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1. Having no care; feeling no solicitude ;

unconcerned ; negligent; inattentive; heedless; regardless; thoughtless; neglectful; unheeding; unthinking; unmindful: with of or about. Knowing that if the worst befal them, they shall lose nothing but themselves; *g they seem very eartless. penter. No lose the good advantage of his gro, By seeming j. or careless of his wil Shakup. A woman, the more curious she is about hor face, is commonly the more corolo, or her Ouse. Ben 'fonson. A father, unnaturally career, of his child, sells , or gives him to another man. Locke. 2. Cheerful ; undisturbed. Thu: Wisely, rareless, innocently gay, Cheerful he play’d. Pope. In my cheerful morn of life, When nurs'd by earclass solitude I liv'd, #nd ong of niture with unceasing joy, Pleas'd have I wander'd through your rough domain. Thomson. 3. Unheeded; thoughtless; unconsidered. The freedom of saying as many rareless things as other people, ... being so severely remarked upon. Pope. 4. Unmoved by : unconcerned at. Career of thunder from the clouds that break, My only omens from your looks fok. G. 22 CARE'SS. v. a. [caresser, Fr. from carus, Lat.] To endear; to fondle ; to treat with kindness. If I can feast, and please, and care, my mind with the pleasures of worthy speculations, or vio. tuous practices, let greatness and malice vex and abridge me, if they can. - South. Cool'ss. n. ... [from the verb.] "An act of endearment; an expression of tenderness. He, she knew, would intermix $rateful digressions, and solve high dispute ith conjugal caresses. AMilton. There are some men who seem to have brutal minds wrapt up in human shapes; their very caretres are crude and importune. L'Estrange. After his successour had publickly owned himself a Roman catholick, he began with his first caresses to the church party. Swift. C4'8". T. n. . [caret, Lat. there is want. ing.] A note which shows where something interlined should be read. CA'RGASON. m. g. [targaçon, Spanish.] A cargo. Not used. My body is a cargason of ill humours. Howel. CA'Roo. n.f. [charge, Fr.] The lading of a ship; the merchandise or wares contained and conveyed in a o In the hurry of the shipwreck, Simonides was the only man that appeared unconcerned, notwithstanding that his whole fortune was at stake in the cargo. L'Estrange. A. ğ. Cargo was no less than a whole world, that carried the fortune and hopes of all posterity. Burnet's Theory. This gentleman was then a young adventurer in the republick of letters, and just fitted out for the university with a good targo of Latin and Greek. ddison.

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CA'RLINE Thustle. [carlina, Lat]." plant. - Milt CA'RLINGs. n. 4. [In a ship.] Timbo lying fore and aft, along from one beam to another; on these the ledges rest, " which the planks of the deck are mo fast. o, CARMAN. n. . [from car and man.]. man whose employment it is to di" cars. If the strong cane support thy walkingho, Chairmen no longer shall the wall command; E’en sturdy earmen shall thy nod obey, G Andrattling coachesstop to make theeway.” CA'RME Life. n. ... [carmelite, Fr.] sort of pear. CA R M. o, E. adj. [supposed to *: called, as ‘. wim carminis, to wer of a charm. Po are such things as dilute and lax at the same time, because wind ‘. spasm, or convulsion, in some parts. Who" romotes insensible perspiration, is carvio. #. wind is perspirable matter retained o body. Arbuthnot an dio" &xist. and diuretick . . :* Will damp all passion sympathetick. So

