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nour shall cause the officer or person for whom he acts to lose his office. - Philips. To DEQUA’NT ITATE. v. a. s from de and quantitas, Latin.) To diminish the quantity of. This we affirm of pure gold; for that which is current, and passeth in stamp amongst us, by reason of its allay, which is a proportion of silver or copper mixed therewith, is actually deyuantitated by fire, and possibly by frequent extinction. Brown's Pulgar Erroars. DER. A term used in the beginning of names of places. It is generally to be derived from b&on, a wild beast: unless the place stands upon a river; for then it may rather be fetched from the British dur, i. e. water. Gibson's Camden,

To DERA’c.1N AT E. v. a. ideraciner, Fr.] 1. To pluck or tear up by the roots. Her fallow leas . The darnei, hemlock, and rank fumitory, Doth root upon; while that the cult: rusts That shootid ger-cinite such savagery. . Soaks. 2. To abolish; to destroy ; to extirpate. To DERAIGN. v. a. siliorationare, or 12 DERA’IN. dirationare, Latin.] 1. To prove; to justify. When the parson of any church is disturbed to demand tythes in the next parish by a writ of indicawit, the patron shall have a writ to demand the advowson of the tythes being in demand: and when it is deraigned, then shall the plea Pass in the court christian, as far forth as it is deraigned in the king's court. Blount. 2. To disorder; to turn out of course. - Dict. "I GN MENT. B::::::. E. N.T. } n. . [from deraign.] 1. The act of deraigning or proving. 2. A disordering or turning out of course. 3. A discharge of profession; a departure out of religion. In some places the substantive deraignment is used in the very literal signification with the French disrayer, or dorranger: that is, turning out of course, displacing, or setting out of order; as, deraignment or departure out of religion, and deraignment or discharge of their profession, j is spoken of those religious men who forsook their orders and professions. Blount. DE RA’y. m. s. [from desrayer, French, to turn out of the right way.] 1. Tumult; disorder; noise. . 2. Merriment; joltity; solemnity. Not in use. Dooglass.

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Obsolete. Some think that in the example it means daring. So from immortal race he does proceed, That mortal hands may not withstand his might; Dred for his derring doe, and bloody deed ; For au in blood and spoil is his delight. A 24*; DERE Locrio N. m.s. Lderelictio, Latin.] 1. The act of forsaking or leaving; abandonment. 2. The state of being forsaken. There is no other thing to be locked for, but the effects of God's most just displeasure; the withdrawing of grace, or:liction in this world, and in the world to come confusion. Hoor. Doe Elic Is, n. 1. pl. [In law.] Goods

wilfully thrown away, or relinquished, by the owner. Dict. To DERI'DE. v. a. [derideo, Lat.] To laugh at ; to mock; to turn to ridicule; to scorn. Before such presence to offend with any the least unseemliness, we would be surely as loth as they who most reprehend or deride what we do. coker. What shall be the portion of those who have Aderided God's word, and made a mock of every thing that is sacred and religious? Tillotson. These sons, ye gods, who with flagitious pride Insult my darkness, and my groans deride. p: Some, that adore Newton for his fluxions, deride him for his religion. , , Berkly. DE R1'd E.R. m. s. [from the verb.] 1. A mocker; a scofier. Upon the wilful violation of oaths, execrable blasphemies, and like contempts offered by deriders of religion, fearful tokens of divine revenge have been known to follow. Hooker. 2. A droll; a buffoon. Dr R I's so N. m. s. [derijio, Latin.] 1. The act of deriding or laughing at. Are we grieved with the scorn and derision of the profane Thus was the blessed Jesus despised and o of men. Afogers. Vanity is the natural weakness of an ambitious man, which exposes him to the secret scorn and derision of those he converses with. Addis. 2. Conteinpt; scorn; a laughingstock. I am in derision daily; every one mocketh me. - jeremiah. Thou makest us a reproach to our neighbours, a scorn and a derision to them that are round about us. Praims. Ensnar'd, assaulted, overcome : led bound, Thy foes derision, captive, poor, and blind; Into a dungeon thrust. Milton. DE R1's 1 v E. adj. [from deride.j Mocking; scoffin i O'er all the dome they quaff, they feast; Derisive taunts were spread from guest to guest, And each in jovial mood his mate address'd. Pope. DER1's or Y. adj. [deritorius, Lat.] Mocking; ridiculing. DE R1'v AB 1. E. adj. [from derive..] Attainable by right of descent or derivation. ... God has declared this the eternal rule and standard of all honour derivable upon men, that those who honour him shall be honoured by him. South. DER I v A't Ion. n. 4. [derivatio, Latin.] 1. A draining of water; a turning of its course, When the water began to swell, it would every way discharge itself by any descents or declivities of the ground; and these issues and derivations being once made, and supplied with new waters pushing them forwards, would continue their course till they arrived at the sea, just as other rivers do. - Burnet. 2. [In grammar.] The tracing of a word from its original. Your lordship here seems to dislike my taking notice that the derivation of the word Substan-e favours the idea we have of it; and your lordship tells me, that very little weight is to be laid - on it, on a bare grammatical etymology. Locke. 3. The transmission of anything from it; , source. -, -. As touching traditional communication, and tradition of those truths that I call connatural and engraven, I do not doubt but many of those truths have had the help of that derivation. Hale. 4. In medicine.] The drawing of a humour from one part of the body to another. Derivation differs from revulsion only in the measure of the distance, and the force of the Inedicines used: if we draw it to sorme very remote, or, it may be, contrary part, we call that revulsion; if only to some neighbouring place, and by gentle means, we call it derivation. Wiseman. s. The thing deduced or derived. Not used. Most of them are the genuine derivations of the hypothesis they claim to. Glanville, I} E R row A rive. adj. [derivativus, Latin.] Derived or taken from another. As it is a derivative perfection, so it is a distinct kind of perfection from that which is in Go!. - Hair. Dr R1'v Ativ E. n.s.. [from the adjective.] The thing or word derived or taken from another. - For honour, *T is a derivative from me to mine, And only that I stand for. Shakspeare. The word Honestus originally and strictly signifies no more than creditable ; and is but a derivative from Honor, which signifies credit or honour. South. Dr Rivatively. adv. [from derivative..] In a derivative manner.

