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A'GONY. m. s. [...yw; agen, low Lat. agonie, Fr.] 1. The pangs of death; properly, the last contest between life and death. Never was there more pity in saving any than in ending me, because therein my agony shall end. so. Thou who for me did feel such pain, Whose precious blood the cross did stain, Let not those agonies be vain. Roscomman. 2. Any violent or excessive pain of body or mind. Betwixt them both, they have me done to dy, Thro' wounds and strokes, and stubborn handeling, That death were better than such *::: As grief and fury unto me did bring. Fairy Q. Thee h have miss'd, and thought it long, deriv Th; resence, †. ! till now Not felt, nor sh twice. Paradise Lost. 3. It is particularly used in devotions for our Redeemer's conflict in the garden. To propose our desires, which cannot take such effect as we specify, shall, notwithstanding, otherwise procure us his heavenly grace, even as this very prayer of Christ obtainedangels to be sent him as comfortersin his agony. Hooker. AGo'o D. adv. [a and good.] In earnest; not fictitiously. Not in use. At that time I made her weep agood, For I did play a lamentable part. Shakspeare. AGou’T Y. m. s. An animal of the Antilles, of the bigness of a rabbit, with bright red hair, and a little tail without hair. He has but two teeth in each jaw, holds his meat in his fore-paws like a squirrel, and has a very remarkable cry. When he is angry, his hair stands on end, and he strikes the earth with his hind-feet, and, when chased, he flies to a hollow tree, whence he is expelled by smoke. Trevour. To AGRA’ce. v. a. [from a and grace.] To grant favours to; to confer benefits

upon. Not in use. he granted, and that knight so much agrac'd, That she him taught celestial discipline. Fairy Q.

AGRA’M M A risT. n. 3. [a, priv. and yopopa.] An illiterate man. Dict. AGRA'RIAN. adj. [agrarius, Lat..] Relating to fields or grounds: a word seldom used but in the Roman history, where there is mention of the agrarian law. 3so AGRE’As E. v. a. [from a and grease.] - #. daub; to grease; to pollute with th. The waves thereof so slow and sluggish were, Engross'd with mud, which did them foul agrease. Fairy Queen. To AGRE'E. v. n. [agreer, Fr. from gre, H. or good-will ; gratia and gratus, at. 1. To be in concord ; to live without contention; not to differ. The more you agree together, the less hurt can your enemies do you. %. on Epic Poetry.

2. To grant; to yield to; to admit: with the particles to or upon. And persuaded them to agree to all reasonable conditions. 2 Mackabees, We do not prove the origin of the earth from a chaos; seeing that is agreed on by all that give it any origin. Burnet. 3. To settle amicably. A form of words were quickly agreed on betweenthem for a perfect combination. Clarendon. 4. To settle terms by stipulation; to accord: followed by conth. Agree with thine adversary, quickly, whilst thou art in the way with him; lest at any time the adversary deliver thee to the judge, and the judge deliver thee to the officer, and thou be cast into prison. - Matthew. 5. To settle a price between buyer and seller. Friend, I do thee no wrong: didst not thou agree with me for a penny? Matthew. 6. #. be of the same mind or opinion. He exceedingly provoked or underwent the envy, and reproach, and malice, of men, of all §. ities and conditions, who agreed in nothing else. Clarendon. Milton is a noble genius, and the world agree, to confessit. Watts' Improvement of the Mind. 7. To concur; to co-operate. Must the whole man, amazing thought! return To the cold marble and contracted urn? And never shall those particles agree, That were in life this individual he Prior. 8. To settle some point among many: with upon before a noun. Strifes and troubles would be endless, except they gave their common consent to be ordered by some whom they should agree open. Hooker. If men, skilled in chymical affairs, shall agree to write clearly, and keep men from being stunned by dark or empty words, they will be reduced either to write nothing, or books that may teach us something. Boyle. 9. To be consistent; not to contradict: with to or with. For many bear false witness against him, but their witness agreed not together. Mark. They that stood by said again to Peter, surely thou art one of them: for thou art a Galilean, and thy speech agreeth thereto. Afzré. Which testimony I the less scruple to allege, because it agrees very well with what has been affirmed to me. JeIo. To suit with 5 to be accommodated to : with to or with. Thou feedest thine own food, and didst send them from heaven bread agreeing to every taste. Fraser. His principles could not be made to agree wits that constitution and order which God had settled in the world; and, therefore, must needs clash with common sense and experience. Locłr11. To cause no disturbance in the body. I have often thought, that our prescribing asses' milk in such small quantities is injudicious; for, undoubtedly, with such as it agrees witk, it would perform much greater and quicker ef. fects, in greater quantities. Arbert&ret. To AGRE’E. v.a.