CA’s MINE.m. f. A bright red or crimson colour, bordering on purple, used by painters in miniature. It is the most valuable product of the cochineal mastick, and of an excessive price. Chambers. CA'RN AGE. n. 4. [carnage, Fr. from caro, carnis, Lat.] 1. Slaughter; havock; massacre. - Hebrought the king's forces upon them rather as to carnage than to fight, insomuch as, without any great lossor danger to themselves,the greatest part of the seditious were slain. Hayward. 2. Heaps of flesh. Such a scent I draw Of carnage, prey innumerable! and taste The savour of death from all things there that live. o AMilton. His ample maw with human earnage fill'd, A milky deluge next the giant .# Pope. CA/RNAL. adj. [carnal, Fr. carnalis, low Lat.] 1. Fleshly ; not spiritual. Thou dost justly require us to submit our understandings to thine, and deny our carnal reason, in order to thy sacred mysteries and commands. Æing Charles. From that pretence Spiritual laws by carnal pow'r shall force On every conscience. Not such in carnal pleasure: for which cause, Among the beasts no mate for thee was found. JMilton. A glorious apparition! had not doubt, And carnal fear, that day dimm'd Adam's eye. Milton. He perceives plainly, that his appetite to spiritual things abates, in proportion as his sensual appetite is indulged and encouraged; and that carnal desires kill not only the desire, but even the power, of tasting purer delights. Atterb. 2. Lustful; lecherous; libidinous. This carnal cur Preys on the issue of his mother's body. Shaksp. CA RNA’ll T Y. n. 4. [from carnal.] 1. Fleshly lust; compliance with carnal desires. If godly, why do they wallow and sleep in all the carnalities of the world, under pretence of christian liberty * South. 2. Grossness of mind. He did not institute this way of worship, but because of the carnality of their hearts, and the proneness of that o to idolatry. ‘Tillotson. CA/RNALLY. adv. [from carnal.] According to the flesh ; not spiritually. §. they found men indiet, attire, furniture of house, or any other way, observers of civility and decent order, such they reproved, as being earnally and earthly minded. ooker. In the sacrament we do not receive Christ carnally, but we receive him spiritually; and that of itself is a conjugation of blessings and spiritual graces. aylor's Worthy Communicant. CA’RNA lin Ess. n. J. Carnality. Dirt. CARNA’rio N. m. s. [carnes, Lat.] The name of the natural flesh colour, from which perhaps the flower is named ; the name of a flower. And |. the wretch! whose vile, whose insect ust Laid this gay daughter of the spring in dust: O punish him! or to the Elysian shades Dismiss my soul, where no carnation fades. Pope. CAR N folio N. a. s. A precious stone. The common carnelion has its name from its fest, colour; which is, in some of these stones,

Milton.

paler, when it is called the female earnelion; in others deeper, called the male. M’oodward. CA'RN Eous. ads. [carneus, Lat.] Fleshy. In a calf, the umbilical vessels terminate in certain bodies, divided into a multitude of carneous papillae. To CA/RN IF Y. v. n. [from caro, carnis, Lat.] To breed flesh ; to turn nutriment into flesh. At the same time I think, I deliberate, I purose, I command: in inferiour faculties, I walk, see, I hear, I digest, I sanguify, I carnisy. Hale'. Origin of Mankind. CA*RN i v A L. m. s. [carnaval, Fr.] The feast held in the popish countries before Lent; a time of luxury. The whole year is but one mad carniva!; and we are voluptuous not so much upon desire or appetite, as by way of exploit and bravery. Decay of Piety. CAR NI'vo Rous. adj. [from carnis and •voro.] Flesh-eating ; that of which flesh is the proper food. In birds there is no mastication or comminution of the meat in the mouth; but in such as are not carnivorous, it is immediately swallowed into the crop or craw. Fay on the Creation. Man is by his frame, as jo as his appetite, a carnivorous animal. Arbuthnot on Aliments. CAR No's in Y. n.s.. [carnosité, Fr.] Fleshy excrescence. By this method, and by this course of diet, with sudorifics, the ulcers are healed, and that carnosity resolved. Wiseman. CA/RNous. adj. [from cars, carnis, Lat.] Fleshy. The #. or outward part is a thick and carnoms covering, like that of a walnut ; the second, a dry and flosculous coat, commonly called mace. Brown's Pulgar Errours. The muscle whereby he is enabled to draw himself together, the academists describe to be a distinct carnous muscle, extended to the ear. Ray on the Creation. CA'RoR, or St. John's Bread. [soliqua, Lat.] A tree very common in Spain, and in some parts of Italy, where it produces a great quantity of long, flat, brown-coloured pods, which are thick, mealy, and of a sweetish taste. These pods are eaten by the poorer inhabitants. Miller. CAR o'ch e. n. 4. [from carosse, Fr.] A coach ; a carriage of pleasure. It is used in the comedy of Albumazar, but now it is obsolete.

CA'ROL. n. 4. [carola, Ital. from choreola, Lat.]