To DERIVE. v. a. [deriver, Fr. from derivo, Latin.] -- 1. To turn the course of water from its , channel. - Compiny lessens the shame of vice by sharing /it, and abases the torrent of a common cdium b deriving it into many channels. South. 2. To deduce; as from a root, from a cause, from a principle. They endeavour to derive the varieties of colours from the varicus proportion of the direct progress or motion of these globules to their cir&umvolution, or motion about their own o: - - - - ****. Men derive their ideas of duration from their reflection on the train of ideas, they observe to socceed one another in their own understandings. - + ... • - I. :le. from these two causes of the laxity and rigidity of the fibres, the methodists, an ancient set of physicians, derived all diseases of ho bodie; with a great deal of reason; for the fluids de... their qualities from the solids. -loot. 3. To cominunicate to another, as from the origin and source. Christ having Adam's nature as we have, but incorrupt, oriveté not nature, but incorruption, and that immediately from his own person, unto all that belong unto him. . . . . Joker. 4. To receive by transmission. • * , This property seems rather to have boos orived from the pretorian soldiers. Decay of Piety. The censors of these wretches, who, I am sure, could derive no sanctity to them from their own coons; yet upon this, account, that they had on consecrated by the offering incense in them; were, by God's special command, sequestered from all common use. . . South. 3. To communicate to by descent of blood. ' 'Besides the readiness, of parts, an excellent disposition of mind is derived to your lordshi from the parents of two generations, to whom have the honour to be known. Jokon,

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DE R N IE’R. ad;. Last. It is a mere Fretch word, and used only in the following phrase. In the Imperial Chamber, the term for the prosecution of an appeal is not circumscribedo the term of one or two years, as the law cowhere requires in the empire; this being the dernier resort and supreme court of judici - - Ayoff: To De'Rog at E. v. a. [derogo, Latin.] 1. To do an act so far contrary to a law or custom, as to diminish its former extent: distinguished from abrogate. . By several contrary customs and stiles to here, many of those civil and canon law: it controuled and derogated. - Ho. 2. To lessen the worth of any person thing; to disparage. To DE’R O GATE. v. 7. 1. To detract; to lessen reputation: with * front. * * - - . . . We should be injurious to virtue itself, if we did, derogate from them whom their indo' hath made great. . . . H 2. To degenerate; to act beneath our' rank, or place, or birth. * * Is there no derogation in 'to —You cannot derogate, my lord.