1. To put an end to a variance.

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He saw from far, or seemed for to see, Some troublous uproar or contentious fray, Whereto he drew in haste it to agree. Fairy Q. 2. To make friends; to reconcile. The mighty rivals, whose destructive rage Did the whole world in civil arms engage, Are now agreed. koans. AGRE'EAble. adj. [agréable, Fr.] 1. Suitable to; consistent with ; conformable to. It has the particle to or with. This paucity of blood is agreeable to many other animals, as frogs, lizards, and other fishes. Brown's Vulgar Errours. The delight which men have in popularity, fame, submission, and subjection of other men's minds, seemethto be a thing, in itself, without contemplation of consequence, agreeable and grateful to the nature of man. Bacon's Nat. Hist. What you do, is not at all agreeable either with so good a christian, or so reasonable and so great a person. Temple. That which is agreeable to the nature of one thing, is many times contrary to the nature of another. L'Estrange. As the practice of all piety and virtue is *frarable to our reason, so it is likewise the interest both of private persons and of public societies. Tillotron. 1. In the following passage the adjective is used by a familiar corruption for the adverb agreeably. Agreeable hereunto, perhaps it might not be amiss, to make children, as soon as they are capable of it, often to tell a story. Locke. 3. Pleasing ; that is suitable to the inclination, faculties, or temper. It is used in this sense both of persons and things. And while the face of outward things we find leasant and fair, agreeable and sweet, These things transport. Sir j. Davies. I recollect in my mind the discourses which have passed between us, and call to mind a thousand agreeable remarks which he has made on these occasions. Spectator. Agre'EA el E Ness. n.s.. [from agreeable.] I. Consistency with ; suitableness to : with the particle to: Pleasant tastes depend not on the things themselves, but their agreeableness to this or that particular palate, wherein there is great vario, - co-or1. The quality of pleasing. It is used in an inferiour sense, to mark the production of satisfaction, calm and lasting, but below rapture or admiration. There will be occasion for largeness of mind and agreeableness of temper. Collier. It is very much an image of that author's writing, who has an agreeableness that charms us, without correctness; like a mistress, whose faults we see, but love her with them all. Pope. 3. Resemblance; likeness: sometimes with the particle between. This relation is likewise seen in the agreeablereis tetween man and the other parts cf the universe. Grew's Cosmologia Sacra. AGRE'EABLY. adv. [from agrarao..] 1. Consistently with , in a mannet suitable to,

They may look into the affairs of Judea and Jerusalem, agreeably to that which is in the law of the Lord. 1 Esdras. 2. Pleasingly. I did never imagine, that so many excellent rules could be produced so advantageously and agreeably. Swift. Ad RE(Ed. participial adj. [from agree..] . Settled by consent. When they had got known and agreed names to signify those internal operations of their own minds, they were sufficiently furnished to make known by words all their ideas. LockeAG RE’E IN GN Ess. n.s.. [from agree..] Consistence; suitableness.' AGRE'EMENT. n. 4. [agrément, Fr. in law Latin agreamentum, which Coke would willingly derive from aggregatio mentrum.] 1. Concord. What agreement is there between the hyena and the dog? and what peace between the rich and the poor 2 Ecclus. 2. Resemblance of one thing to another. The division and quavering which please so much in musick, have an agreement with the glittering of light, as the moon-beams playing upon a wave. ufort. Expansion and duration have this farther agreement, that though they are both considered by us as having parts, yet their parts are not separable one from another. Locke. 3. Compact; bargain ; conclusion of controversy; stipulation. And your covenant with death shall be disannulled, and your agreement with hell shall not stand; when the overflowing scourge shall pass through, then ye shall be trodden down by it. Iraiah. Make an agreement with me by a present, and come out to me, and then eat ye every man of his own vine, and every one of his fig-tree. 2 Kings. Frog had given his word, that he would meet the company to talk of this agreement. Arbuthnot. Ag RE's Tick, or AG RE'stical. ads. [from agreşti, Lat.] Having relation to the country; rude; rustick. Dict. Ac Rico LA’t lo N. m. s. [from agricola, Lat.] Culture of the ground. Dict. A/G Ricultur E. m. s. ['gricultura, Lat.] The art of cultivating the ground; tillage; husbandry, as distinct from pasturage. He strictly adviseth not to begin to sowbefore the setting of the stars; which, notwithstanding: without injury to agriculture, cannot be observed in England. Brown's Vulgar Errouru. That there was tillage bestowed upon the antediluvian ground, Moses does indeed intimate in general; what sort of tillage that was, is not expressed: I hope to shew that their agriculture was nothing near so laborious and troublesome, nor did it take up so much time as ours doth. Woodward’s Natural History. The disposition of Ulysses inclined him to war, rather than the more lucrative, but more secure, method of life, by agriculture and hushandry. , Arvone's Notes on the Odyssey.