1. A song of joy and exultation. And let the Graces dance unto the rest, For they can do it best: The whiles the maidens do their carol sing, To which the woods shall answer, and their echo ring. Spenter's Epithalamium. Even in the Old Testāment, if you listen to David's harp, you shall hear as many hearse-like airs as carols. Bazar. Oppos'd to her, on t'other side advance The costly feast, the carol, and the dance, Minstrels and musick, poetry and play, And balls by oftournaments by day. Dryden, 2. A song of devotion. No night is now with hymn or carol blest. - Shakspeare. They gladly thither haste; and, by a choir Of squadron'd angels, hear his carol sung. Mio.

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To CA'Rol. v. a. To praise; to celebrate

in song. She with precious viol'd liquors heals, For which the shepherds at their festivals Carol her goodness loud in rustick lays. Milton. CA/R or ID. adi. [carotides, Lat.] ‘I wo arteries which arise out of the ascending trunk of the aorta, near where the subclavian arteries arise. The carotid, vertebral, and splenetick arteries, are not only variously contorted, but also here and there dilated, to moderate the motion of the blood. Ray on the Creation. Ca Ro’Us A L. m. s. [from carouse. It seems more F.". pronounced with the accent upon the second syllable ; but JDryden accents it on the first.] A festival. This game, these carousals Ascanius taught, And building alba to the Latins brought. Dryd.

To CARO'USE. v. n. [carouser, Fr. from gar ausz, all out, Germ.] To drink; to quaff; to drink o He calls for wine: a health, quoth he: as if H'ad been aboard carousing to his mates After a storm. Shakspeare. Learn with how little life may be preserv'd, In gold and myrrh they need not to carouse. Raleigh. Now hats fly off, and youths carouse, Healths first go round, and then the house, The brides came thick and thick. Suckling. Under the shadow of friendly boughs They sit carousing, where their liquor grows. Waller. To CAR 9’us E. o. a. To drink up lavishly. Now my sick fool, Roderigo, Whom love hath turn’d almost the wrong side out, To Desdemona hath to-night carous'd Potations pottle deep. Shakspeare. Our cheerful guests carouse the sparkling tears Of the rich grape, whilst musick charms their cars. Denham. CAR o'U's E. m. s. [from the verb.] 1. A drinking match. Waste in wild riot what your land allows, There ply the early feast, and late carouse. Pope. 2. A hearty dose of liquor. He had so many eyes watching over him, as he could not drink a full carouse of sack, but the state was advertised thereof within few hours after. Davies on Ireland. Please you, we may contrive this afternoon, And quaff carouses to our mistress' health. Shaë. CA Roous ER. m. s. [from carouse..] A drinker; a toper. The bold carouser, and advent'ring dame, Nor fear the fever, nor refuse the flame; Safe in his skill, from all constraint set free

But conscious shame, remorse, and piety. Granv, ,

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artificer in wood; a builder of house and ships. He is distinguished from a joiner, as the carpenter performslago and stronger work. This work performed with advisement good, Godfrey his carpenterr, and men of skill. In all the camp, sent to an aged wood. Fairfr. In building Hiero's great ship, there wo three hundred carpenters employed "o.

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trade or art of a carpenter. It had been more proper for me to have to troduced . before joinery, because no. sity did doubtless compel our forefathers to the conveniency of the first, rather than th:* travagancy of the last. Moxon's M*A*

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viller; a censorious man. have not these weeds, By putting on the cunning of a carper. So

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2. Ground variegated with flowers, and

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To CA’R PET. v. a. [from the noun.] To spread with carpets. We found him in a fair chamber, richly hanged and carpeted under foot, without any degrees to the state; he was set upon a low throne, rich] adorned, and a rich cloth of state over his o, of blue sattin embroidered. Bacon. The dry land we find every where naturally carpeted over with grass, and other agreeable wholesome plants. - erham. CA/R P 1 N G. particip. adj. [from To carp.] Captious; censorious. No carping critick interrupts his praise, No rival strives but for a second place. Granville. Lay aside therefore a carping spirit, and read even an adversary with an honest design to find out his true meaning; do not snatch at little lapses, and appearances of mistake. Moutts. CA’R PIN G L Y. adv. from carping.] Captiously; censoriously. We derive out of the Latin at second hand by the French, and make good English, as in these adverbs, carpingly, currently, actively, colourably. Camden's Remains. CA’s PM EA is. m. s. A kind of coarse cloth made in the north of England. Phillips.

