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PERFECT AND PLUPERFECT TENSES.

PLURAL.

81. SING. 1. I must, might, would, ,1. We must, might, could, or should have been would, could, or should

have been 2. Thou must, mightest, 2. Ye or you must, wouldest, couldest, or might, would, could, or shouldest have been should have been

3. He must, might, 3. They' must, might, would, could, or should would, could, or should have been

have been

82. The future tense, in this mode, is best expressed by the present: as, I may be tda morrow.

83. The subjunctive form of this verb is thus distinguished:

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INFINITIVE MODE. 84. Present, to be ; perfect, to have been; future, about to be.

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85. The declension of a passive verb is form, ed by adding the participle passive to each person of the preceding verb, to be: as,

PRESENT TENSE.

SING. 1. I am loved

2. Thou art loved, or you are loved

3. He is loved

PLURAL.
1. We are loved
2. Ye or you are ļoved

3. They are loved, &c.

86. The verb has two original tenses, the present and the past; and two participles, the one active, and the other passive.

87. The active participle of all verbs what. erer ends in ing; as, loring, teaching.

88. The passive participle and past tense of all regular verbs are exactly the same: as, love, loved; ask, asked.

89. All regular Terbs, ending with an c, form their past tense and passive participle by the addition of d only: as, love, loved; receive, received. And all the verbs, whether regular or irregular, which end with an e, omit that e in the active participle: as, love, loving ; give, giving,

90. All regular verbs, ending with a con. sonant, or with a double consonant, form their past tense and passive participle by adding ed to the primitive word: as, remain, remained; long, longeil. And the active participle of all sich verbs is formed by the addition of ing: as, remain, remaining ; long, longing.

91. Such verbs, however, as end in ck, f, py sh, ss, and x, form, in general, the past tense and passive participle in t as well as ed: as, check, checked or checkt; puff, puffed or puft; soap, snapped, or snapt; mesh, meshed, or mesht; bless, blessed, or blest; mix, mixed, or mixt: one of the consonants being dropped when the verb ends with two consonants of the same kind; or, when ending with a single consonant, it doubles it in the past tense: as bless, blessed, blest; snap, snapped, snapt.

92. Verbs that end in y with a vowel before it, are completely regular, and form their past tense and passive participle by the addition of ed:as, obey, obeyed; decoy, decoyed: buy, say, slay, and a few other irregular verbs, being excepted. But if there be a consonant before the y, then the past tense with the passive participle, and the second and third persons of the present tense, change they into i : as, deny, deIried, thou deniest, he denieth or denies. But the active participle of all verbs ending in y is formed by an addition of ing: as, obey, obeying; buy, buying; deny, denying.

93. There are several verbs, which, though regular as to their general formation, yet double their final consonant in the past tense and both participles : as, sup, supped, supping ; worship, worshipped, worshipping.

94. There are also many verbs, irregular in their past tense and passive participle, which yet double their final consonant in the active participle: as, begin, beginning; run, running.

95. All, regular verbs, which double their final consonant in the past tense and passive participle, double it also in the active participles, and the contrary; as, blot, blotted, blotting. And all vorbs without exception, which double the final consonantin the active participle, double that consonant also in the second and third persons of the present tense: as, worship, wor.. shipping, thou worshippest, he worshippeth, or worships; begin, beginning, thou beginnest, he beginneth, or begins.

96. Here follows a catalogue of the simple verbs which double their final consonant in the

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past tense and both participles, together with such irregular verbs as double their final con. sonant in the active participle. Abet, abetted Bowel, bowelled Abhor, abhorred Brag, bragged Abut, abutted

Brim, brimmed Acquit, acquitted Bud, budded Admit, admitted Cabal, caballed Allot, allotted Cancel, cancelled Amit, amitted Cap, capped Annul, annulled Capot, capotted Appal, appalled Carol, carolled Apparel, apparelled Cavil, cavilled Avel, avelled Channel, channelled Aver, averred Chap, chapped Bag, bagged

Char, charred Bam, bainmed

Chat, chatted Ban, banned Chip, chipped Bar, barred

Chisel, chiselled Parrel, barrelled Chit, chitted Bed, bedded

Chop, chopped Befal, befalling Clap, clapped Beg, begged

Clip, clipped Begin, beginning Clod, clodded Bet, betted

Clog, clogged Bethral, bethralled Clot, clotted Bias, biassed

Club, clubbed Bib, bibbed

Cod, codded
Bid, bidding

Cog, cogged
Blab, blabbing Commit, committed
Blot, blotted Compel, compelled
Blur, blurred Con, conned
Bob, bobbed Concur, concurred

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