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saw her

“ You ought to love and serve him. I desire 66 to hear and learn. He went to see and hear; " i. e. he went to see, and he went to hear.”

In which last instances there is not only an ellipsis of the governing verb, but likewise of the sign of the infinitive mode which is govern. ed by it.

And here it may not be amiss to observe, that' some verbs, through custom at least, seem to require the ellipsis of this sign.

I bid you rise and go. He made me go 66 and do it. I heard him curse and swear. I

go
that

way. You need not speak. 66 Would you

have me call ?” In all which instances the sign of the insinitive mode would be improper. THE ELLIPSIS OF THE ADVERB, PREPOSITION,

CONJUNCTION, AND INTERJECTION. 66 Hespake and acted wisely. They sing and

play most delightfully. She soon found and " acknowledged her mistake. Thrice I went " and offered my service;" that is, Thrice I

went, and thrice I offered my service.”
“ They confess the power, wisdom, good-
ness, and love of their Creatcr; i. e. the
power, and wisdom and goodness and love."

« May I speak of power, wisdom, good. "ness, truth?”

The entire ellipsis of the conjunction, as in the last instance, occurs but seldom: in some particular cases, however, it may have its propriety

6. Though I love, I do not adore him. “ Though he went up, he could see nothing ; “ i. e. though I love him, yet I do not adore

66 him."

“ I desire you would come to me. He said “ he would do it; i. e. he said that he would

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These conjunctions may be sometimes omit. ted; but for the most part, it is much better to express them.

There are several parts of correspondent conjunctions, or such as answer to each other in the construction of a sentence, which should be carefully observed, and perhaps never suppressed.

That answering to so. “ It is so obvious that 6 I need not mention it.”

As answering to so. “The city of Bristol “ is not near so large as that of London."

So answering to as. - As is the priest, so " are the people.”

As answering to as. “She is as tall as you."

Nor answering to neither. 66 Neither the 66

one nor the other." Or answering to either. Either this man or that man." Or answering to whether. " Whether it were I or you.”

Yet answering to though or although. Though she was young; yet she was not handsome.”

PREPOSITIONS ARE OFTEN SUPPRESSED.

" He went into the churches, halls, and pub. “ lic buildings: through the streets and lanes 66 of the city: he spake to every gentleman 66 and lady of the place; i. e. to every gen. 66 tleman and to every lady.” " I did him a kindness. IIe brought me the

She

gave him the letters ; i. e. she gave to him the letters."

The ellipsis of the interjection is not very common,

“O pity and shame!"--Milton.

news.

EXAMPLES OF THE ELLIPSIS.

“ If good manners will not justify my long 6 silence, policy, at least, will. And you

must confess, there is some prudence in not own. “ ing a debt one is incapable of paying."

If good manners will not justify my long silènice, policy, at least, will, justify it. And you must confess, that, there is some prudence in not owning a debt, which, one is incapable of paying.-- Fitzosborne's Letters.

“ He will often argue, that if this part of our trade were well cultivated, we should

gain from one nation; and if another, from 66 another."

He will often argue, that if this part of our trade were well cultivated, we should gain from one nation; and if another, part of our trade were well cultivated, we should gain, from ano. ther, nation.--Addison's Spect.

“ Could the painter have made a picture of “ me, capable of your conversation, I should 66 have sat to him with more delight than ever " I did to any thing in my

life.” Could the painter have made a picture of me, which could have been, capable of your conver.

sation, I should have sat to him with more de. light than ever I did, sit, to any thing in my life.--Mr. Locke to Mr Molyneux.

A few instances in which perhaps all possi. ble elliptical words are supplied.

“ You must renounce the conversation of “ your friends, and every civil duty of life, to “ be concealed in gloomy and unprofitable 66 solitude."

You must renounce the conversation of your friends, and, you must renounce, every civil duty of life, to be concealed in gloomy, soli. tude, and, you must renounce the conversation of your friends, and you must renounce every civil duty in life, to be concealed in, unprofitable solitude.Fitzosborne's Letters.

66 When a man is thoroughly persuaded that 6 he ought neither to admire, wish for, or pur. "sue any thing but what is actually his duty ; 66 it is not in the power of seasons, persons,

or accidents, to diminish his value.”

When a man is thoroughly persuaded that he ought neither to.admire any thing but what is actually his duty to udmire, and when a man is thoroughly persuaded that he ought neither to wish for any thing but what is actually his

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