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1. T8 mingle things so that their several forms or natures cannot be discerned. Let us go down, and there cofound their language, that they may not understand one onother's speech. - Genesis. Two planets rushing from aspect malign Of fiercest opposition, in mid sky Should combat, and theirjarring spheres confound. A silton. 2. To perplex; to compare or mention without due distinction. A fluid body and a wetting liquor are vont, because they agree in many things, to be con2.nd.ed. oyle. They who strip not ideas from the marks I men use for them, but confound them with words, must have endless dispute. locke. 3. To disturb the apprehension by indistinct words or notions. I am yet to think, that men find their simple ideas agree, though, in discourse, they confound one another with different names. .ocke. 4. To throw into consternation ; to perplex ; to terrify; to amaze; to astonish ; to stupify. So spake the Son of God; and Satan stood A while as mute, confounded what to say. Milton. Now with furies surrounded, Despairing, †† He trembles, he glows, Amidst Rhodope's snows. Pope's St. Cecilia. 5. To destroy ; to overthrow. The sweetest honey Is loathsome in its own deliciousness, And in the taste confound the appetite. Shakt. The gods confound thee! dost thou hold there still: ` - NAaocarz. Let them be co-founded in all their power and might, and let their strength be broken. Daniel. So deep a malice to coofound the race Of mankind in one root.

CoN Fo'UN D F p. particip. adi. [from con

sound.] Hateful : detestable ; enormous : odious : a low cant word.

A most confounded reason for his brutish con

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Cox Fo’u’s Dr. Dixy. ada. from confounded. Hatefully; shamefully: a low or ludicrous word. You are confounded y given to squirting up and down, and chattering. - o'Extrange. Thy speculations begin to smell *:::::::: of woods and meadows. Addison's Spectator. CoN Foot N D F. R. m. s. [from confound.] He who disturbs, perplexes, terrifies, or destroys. CoN FRATE/RNity. m. s. [from con and fraternitas, Lat.] A brotherhood; a body of men united for some religious purpose. -- . . . . . . We find days appointed to be kept; and a roofraternity established for that purpose, with the laws of it. . Stilingsleet. CoN FR IcA’Tio N. m. s. [from con and

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, any thing. It hath been reported, that ivy hath grown out of a stag's horn; which they suppose did rather come figma confication of the horn upon the ivy, than from the horn itself. Baron.

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Milton.

1. To stand against another in full vicw; to face. He spoke, and then Confronto the bull; And on his ample forehead, aiming full, The deadly stroke descended. Drydo. 2. To stand face to face, in opposition to another. The East and West churches did both confro the Jews, and concur with them. trier. Blood hath bought blood, and blows have inswer'd blows, Strength match'd with strength, and power to: ronted power. Shakpart. Belsona's bridegroom, lapt in proof, Confronted him with self comparisons, Point against point rebellious, arm 'gainst arm, Soakspeare's Mado. 3. To oppose one evidence to another in open court. fe began to lay his unkindness unto him: he seeing himself co-fronted by so many, went not to denial, but to justify his cruel ano i-foot. 4. To compare one thing with another. When I confront a medal with a verse, Ionly shew you the same design executed by differen: hands. Adiron on Moduli. CoN Front A’rio N. n.s. [French.] The act of bringing two evidences face to face,

To CONFU'SE. v. a. [consists, Lat.] 1. To disorder; to disperse irregularly. Thus roving on In confus'd march forlorn, th' advent'rous bands View'd first their lamentable lot, and o, it:t. 2. To mix, not separate. At length, an universal hubbub wild, Of stunning sounds and voices all confus'd, Borne through the hollow dark, assaults **:

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Hitherunto these titles of honour carry a kind •f confuedness, and rather betokened a successive office than an established dignity. Carew. The cause of the confusedness of our notions, next to natural inability, is want of attention. Morris. CoNFU'sion. m. s. [from confise.] 1. Irregular mixture; tumultuous medley. God, only wise, to punish pride of wit, Among men's wits hath this confusion wrought; As loud tow'r, whose points the clouds did lit, By tongues confusion was to ruin brought. Davier. 2. Tumult; disorder. o God is not a God of sedition and confusion, but of order and of peace. Hooker, Profice. * This is a happier and more comely time, Than when these fellows ran about the streets Crying confusion. Shakspeare's Coriolanus. 3. Indistinct combination. The confusion of two different ideas, which a customary connexion of them in their minds hath made to them almost one, fills their heads with false views, and their reasonings with false consequences. - Locke. 4. Overthrow ; destruction. The strength of their illusion Shall draw him in to his confusion. Shakspeare. 5. Astonishment; distraction of mind; hurry of ideas. Confusion dwelt in ev'ry face, And fear in ev'ry heart, When waves on waves, and gulphs in gulphs, O'ercame the pilot's art. Spectator. CoN Fu’t A B L E. adj. Ifrom confute.] Possible to be disproved; possible to be shewn false. At the last day, that inquisitor shall not present to God a bundle of calumnies, or constible accusations; but will offer unto his oniniscience a true list of our transgressions. Brown. CoN Fut A’r to N. m. s. [confutatio, Lat.] The act of confuting ; disproof. A confutation of atheism from the frame of the world. - Bently, To CONFU"TE. v. a. [confito, Latin.] To convict of error or falsehood ; to disprove. e could on either side dispute; ego; change hands, and still confute. Hudik. or a man to doubt whether there be any hell, and thereupon to live as if there were none, but, when he dies, to find himself confuted in the flames, must be the height of woe. South. CO'NGE. n.s.. [conge, French.] 1. Act of reverence; bow ; courtesy. The captain salutes you with foo profound, And your ladyship curt'sies half way to the ground. Swift. 2. Leave; farewell. So, courteous cong’ both did give and take, With right hands †, pledges of good-will. Fairy Queer. 72 Co’N GE. v. n. [from the noun..] To take leave. .. I have congred with the duke, and done my adieu with his nearest. Slalipeare. CO'NGE D’ELIRE is French ; and signifies in common law, the king's perInission royal to a dean and chapter, in time of vacation, to chuse a bishop. The king, as sovereign patron of all archbishopricks, bishopricks, and other scclesiastical benefices, had, in ancient times, the frce appointment of all eccle

siastical dignities; investing them first per baculum & annulum, and afterwards by his letters patent. In process of time he made the election over to others, under certain forms and conditions; as, that they should, at every vacation, before they chuse, demand of the king a congé d'esire, that is, licence' to proceed to election. Corvell. A woman, when she has made her own choice, for form's sake, sends a congé d'elire to her friends. Spectator.. CoN'GE. m. s. [In architecture.] A moulding in form of a quarter round, or a cavetto, which serves to separate two members from one another: such is that which joins the shaft of the column to the cincture. Chambers. To CONGEAL. v. a. [congelo, Latin.] 1. To turn, by frost, from a fluid to a solid state. What more miraculous thing may be told, Thanice, which is congeal’d with senseless cold, Should kindle fire by wonderful device? Spensor. In whose capacious womb A vapoury deluge lies, to snow corgoat'd. Thomson's Woiter. 2. To bind or fix, as by cold Oh, gentlemen, see! see! dead Henry's wounds Open their congeal’d mouths, and bleed as esh. Shakspeare's Richard III. Too much sadness hath congeal’d your blood. Sbal speare. To CoN GE'A L. v. n. To concrète; to gather into a mass by cold. In the midst of molten lead, when it beginmeth to congral, make a little dent, into which put quicksilver wrapt in linen, and it will fix and run no more, and endure the hammer. Bacon. When water congeals, the surface of the ice is smooth and level, as the surface of the water was before. Burn.' Theory. CoNGE'A LM NT, n. . [from congeal.] The clot formed by congelation; concretion. Enter the city, clip your wives, your friends: Tell them your feats, whilst they with joyful tears Wash the congealment from your wounds. Shakfare's Antony and Cleopatra. Cos GE's. A B I. E. adj. [from congeal.] Susceptible of congelation ; capable. of losing its fluidity. The consistencies of bodies are very divers: dense, rare, tangible, pneumatical, fixed, hard, soft, ogolable, not congelable, liquefiable, not liquefiable. Bacon. The chymists define salt, from some of its properties, to be a body fixable in the fire, and congclable again by cold into brittle glebes or crystals. - Arbuthnot on Aliments. Cos G. E. LA’rio N. m. s. [from congeal.] 1. Act of turning fluids to solids by cold. The capillary tubes are obstructed either b outward compression, or congelation of the fluid. - - rbuthnot on Aliment. There are cong-lations of the redundant water, precipitations, and many other operations. - Arbuthnot on Air. 2. State of being congealed, or made solid, by cold. a any waters and springs will never freeze; and many parts in rivers and lakes, where there. are mineral eruptions, will still persist without “volation. Brown's Pugar Errours. &n