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Were you by stress of weather ras: -groo Drozzi's AE-rof. 2. It is likewise figuratively used. for beinz hindered in the progress of affairs; as, the negociators were 572- at that objection. A'GUE. r. 1. [azz, Fr. arzt".] An interritting fever, with cold fits succe-ded by hot. The cold fit is, in popular larguage, more particularly called the ago, and the hot the fever. Our castle's strength will laugh a siege to scorn. Here let them lie Till famine and the agaz eat them up. Shais. Though He feels the heats oath, and colds of age, Yet neither tempers nor corrects the other; As if there were an ague in his nature, That still inclines to one extreme. Dembam. A'oued. ads. [from aguz.] Struck with an ague; shivering; chill; cold: a word in little use. All hurt behind, backs red, and faces pale, With flight and agued fear! bai peare. A'GUE-Fi T. n. 1. from ague and so..] The paroxysm of the ague. This ague fit of fear is overblown. Shałop. A'Gu E-PRoo P. adj. [from ague and proof.] Proof against agues; able to resist the causes which produce agues, without being affected. When the rain came to wet me once, and the wind to make me chatter; when the thunder would not peace at my bidding; there I found 'em, there I smelt 'em out. They told me I was everything: 'tis a lie; I am not ague proof. Shakspeare's King Lear. A'GUE-TREE. n. 4. [from ague and tree.] A name sometimes given to sassafras. Dict. To Advi's E. v. a. [from a and guise.] See GU15 E.] To dress; to adorn; to deck. Not in use. As her fantastic wit did most delight, Sometimesher head she fondly would aguire With gaudy garlands, or fresh flowers dight About her neck, or rings of rushes §.

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AHE'AD. adv. [from a and head.] 1. Further onward than another: a sta term. And now the mighty Centaur seems to lead, And now the speedy Dolphin gets ahead. Dryd. 2. Headlong; precipitantly: used of animals, and figuratively of men. It is mightily the fault of parents, guardians, tutors, and governours, that so many men mis: carry. They suffer them at first to run ahead, and, when perverse inclinations are advanced into habits, there is no dealing with them. L'Estr. AH E's GHT. adv. [from a and bright.] Aloft; on high. But have I fall'n or no?— —From the dread summit of this chalkwbourne! Look up aheight, the shrill-gorg’d lark so far Cannot be seen or heard. Shakspeare's K. Liar. AHOUA’I. m. s. A poisonous plant. To AID. v. a. [aider, Fr. from adjutaro, Lat.] To help; to support; to suc

cour. Into the lake he leapt, his lord to aid, And of him catching : him strongly staid From drowning. Spenser's Fairy Qo. Neither i they give any thing unto them that make war upon them, or aid them with victuals, weapons, money, or shi Mazo. By the loud trumpet, which our courage aid, We learn that sound as well as sense persuades.