CA’RPU.S. m. . [Ilatin.] The wrist, so named by anatomists, which is made up of eight little bones, of different figures and thickness, placed in two ranks, four in each rank. They are strongly tied together by the ligaments which come from the radius, and by the annulary lf. isiocy. found one of the bones of the carpio lying loose in the wound. Wiseman's Surgery. CA’R R A C K. See CARA C K. CA’R R.A.T. See CARAT. CA’R Raw AY. See CA R Aw a Y., Nay, you shall see mine orchard, where, in an arbour, we will eat a last year's pippin of my own grafting, with a dish of carra-ways, and so forth; come, cousin, silence, and then to bed. Shakspeare's Henry Iv.

CA'RR i a Ge. n.s.. [cariage, Fr. baggage ; from carry.] - . 1. The act of carrying, or transporting, or bearing any thing. The unequal agitation of the winds, though material to the carriage of sounds farther or less way, yet do not confound the articulation. Bacon. If it seem so strange to move this obelisk for so little space, what may we think of the carriage of it out of Egypt? JVilkins. 2. Conquest; acquisition. ... • * Solyman resolved to besiege Vienna, in good hope that, by the carriage away of that, the other cities would, without resistance, be yielded. Knotes's History of the Turks. 3. Vehicle; that in which any thing is carried.

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Thoughin my face there's no affected frown, Nor in my carriage a feign'd niceness shown, I keep my honour still without a stain. Dryden. Let them have ever so learned lectures of breeding, that which will most influence their carriage will be the company they converse with, and the fashion of those about them. Locke. 6. Conduct; measures; practices. You may hurt yourself; nay, utterly Grow from the king's acquaintance, by this carriage. - Shai peare. He advised the new governour to have so much discretion in his carriage, that there might be no notice taken in the exercise of his religion. Clarendor. 7. Management; manner of transacting. Not used. The manner of carriage of the business, was as if there had been secret *jo upon him. con's Henry var. CA'RRI ER. n.s.. [from To carry.] 1. One who carries something. You must distinguish between the motion of the air, which is but a vehiculum cause, a carrier of the sounds, and the sound conveyed. Bacon. For winds, when homeward they return, will - *

rive The loaded carriers from their evening hive. - Dryden. 2. One whose profession or trade is to carry goods for others. I have rather made it my choice to transcribe all, than to venture the loss of my originals by post or carrier. Pierce's Letterr. The roads are crowded with carriers, laden with rich manufactures. wift. 3. A messenger; one who carries a message. The welcome news is in the letter found: The carrier's not commission'd to expound; It speaks itself. Dryden's Religio Laici. 4. The name of a species of pigeons, so called from the reported practice of some nations, who send them with letters tied to their necks, which they carry to the place where they were bred, however remote.

There are tane and wild pigeons; and of tame

there are croppers, carriers, runts. CA'RRION. n. 4. [charogne, Fr.] 1. The carcass of something not proper

for food. - They did eat the dead carrions, and one another soon after; insomuch that the very carcasses they scraped out of their graves. Spenser on Ireland.

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Walton.

It is I That, lying by the violet in the sun, • * Do as the carrion does, not as the flower, Shakr. This foul deed shall smell above the earth, With carrion men groaning for burial. Shakop. You'll ask me why I rather choose to have ..." A weight of carrion flesh, than to receive Three thousand ducats. Shakspeare. . Ravens are seen in flocks where a carrion lies, and wolves in herds to run down a deer. Temple. Sheep, oxen, horses, fall; and, heap'd on high, The diff'ring species in confusion lie; Till, warn'd by frequentills, the way they found To lodge their loathsome carrion under ground. . #". Criticks, as they are birds of prey, have ever a natural inclination to carrios. - ope. 2. Any flesh so corrupted as not to be fit for food. -Not all that pride that makes thee swell, As big as thou dost blown-up veal; Nor all thy tricks and slights to cheat, And sell thy carrion for good meat. Hudibras.