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the same kind or nature. The cherry-tree has been often grafted on the laurel, to which it is a congener. Miller. CoN GE'N E Rous. adf. [congener, Latin.] Of the same kind ; arising from the same original. ose bodies, being of a congenerous nature, do readily receive the impressions of their nature. Brown's Pulgar Errours. From extreme and lasting colds proceeds a great run of apoplexies, and other congenerous diseases. Arbuthnot on Air. on GE'N E Rous N Ess. n. J. from congenerous ) . The quality of being from the same original; belonging to the same class. Dict. CONGE'NIAL. adj. [con and genius, Lat.] Partaking of the same genius; kindred ; cognate : in Swift it is followed by with. He sprung, without any help, by a kind of congenial composure, as we may term it, to the likeness of our late sovereign and master. Wotton. You look with pleasure on those things which are somewhat congenial, and of a remote kindred to your own conceptions. Dryden. Smit with the love of sister arts we came, And met congenial, miugling flame with flame. Pope. He acquires a courage, and stiffness of ji: nion, not at all congenial with him. Swift. CoN G EN1A/LITY. m. s. [from congenial.] Participation of the same genius; cognation of mind, or nature. CoN GE'NIALN Ess. n. J. [from congenial.] Cognation. CoN GE/NIT E. adj. [congenitus, Latin.] Of the same birth; born with another; connate ; begotten together. Many conclusions of moral and intellectual truths seem, upon this account, to be congenite with us, connatural to us, and engraven in the very frame of the soul. Hałe. Did we learn an alphabet in our embryo-state? And how comes it to pass, that we are not aware of any such congenite apprehensions 2 - Glanville's Scopsir. Co’NGER. m.s. seongrus, Lat.] The sea eel. Many fish, whose shape and nature are much like the eel, frequent both the sea and fresh rivers; as the mighty conger, taken often in the Severn. Walton's Angler. CoN G E 'R1Es. m. f. [Latin.] A mass of small bodies heaped up together. The air is nothing but a congeries or heap of small, and for the most part of flexible, particles, of several sizes, and of all kinds of figures. - Boyle. To CONGE'ST. v. a. [congero, congestum, Lat.] To heap up ; to gather together. oss E's TIBLE. adj. [from congest.] That may be heaped up. Dict. CoN C F.'s rios. n. 4. [congestio, Latin.] A collection of matter, as in abscesses and tumours. $ouincy. Congestion is then said to be the cause of a tumour, when the growth of it is slow, and without pain. Wiseman. Co'N G1 ARY. m. s. [congiarium, from congius, a measure of corn, Lat.] A gift distributed to the Roman people or sol

diery, originally in corn, afterward in money. * We see on them the emperor and generald. ficers, standing as they distributed a cungiary to the soldiers or people. ion, To CONGLA/CIATE. v. n. [ranglasia.

tus, Lat.] To turn to ice. No other doth properly conglaciate but witt: for the determination of quicksilver is properly fixation, and that of milk coagulation. Brown, CoN GL Act A’ los. n. 4. [from conglociate.] The state of being changed, or act of changing, into ice. If crystal be a stone, it is concreted by a mi. neral spirit, and lapidifical principles; for, whit it remained in a fluid body, it was a subt: very unfit for proper conglaciation. Brown.

