- a man turns prophet, without his creed, but the vital principle was extioct. dentials, we inay safely pronounce him The mortality was felt, not only on the an impostor, or an enthusiast. David continent, but in this favored island.- Hume prophesied that, at the concluGentlemen, we remember those days, ' sion of the last, or the beginning of this and we tremble at the recollection-century, Christianity would be exterInfidelity distilled ils fatal poison, in the minated from the earth. The transacparoxysm of the political mania which tions of this day give the lie to his prehad infected all Europe; infidels let fall diction. Another prophet of infidelity the mask, and avowed their principles; boasted that (to use his own languge)he pominal Christians abandoned their had cut down every tree in the spiritual standard, and joined the forces of the Eden. Priests, says he, may stick them enemy; real Christians, supine and ti- in the ground again, but they will never mid became almost ashamed of their take root. Foolish man! why didst religion, and afraid to advocate its thou not pluck them up by the roots ? cause; and wherever the tree of liber- Art thou ignorant that there is hope of ty was planted, a cross was set up, to ja tree, if it be cut down, that it will which Christianity was nailed, while sprout again, and through the scent of her friends stood at a distance and water, bring forth boughs like a plant ? looked on with apparent indifference. Little did that vain mortal imagine But after three days and a half, a short that the tree of life, the glory of para-ut terrible interval, the witnesses rose dise, was at that time striking its reots

1

deeper into the earth ; that, ere he i palian, the Presbyterian, the Independ was called to render his account atant, and the religious of all denominathe tribunal of his insulted Maker, it tions, whose jarring principles and inte. would extend its branches over the rests hand so long produced a mutualworld, and shed its leaves for the heal-ly repulsive alienation of heart, who ing of many heathen nations. Little should all at once, as by the attractive. alid he imagine that, when the Age of virtue of some unseen magvet, feel Reason was sunk in the waters of ob- themselves drawn into a friendly assolivion, to rise no more, millions in ev- ciation, where, actuated by one spirit, ery land would sit and sing under its they would combine to promote one shadow, and find the fruits thereof and the same object; if he had gone still sweet to their taste. The time when further, and ventured to predict, that, this revival took place renders it the within a few years after the establishmore astonishing, and the more clear-ment of this Society, the Scriptures ly displays the work of an Almighty would be translated into twelve Euro hand-When an extensive trade and pean, and nine Oriental languages, and commerce, favorable to the views of that translations in twenty-four foreign Avarice and Ambition, had long en-languages would be going forward*, grossed the attention of mankind, and and that near two hundred thousand steeled the heart against religious im- copies of the Old, and near three hunpressions;—when, in the bustle of bu- dred thousand copies of the New-Tes siuess, and the noise of riot-behindtament, would be dispersed, in the the counter, and around the convivial space of six years, by the efforts of this board—the still, small voice of Reli-society, would he not have been deemgion was unheard or treated with in-li ed a visionary and a madman? Would dignant scorn ;—when politics absorb- not a cell have been assigned him next ed every sentiment of another class, to that of the celebrated Brothers, of and the affairs of eternity were forgot famous memory? Yet all this has been ten;-amidst scepticism, atheism, and actually accomplished. Upon what crimes-monsters engendered in the principle? The principle of union and confusion of the French Revolution, co-operation. Yet some gentlemen of stalking abroad, and threatening the high respectability, it seems, object ta destruction of every thing sacred :a- the society for this reason: It is com: mid the demolition of thrones, the dis-lipounded, say they of different sects, all ruption of kingdoms, and the wailings of whose principles cannot be conform, of nations driven mad with despair: led to the standard of truth. This objecin this awful state of things, the happy tion wight, perhaps, have had some revolution in favor of Christianity, of force, if the object of the society had which we are now speaking, was ac- not been so simple in its nature, so ac: complished. Then it was that the curately defined, and so strongly witnesses rose from the dead, glowing| guarded. What is that object? The with immortal vigour: then was the dispersion of the authorised version of British and Foreign Bible Society in-lithe Old and New Testament, without stituted to speed their progress, that note or comment. Every honest Christhey might deliver their testimony to tian believes his own system to be all nations before the end of the world. | founded upon the word of God; and Gentlemen, is this the work of man? ||if different parties were to consult their Verily the finger of God is here! In private sentiments, each would issue the year of our Lord 1804, if any man By the aid of the Bible Society, the Sa. had ventured to predict, that an insti- cred Scriptures, either in the whole or in tution would soon be founded, under part, are at present translating, printing. or the patronagee of the mitre and the co- and dialects; whereof about twenty-five are

circulating in fifty-eight different languages fonet, with the sanction of genius and li- translations into languages in which the terature, comprehending the Episco- Scriptures have not been published before.

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