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The wolves will get a breakfast by my death; Yet scarce enough their hunger to supply, For love has made me carrion ere I die. },... 3. A name of reproach for a worthless woman. Shall we send that foolish carrion, Mrs. Quickly, to him, and excuse his throwing into the water R Shakspeare. CA'RRio N. adj. [from the substantive.] Relating to carcasses; feeding upon carcasses. Match to match I have encounter'd him, And make a prey for carrion kites and crows, Ev’n of the bonny beasts he lov'd so well. Shakspeare. The charity of our death-bed visits from one another, is much at a rate with that of a carrion crow to a sheep; we smell a carcass. L'Estrange. CA'RROT. n. 4. [Carote, Fr. daucus, Lat.] An esculent root. Carrots, though garden roots, yet they do well in the fields for seed. Mortimer. His spouse orders the sack to be immediately opened, and greedily pulls out of it half a dozen bunches of carrott. CA'RRot in Ess. n. J. Redness of hair. CA’R Rot Y. adj. [from carrot.] Spoken of red hair, on account of its resemblance in colour to carrots. CA'RRows. n.s.. [an Irish word.] The carrows are a kind of people that wander up and down to gentlemen's houses, living only upon cards and dice; who, though they have little or nothing of their own, yet will they play for much money. Stenter on Ireland. To CA'RRY. v. a. [charier, Fr. from currus, Lat.] r. To convey from a place : opposed to bring, or convey to a place: often with a particle, signifying departure, as away,

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* he dieth he shall carry nothing away. Psalms. And devout men carried Stephen to his burial. Acts. I mean to carry her away this evening by the help of these two soldiers. Dryden's Span. Friar. As in a hive's vimineous dome, Ten thousand bees enjoy their home; Fach does her studious action vary, To go and come, to fetch and carry. Prior. They exposed their goods with the price rmarked, then retired; the merchants came, left the price which they would give upon the goods, and retired; the Seres returning, carried off either their goods or money, as they liked best. Arbuth. 2. To transport. They began to carry about in beds those that were sick. Mark. The species of audibles seem to be carried more manifestly through the air, than the species of visibles. Eacon. Where many great ordnance are shot off together, the sound will be carried, at the least, twenty miles upon the land. Bacon. 3. To bear ; to have about one. Do not take out bones like surgeons I have met with, who carry them about in their pockets. Wiseman's Surgery. 4. To take ; to have with one. If the ideas of liberty and volition were carried along with us in our minds, a great part of the difficulties that perplex men's thoughts would be easier resolved. Locke. I have listened with my utmost attention for

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6. To effect any thing.

There are some vain persons, that whatsoever goeth alone, or moveth upon greater means, if they have never so little food in it, they thiuk it is they that carry it. Bazen. Oft-times, we lose the occasion of carrying a business well thoroughly by our too much haste. Ben jenson's Discovery. These advantages will be of no effect, unless we improve them to words, in the carrying of our main point: .ddion. 7. To gain in competition. And hardly shall I carry out my side, Her o being alive. Ska Proarre. How many stand for consulships?—Three, they say; but itisthought of everyone Coriolanus will carry it. I see not yet how any of these six reasons can be fairly avoided; and yet if any of them hold good, it is enough to carry the cause. Saunderren. The latter still enjoying his pla e, and continuing a joint commissioner of the treasury, still opposed, and commonly carried away everything against him. Clarenden. 8. To gain after resistance. The count wooes your daughter, Lays down his wanton siege before her beauty; Resolves to carry her; let her consent, As we'll direct her now, 'tis best to hear it. Sbaïspeare. What a fortune does the thick lips owe, If he can carry her thus' S eare's Othelle. The town was distressed, and ready for an assault, which, if it had been given, would have cost much blood; but yet the town would have been carried in the end. Bacon's Henry v11. 9. To gain: with it; that is, to prevail. Lle porter, Fr.] Are you all resolv'd to give your voices 2 But thât's no matter; the greater part carries it. Shakspeare: By these, and the like arts, they promised themselves that they should easily carry it, so that they entertained the house o the morning with other debates. Clarenden. If the numerousness of a train must carry it, virtue may go follow Astraea, and vice only will be worth the courting. Glanville. Children, who live together, often strive for mastery, whose wills shall carry it over the rest. Lacks. In pleasures and pains, the present is apt to carry it, and those at a distance have the disadvantage in the comparison. Le:#r. Io. To bear out; to face through: with it. If a man carrier it off, there is so much money saved; and if he be detected, there will be something pleasant in the frolick. L’Estrange. II. To continue external appearance. My niece is already in the belief that he's mad; we may carry if thus for our pleasure and his penance. Bašpeare. 12. To manage; to transact. The senate is generally as numerous as cur house of commons; and yet carries its resolutions so privately, that they are seldom known. Addin 13. To behave; to conduct: with the reciprocal pronoun. Neglect not also the examples of those that have carried themselves ill in the same place. Bates.

He attended the king into Scotland, where he

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