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To conglo-MERATE. v.a.s. glomero, Lat.] To gather into a to like a ball of thread; to inweave it” a round mass. The liver is one great orglenorate to composed of innumerable small glands, oo which consisteth of soft fibres, in a distino separate convolution. Grrrr's * CoN Glo'MERAt E. adj. [from the wo 1. Gathered into a round ball, so as to the constituent parts and fibre; " distinct. Fluids are separated in the liver, and the * conglobate and conglomerate glands. * 2. Collected ; twisted together. ...so The beams of light, when they are muo and conglomerate, generate heat. off. CoNG LöMERA'i ion, n. . [from * glomerate.] 1. Collection of matter into 2. Intertexture ; mixture. The multiplicationing. lomeration cfs" doth generate rarefaction of the air.

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- T, CONGLUTINATE. v. a. [conglu- tino, Latin.] To cement; to reunite ; - to heal wounds. T, CoN G LU'1 1 NAT e.v.m. To coalesce; to unite by the intervention of a callus. CoNGLUT INA’t low. n.s. [from conglutinate.] The act of uniting wounded bodies; reunion ; healing. The cause is a temperate conglutination : for both bodies are clammy and viscous, and do bridle the deflux of humours to the hurts. Bacon. To this elongation of the fibres is owing the union or conglutination of parts separated by a wound. Arbuthnot on Aliments. CoNG LU'TINAT 1 v E. adj. [from conglutinate.] Having the power of uniting wounds. CoN G LUT1 NA’ro R. m. s. [from conglutinate.] That which has the power of uniting wounds. The osteocolla is recommended as a conglutinator of broken bones. Woodward on Fossils. CoN GR A^T U 1. ANT. adj. [from congratufate.] Rejoicing in participation ; expressing participation of another’s joy. Forth rush'dinhaste the great consulting peers, Rais'd from the dark divan, and with like joy Congratulant approach'd him. ilton. To CONGRATULATE. v. a. [gratulor, Latin.] 1. To compliment upon any happy event ; to express joy for the $o. of another. I congratulate our English tongue, that it has been enriched with words from all our neighbours. Watts' Logick. 2. It has sometimes the accusative case of the cause of joy, and to before the person.' - - An ecclesiastical union within yourselves, I am rather ready to congratulate to you. Spratt. The subjects of Englaud may congratulate to themselves, that the nature of our government, and the clemency of our king, secure us. Dryd. To Co N G R A^T U LATE. v. n. To rejoice in participation. * I cannot but congratulate with my country, which hath outdone all Europe in advancing

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sonversation. - Swift. CoN GRATULA't lon, n.s.. [from congratulate.]

1. The act of professing joy for the happiness or success of another. 2. The form in which joy for the happiness of another is professed. CoN GRA’t ULA to R Y. adj. [from congratulate.] Expressing joy for the good fortune of another. To concre'E. v. n. [from gre, French.] To agree; to accord; to join ; to unite. Not in use. For government, Put into parts, doth keep in one concent, Congreeing in a full and natural close. Shaks. To Co N or E'E.T. v. n. [from con and greet.] To salute reciprocally. Not in lusc. My office hath so far prevail'd, That face to face, and royal eye to eye, You have congreeted. so, Henry v. 2To CONGREGATE. v. a. [congrego, I-at-] To collect together; to assemble ; * bring into one place.

Any multitude of christian men congregated may be termed by the name of a church. Hooker. These waters were afterwards congregated, and called the sea. Raleigh. Tempests themselves, high seas, and howling winds, The gutter'd rocks, and congregated sands, As having sense of beauty, do omit Their mortal natures. Shałpeare's Othello. The dry land, earth; and the great receptacle Of congregated waters, he call'd sea: And saw that it was good. Milton, Heat congregates homogeneal bodies, and separates heterogeneal ones. , Newton's Opticks. Light, congregated o a burning glass, acts most upon sulphureous odies, to turn them into fire. Newton's Optico. To Co'N GRE GATE. v. n. To assemble; to meet; to gather together. He rails, Ev’n there where merchants most do congregate, On me, my bargains. §. 'T is true (as the old proverb doth relate), Equals with equals often congregate. Denban. Co’N GRE G AT E. adj. [from the verb.] Collected ; compact. Where the matter is most congregate, the cold is the greater. Bacon's Natural History. CoN GRE G A'Tio N. n.s.. [from congregate J 1. The act of collecting. The means of reduction by the fire, is but by congregation of homogeneal parts. Bacon. 2. A collection; a mass of various parts brought together. This brave o'erhanging firmament appears no other thing to me, than a foul and pestilent congregation of vapours. Shakspeare. 3. An assembly met to worship God in publick, and hear doctrine. The words which the minister, first promeunceth, the whole congregation shall repeat after him. - coker. The practice of those that prefer houses before churches, and a conventicle before the congregation. South. If those preachers who abound in epiphonemas, would look about them, they would find part of their congregation out of countenance, and the other asleep. ... 1 Swift. CoN GREGA/TION A L. adj. [from congregation.] Publick ; pertaining to a congregation or assembly. It is a word used of such christians as hold every congregation to be a separate and independent church.