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AID. m. 1. [from the verb.] I. Help; support. The me of useful things may receive considerable aid, if they are thrown into verse. watts' Improvement of the Mind. Your patrimonial stores in peace Ss; Undoubted all your : claim confess: Your private right, should impious power invade, The peers of Ithaca would arm in aid. Pope. 4. The person that gives help or support; a helper; auxiliary. Thou hast said, it is not good that man should be alone; let us make unto him an aid, like unto himself. Tobit. Great aid, came in to him, partly upon missives, and Partly voluntaries from many parts. acort3. In law. A subsidy. Aid is also particularly used, in matter of pleading, for a petition made in court, of the calling in of help from another that hath an interest in the cause in question; and is likewise both to give strength to the party that prays in aid of him, and also to avoid a prejudice acGuing towards his own right except it be prevented: as, when a tenant for a term of life, courtesy, to... being impleaded touching his estate, he may pray in aid of him in the revertion; that is, entreat the court, that he may be alled in by writ, to allege what he thinks good for the maintenance both of his right and his Own. Cowell. Al'dance. n. . [from aid.] Help; support: a word little used. 9st have I seen a timely parted ghost, Qfishy semblance, meagre, pale, and bloodless, Being ill descended to the laboring heart, 'ho, in the conflict that it holds with death, Attracts the same foraidance'gainst the enemy. Shakspeare's Henry Wi. Aspast. adj. [aidant, Fr.] Helping; helpful. Not in use. All you unpublish'd virtues of the earth, .. with my tears; be aidant and remediate In the good mán's distress. Shakspeare. Al'oes n.s.. [from aid.] He that brings aid or help ; a helper; an ally. All along as he went, were punished the adherents and aiders of the late rebels. Bacon. Al'oless. adj. [from aid, and less, an inseparable particle.] Helpless; unsupported; undefended. Alone he enter'd The mortal gate o' th' city, which he painted With shunless destiny: aiders came off, And, with a sudden re-enforcement, struck Corioli like a planet. Shakspeare. He had met Already, ere my best speed could prevent, The siders innocent lady, hiswish'd prey. Milt. A'iculet. n. 4. [agulet, Fr.] A point with tags; points of gold at the end of fringes. It all above besprinkled was throughout With golden aigulets that glister'd o Like twinkling stars, and all the skirt about Was hemm'd with goldenfringes. Fairy Queen. Te AIL. v. a. [e;lan, Sax. to be troublesome.]

1. To pain; to trouble; to give pain.

And the angel of God called to Hagar out of heaven, and said unto her, what aileth thee Hagar fear not: for God hath heard the voice of the lad where he is. Genesis. 2. It is used in a sense less determinate, for to affect in any manner: as, something ails me that I cannot sit sull; what ails the man that he laughs without reason f Love smiled and thus said, Want joined to desire is unhappy; but if he nought do desire, what can Heraclitus ail P Sidney. What ail me, that I cannot lose thy thought, Command the empress hither to be brought, I, in her death, shall some diversion find, And rid my thoughts at once of woman-kind. Dryden's Tyrannick Love. 3. To feel pain ; to be incominoded. 4. It is remarkable, that this word is never used but with some indefinite term, or the word notbing ; as, I/bat alls him 2 What does he ail P He alls someobing * he al/s motbing. Something ails bim; nothing ails him. Thus we never say, a fever ails him, or he ai's a fever, or use definite terms with this verb. Ai l. n.s.. [from the verb.] A disease. Or heal, O Narses, thy obscener ail. Pope. A/1 LIN G. participial adj. . [from To ail.] Sickly; full of complaints. Ai’l MENT. n. s. [from ail.] Pain ; disease. Little ailments oft attend the fair, Not decent for a husband's eye or ear. Granville. I am never ill, but I think of your ailment., and repine that they mutually hinder our being together. Swift's Letters. To AIM. v. n. [It is derived by Skinner from esmer, to point at ; a word which I have not yet found.] . To endeavour to strike with a missive weapon; to direct toward: with the particle at. Ain't thou at princes, all amaz'd they said, The last of games? Pope's Odyssey. . To point the view, or direct the steps, toward any thing ; to tend toward; to endeavour to reach or obtain: with to formerly, now only with at. Lo, here the world is bliss; so here the end To which all men do aim, rich to be made, Such grace now to be happy is before thee laid. Fairy Queen. Another kind there is, which although we desire for itself, as health, and virtue, and knowledge, nevertheless they are not the last mark whereaf we aim, but have their further end whereunto they are referred. Hooker. Swoln with applause, and aiming still at more, He now provokes the sea-gods from the shore, Dryden's Aeneid. Religion tends to the ease and pleasure, the peace and tranquillity of our minds, whichall the wisdom of the world did always air at, as the utmost felicity of this life. Tillotics. 3. To guess. To AIM. v. a. To direct the missile weapon; more particularly taken for the