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any person or thing. Sometimes with to, properly with from. ich, though never so necessary, they could not easily now admit, without some fear of deregation from their credit; and therefore that which once they had done, they became for ever after resolute to maintain. Hooker. So surely he is a very brave man, neither is that anything which I speak to his derogation; for in that I said he is a mingled people, it is no dispraise. Spenser on Ireland. #. wisest princes need not think it any diminution to their greatness, or derogation to their sufficiency, to rely upon counsel. room. I say not this in derogation to Virgil, neither do I contradict any thing which I have formerly said in his just praise. Dryden. None of these patriots will think it a derogation from their merit, to have it said, that they received many lights and advantages from their intimacy with my lord Somers. Addison. Dr. Ro'o AT 1 v E. adi. Laterogativus, Lat.] Detracting ; lessening the honour of. INot in use. That spirits are corporeal, seems to me a conceit derogative to himself, and such as he should rather labour to overthrow; yet thereby he establisheth the doctrine of lustrations, amulets, and charms. Brown's Pulgar Errours. DER o'GA to R11. Y. adv. [from derogatory.] In a detracting manner. Dict. DER O'GA To R1 N Ess. n. 4. [from derogatory..] The act of derogating. Dict. DE Roog A To R Y. adj. [derogatorius, Lat.] Detractious; that lessens the honour of ; dishonourable. They live and die in their absurdities; passing their days in perverted apprehensions and conceptions of the world, derogatory unto God, and the wisdom of the creation. Brown. These deputed beings are derogatory from the wisdom and power of the Author of Nature; who doubtless can govern this machine he could create, by more direct and easy methods than employing these subservient divinities. Cheyne. DE’R v i s. n. J. Ldervis, French..] A Turkish priest, or monk. Even there, where Christ vouchsaf'd to teach, Their dervise dare an impostor preach. Sandy. The dervis at first made some scruple of violating his promise to the dying brachman; but told him, at last, that he could conceal nothing from so excellent a prince. Spectator. DE"SCANT, n. s. Ldiscanto, Italian. 1. A song or tune composed in parts. Nay, now you are too flat, And mar the concord with too harsh a descant. Shakspeare. The wakeful nightingale All night long her amorous descant sung. Milt. 2. A discourse; a disputation; a disquisition branched out into several divisions or heads. It is commonly used as a word of censure or contempt. Look you get a prayer-book in your hand, And stañd between two churchmen, good my

ord: For on that ground I'll build a holy derrant. Shakspeare. Kindness would supplant our unkind reportings, and severe dricant, upon our brethren. Government of the Tongue. To Dr.'sc A NT. v. n. [from the noun.] 1. To sing in parts. 2. To discourseat large; to makespeeches: in a sense of censure or contempt.

Why I, in this weak piping time of peace, Have no delight to pass away the time, Unless to spy my shadow in the sun, And dercant on mine own deformity. Shake. Com'st thou for this, vain boaster,to survey me; To descant on my strength, and give thy verdict f Milton. A virtuous man should be pleased to find people descanting upon his actions; because, when they are thoroughly canvassed and examined, they turn to his honour. Addison. To DESCE/ND. v. n. [descendo, Lat.] 1. To go downward ; to come from a higher place to a lower: to fall; to sink. he rain descended, and the floods came, and the winds blew, and beat upon that house; and it fell not, for it was founded upon a rock. Matthew. The brook that descended out of the mount. Deuteronomy. He cleft his head with one descending blow. - Dryden. Foul with stains Of gushing torrents and descending rains. Addi, O goddess! who, descending from the skies, Vouchsaf'd thy presence to my wond ring eyes. - ope. 2. To come down, in a popular sense, implying only an arrival at one place from another. He shall descend into battle, and perish. 1 Sam. 3. To come suddenly or violently; to fall upon as from an eminence. For the pious sire preserve the son; His wish'd return with happy pow'r befriend, And on the suitors let thy wrath descend. Pope. 4. To go down, in a figurative sense. He, with honest meditations fed, Into himself descended. 5. To make an invasion. . . The goddess gives th' alarm; and soon is known The Grecian fleet descending on the town. Dry. A foreign son upon the shore descend, Whose martial fame from pole to pole extends. 19ryden. 6. To proceed as from an original; to be derived from. Despair descends from a mean original; the offspring of fear, laziness, and impatience. Collier against Depair. Will is younger brother to a baronet, and descended of the ancient family of the Wimbles. Addison. 7. To fall in order of inheritance to a Successour. Should we allow that all the property, all the estate, of the father ought to des, and to the eldest son; yet the father's natural dominion, the paternal power, cannot descend unto him by inheritance, locłe. The inheritance of both rule over men, and property in things, prung from the same original, and were to one by the same rules. Looke. Our author provideo for the droending and conveyance down of Adam's monarchical power to posterity, by the inheritance of his heir, succeeding to his father's authority. Locke. 8. To extend a discourse from general to particular considerations. Congregations discerned the small accord that was among themselves, when they do...or d to particulars. 19-3, y Piety. To D Esce’N D. o. a. To walk downward upon any place. -He endo, and they boh & oth to Descended Adan, t. to be so wor: }; - ?* Lay slee; ong, A soon.