CO'NGRESS. m. s. [congressus, Latin.] 1. A meeting ; a shock ; a conflict. Here Pallas urges on, and Lausus there; Their congress in the field great Jove withstands, Both doom'd to fall, but fall by greater hands. - Dryden's Aeneid. From these laws may be deduced the rules of the congresses and reflections of two bodies. . Cheyne's Philosophical Principler. 2. An appointed meeting for settlement of affairs between different nations: as, the congress of Cambray. CoN GRR'ss IV e. adj. ãom congress.] Meeting; encountering; coming together. If it be understood of sexes conjoined, all plants are female; and if of disjoined and congressive generation, there is no male or female in them. Brown's Puig. Erreurs.

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Lat.] To agree; to be consistent with 3 to suit; to be agreeable. Not in use. Our sovereign process imports at full, By letters congring to that effect, The present death of Hamlet. Shakspeare. CoN GRU'EN ce. n.s. I congruentia, Latin.] Agreement ; suitableness of one thing to another; consistency. CoN Gro’ENT. adj. [congruens, Latin.] Agreeing : correspondent. These planes were so separated as to move upon a common side of the congruent squares, as an axis. Cheyne's Philosophical Principles. CoN GRV'ity. n. . [from £ongrue.] I. Suitableness; agreeableness. . Congruity of opinions to our natural constitution, is one great incentive to their reception. Glanville. 2. Fitness; pertinence. A whole sentence may fail of its congruity by

"wanting one particle. Sidney. 3. Consequence of argument; reason; consistency.

With what congruity doth the church of Rome deny, that her enemies do not at all appertain to the church of Christ 2 safer. 4. [In geometry.] Figures or lines which - exactly correspond, when laid over one another, are in congruity. CoN'GRUMENT. n. . [from congrue.] Fitness; adaptation. Not in use. The congrument and harmonious fitting of ric's in a sentence, hath almost the fastening and force of knitting and connexion. Benjanson. Co's G R vous. adj. [congruus, Lat.] I. Agreeable to ; consistent with. The existence of God is so many ways manifest, and the obedience we owe him so congruous to the light of reason, that a great part of mankind give testimony to the law of nature. Locke. 2. Suitable to ; accommodated to ; proportionate or commensurate. The faculty is infinite, the object infinite, and they infinitely congruous to one another. Cheyne's Philosophical Principles. 3. Rational ; fit. Motives that address themselves to our reason, are fittest to be employed upon reasonable crea: tures: it is no ways congruous, that God should be always frightening men into an acknowledgment of the truth. Atterbury. Co's go ously: adv. [from congruous...] Suitably ; pertinently; consistently. This conjecture is to be regarded, because, ***śrously unto it, one having warmed the blad. der, found it then lighter, than the opposite weight. Boyle's Spring of the Air. Qo's real. adj...[conicus, Lat.] Having Co’Nic K. 5 the form of a come, or round decreasing. Tow'ring firs in conic *forms arise, And with a pointed spear divide the skics. Prior. A brown fint of a conick figure: the basis is oblong. Woodward. They are conical vessels, with their bases towards the heart; and, as they pass on, their diameters grow still less. Arbuthnot. Co’s iCALLY. adv. [from conical.] In form of a cone. In a watering pot, shaped conically, or like a sugar-loaf, filled with water, no liquor falls through the holes at the bottom, whilst the Kardenerkeeps histhumb upon the orifice at the top. Boyle's Spring of the dir.

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