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act of pointing the weapon by the eye before its dismission from the hand. And proud deus, Priam's charioteer, Who shakes his empty reins, and aims his airy spear. Dryden. AIM. m. s. [from the verb.T 1. The direction of a missile weapon. Ascanius, young and eager of his game, Soon bent his bow, uncertain of his aim ; But the dire fiend the fatal arrow guides, Which pierc'd his bowels through his panting - sides. Dryden's Aeneid. 2. The point to which the thing thrown is directed. That arrows fled not swifter toward their aim, Than did our soldiers, aiming at their safety, Fly from the field. Shakspeare. 3. In a figurative sense, a purpose; a scheme ; an intention ; a design. He trusted to have equall'd the Most High, If he oppos'd : and, with ambitious aim, Against the throne and monarchy of God Rais'd impious war. Milton's Paradise Lost. But see how oft ambitious aims are crost, And chiefs contend till all the prize is lost. Pope. 4. The object of a design ; the thing after which any one endeavours. The safest way is to suppose, that the epistle has but one airn, till, by a frequent perusal of it, you are forced to see there are distinct independent parts. Locke's Essay on St. Paul's Epistles. 5. Conjecture; guess. It is impossible, by aim, to tell it; and, for experience and knowledge thereof, I do not think that there was ever any of the particulars thereof. Spenser on Ireland. There is a histcry in all men's lives, Figuring the nature cf the times deceas'd; The which observ'd, a man may prophesy, With a near airn, of the main chance of things As yet not come to life, which in their seeds And weak beginnings lie intreasured. Shakop. AIR... n.s.. [air, Fr. aer, Lat.] 1. The element encompassing the terraqueous globe. If I were to tell what I mean by the word air, I may say, it is that fine matter which we breathe in and breathe out continually; or it is that thin fluid body, in which the birds fly, a little above the earth; or it is that invisible matter, which fills all places near the earth, or which immediately encompasses the globe of earth and water. Watts' Logick. 2. The state of the air; or the air considered with regard to health. There be many good and healthful airs, that do appear by habitation and other proofs, that differ not in smell from other airs. Pacon. 3. Air in motion; a small gentle wind. Fresh gales, and gentle airs, Whisper'd it to the woods, and from their wings Flung rose, flung odours from the spicy shrub Disporting! Milton's Paradise Lost. ut safe repose, without an air of breath, Dwells here, and a dumb quiet next to death. Dryden. Let vernal airs through trembling osiers play, And Albion's cliffs resound the rural lay. K. 4. Scent; vapour. Stinks which the nostrils straight abhor are not the most pernicious, but such air, as have o

some similitude with man's body; and so insinate themselves, and betray the spirits. Barco, 5. Blast ; pestilential vapour. All the stor'd vengeance of heav'n fall On her ingrateful top! strike her young bones, You taking airs, with lameness! Shahport. 6. Anything light Qr uncertain; that is as light as air. O momentary grace of mortal men, , Which we more hunt for than the grace of God! Who builds his hope in air of your fair looks, Lives like a drunken sailor on a mast, Ready with ev’ry nod to tumble down. Shah?. 7. The open weather; air unconfined. The garden was inclos'd within the square, Where young Emilia took the morning#. re. 8. Went ; utterance; emission into the air. I would have ask'd you, if I durst for shame, If still you loved you gave it air before me. But ah! why were we not both of a sex? For then we might have lov'd without a crime. -jo9. Publication; exposure to the publick view and knowledge. I am sorry to find it has taken air, that I have some hand in these papers. Pope's Lotto: ro. Intelligence; information. This is not now in use. It grew from the airs which the princes so states abroad received from their ambassadors and agents here. Bacon's Henry vil. 11. Musick, whether light or serious; sound ; air modulated. ! This musick crept by me upon the waters, Allaying both their fury and my passion, With its sweet air. Shahp?are's Terpet. Call in some musick; I have f: soft airt Can charin our senses, and expel our care: Denban's Soy. The same airs which some entertain with most delightful transports, to others are importune. Glanville's Scopsis Scientio-3Since we have such a treasury of words soproper for the airs of musick, I wonder that person; should give so little attention. š. r. Borne on the swelling notes, our souls aspire,

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12. Poetry; a song. The repeated air Of sad Electra's poet had the pow'r To save the Athenian walls from ruin bare. Paradise Rogairo 13. The mien, or manner, of the person the look. Her graceful innocence, her ev'ry air, Ofgesture, or least action, over-aw'd His malice. Paradire Le: For the air of youth Hopeful and cheerful, in thy blood shall reign A melancholy damp of cold and dry, To ". th o down; and last consume The balm o e. Paradore Le But having the life before us, besides the e perience of all they knew, it is no wonder to Y some airs and features, which they have miss: Dryden on Dramatici Peet,

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