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descending it, were not it made up of a loose crumbled earth. Addison. D'Esco's D As T. n.s. (descendant, French; descendens, Latin.] The offspring of an ancestor; he that is in the line of generation, at whatever distance. The descendants of Neptune were planted there. Bacon.

To the descent and dust below thy see. &#. 5. Fall from a higher state ; degradition. O foul dercent / that I, who erst croWith gods to sit the highest, am row toroi Into a beast, and mix with bestial slime This essence to incarnate and in brute. Moe. 6. Invasion; hostile entrance into a kit; dom: in allusion to the he'ght of ship. At the first coercent on shore, he wis not inmured with a wooden vessel, but he did routenance the landing in his long-boat. Wito. The duke was general himself; and made for unfortunate descent upon the Isle of Rhee, who was attended with a miserable retreat, in who the flower of the army was lost. Ciaros. Arise, true judges, in your own defence, Controul those foolings, and declare for serie; For, should the fools prevail, they stor notho, But make their next descent upon the fir. Do 7. Transmission of anything by succession and inheritance. . If the agreement and consent of men frogs: a sceptre into anyone's hand, that also mus:rect its descent and conveyance. 8. The state of proceeding nal or progenitor. All of them, even without such a particular claim, had great reason to glory in their comma descent from Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob, to who the promise of the blessed seed was severily made. Attorhy, 9. Birth ; extraction; process of lineage. I give my voice on Richard's side, To bar my master's heirs in true descent! God knows, I will not do it. skipor, Turnus, for high descent and graceful mieh, Was first, and favour’d by the Latian ‘.

O, true descendant of a patrict line, Vouchsafe this picture of thy soul to see. Dryd. He revealed his own will, and their duty, in a more ample manner than it had been declared to any of my descendants before them. Atterbury. Desce's D # N r. adj. Laescendens, Latin. It seems to be established, that the substantive should derive the termination from the French, and the adjective from the Latin.] 1. Falling; sinking; coming down; descending. There is a regress of the sap in plants, from above downwards; and this descendent juice is that which principally nourishes both fruit and plant. Ray on the Creation. 2. Proceeding from another, as an original or ancestor. More than mortal grace Speaks thee descendent of ethereal race. Desch’N D1 B 1 E. a.o. (from descend.] 1. Such as may be descended ; such as may admit of a passage downward. 2. Transmissible by inheritance. According to the customs of other countries, those honorary fees and infeudations were de

scendible to the eldest, and not to all the males. Hale's Common Law of England.

DEscF'N S10 N. m. s. [descensio, Latin.] 1. The act of going downward, falling, or sinking ; descent. 2. A declension ; a degradation. From a god to a bull! a heavy descension : it was Jove's case. From a prince to a 'prentice! a low transformation: that shall be mine. Shatspeare. 3. [In astronomy..] Right descension is the arch of the equator, which descends with the sign or star below the horizon of a direct sphere. Oblique descension is the arch of the equator, which descends with the sign below the horizon of an oblique sphere. - Ozanam." If scr'N's to N A : . adi. [from descension.] Relating to descent. D'Esc E'N'I. n.s.[descensus, Latin; descente, French.] 1. The act of passing from a higher to a lower place. Why do fragments from a mountain rent,

Tend to the earth with such a swift descent * ..Blackmore.

from an origi:

Pope.

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Qaro, 12. A rank in the scale of subordinatics. How have I then with whom to held to verse,

Save with the creatures which I made, and this To me inferior 2 infinite descents Beneath what other creatures are to thee. Mo

To DESCRIBE. v. a. [describe, Lat]

1. To delineate; to mark out; to to: as, a torch waved about the head descrio a circle.

2. Progress downward. 2. To mark out any thing by the mention

Observing, such gradual and gentle descents downwards, in those parts of the creation that are beneath men, the rule of analogy may make it probable that it is so also in things *;

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He that writes well in verse will often send his thoughts in search through all the treasure of words that express any one idea in the same language; that so he may comport with the measures or the rhyme, or with his own most beautiful and vivid sentiments of the thing he describer. Watts. 3. To distribute into proper heads or divisions. Men passed through the land, and described it by cities into seven parts in a book. Joshua. 4. To define in a lax manner by the promiscuous mention of qualities general and peculiar. See DEs cA IPT los. Descri’B E. R. m. s. [from describe..] He that describes. From a plantation and colony, an island near Spain was by the Greek describers named Frythra. Brown. Desc R1’E R. m. . [from the verb.] A discoverer; a detecter. The glad descrier shall not miss To taste the nectar of a kiss. Crashaw.

Descri’Prio N. m. s. | descriptio, Lat.] 1. The act of delineating or expressing any person or thing by perceptible properties. 2. The sentence or passage in which any thing is described. A poet must refuse all tedious and unnecessary descriptions: a robe which is too heavy, is less an ornament than a burthen, Dryden. Sometimes, misguided by the tuneful thiong, I loek for streams immortaliz'd in song, That lost in silence and oblivion lie ; Dumb are their fountains, and their channels dry, That . for ever by the muse's skill, And in the smcoth description murmur still. 4adison.

3. A lax definition. The sort of deition, which is made up of a mere collection of the most remarkable parts or Properties, is called an imperfect definition, or,a description; whereas the definition is called perfect, when it is composed of the essential difference, added to general nature or genus. Watts. 4. The qualities expressed in a description. I'll pay six thousand, and deface the bond, Before a friend of this description Shall lose a hair. Shakspeare. To DESCRY', 'v. a. [descrier, Fr.] 1. To give notice of any thing suddenly discovered : as, the Scout descried the enemy, or gave notice of their approach. This sense is now obsolete, but gave occasion to those which are now in use. 2. To spy out; to examine at a distance. And the house of Joseph sent to descry o - was coEdmund, I think, is gone to descry. judg The strength o' th' enemy. Shai peare. Our merchants, to their great charges, set forth fleets to descry the seas. Abbot. 3. To detect ; to find out any thing concealed. of the king they got a sight after dinner in a gallery, and of the queen mother at her own table: in neither place descried; no, not by Cadinet, who had been lately ambassador in England. Wotton. 4. To discover ; to perceive by the eye; to see anything distant or obscure.

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behorned, as the moon seems. Rolleigh. And now their way to earth they had descrid, T. Paradise first tending. AMilton.

Although the motion of light be not arseriod, nourgument can be made from thence to prove tha light is not a body. 10ig 4 tow'r so high, it seem'd to reach the sky, Stod on the roof, from whence we could descry

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ver; thing discovered. How near's the other army? -Nar, and on speedy foot; the main destry Stans in the hourly à. Shakspeare. To DESECRATE. v. a. [desacre, Lat.] To divert from the purpose to which anything is consecrated. he founders of monasteries imprecated evil on tose who should desecrate their donations. Salmon's Survey. DESERA’rro N. m. s. [from desecrate.] Thabolition of consecration. DE's RT. n. . [desertum, Lat.] A wilder. nes; solitude ; waste country; uninhalted place. Be alive again, Andore me to the deser; with thy sword; If timbling I inhibit, then protest me Thodaby of a girl. Shakspeare. H. looking round, on every side behesi A Pihless desert, dusk with horrid shades. - Milton. DE’s RT. adj. [desertis, Latin.] Wild ; wate; solitary; uninhabited; uncultivatd ; untilled. I have werds Tha would be how!'d out in the desert air, Whore earing should not catch them. Shop. He find him in a desert land, and in the was howling wilderness. Deuteronomy. . The Tomises and bargains between two mon in a dere island are binding to them; though they areerfectly in a state of nature, in reforence to ce another. - Locke. To DESIRT. v. a. [deserter, French; desero, atin.] 1. To fonke; to fall away from ; to quit meanly’r treacherously. ..I do n remember one man, who heartily wished thbassing of that bill, that ever dooroo them tille kingdom was in a flame. Dryden. 2. To lea'; to abandon. What it that holds and keeps the orbs in fixed statis and intervals, against an incessant and inhert tendency to desert them? Botly 3. To quithe army, or regiment, in which one is eisted. Desror-1. . [properly dessert : the word is riginally French.] The last course; he fruit or sweetmeats with which arast is concluded. See DesS.E. R.T. DESE’RT. s. [from deserve.] * Qualitic or conduct considered with

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